Posts tagged with "Indianapolis Museum of Art":

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On View> Sopheap Pich: A Room at the Indianapolis Museum of Art

Sopheap Pich: A Room Indianapolis Museum of Art 4000 Michigan Road Indianapolis, Indiana Through August 24 Among the currently running exhibitions in the Indianapolis Museum of Art is a bamboo installation that embodies the essence and culture of Cambodia. Entitled A Room, this brainchild of acclaimed Cambodian contemporary artist Sopheap Pich furnishes the Efroymson Family Entrance with approximately 1,200 bamboo strips. The bamboo strips, both natural and artificial, are arranged into a circular curtain that extends 40 feet from the floor to its peak. The area inside the bamboo curtain measures 26 feet in diameter and is illuminated by natural light filtered through or between the bamboo pieces, making it an ideal location for visitors to meditate. Pich is distinguished by his consistent use of bamboo and rattan strips in his art installations. In this particular case, the light coming through the bamboo strips emulates the sensation of standing in a bamboo forest in Cambodia.
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Eavesdrop Midwest Goes to the Kentucky Derby

Maybe You Lost My Number: Eavesdrop wants to know why we weren’t invited to your Kentucky Derby party, De Leon and Primmer. You guys are practically the only cool architecture firm in the River City! We were down in Louisville the weekend of the Derby and wandered (hungover, naturally) past your office on Sunday morning. That new bright green, sort of trellised structure erected in front of your place was really enticing. We wandered through that and did a little look-y loo in the windows of your studio, where we noticed the remnants of a party, like, 15 empty bourbon bottles. You guys, bourbon is Eavesdrop’s favorite beverage. We have so much in common! Call us! Don’t Hold Indiana Against Them: Driving I-65 the length of Indiana is so unbearable with its “Hell is REAL” billboards and endless Monsanto fields of pesticides, but it’s necessary to get from Chicago to the South. On our way home from the Derby, we were reminded of two places we’ve been meaning to stop and stretch our legs—and, no, it’s not the outlet mall. Seasonal tours at the Saarinen-designed Miller House in Columbus, Indiana, have restarted. The house is now owned and maintained by the Indianapolis Museum of Art, the second place in Indiana we’ve been meaning to check out. This Architectural Life: The drive wasn’t that bad because I discovered a must-listen radio show devoted to design and architecture: 99% Invisible on WBEZ, Chicago’s NPR station. Look it up!
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On View> Indianapolis Museum of Art Showing “Ai Weiwei: According to What?”

AI WEIWEI: ACCORDING TO WHAT? Indianapolis Museum of Art Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery 4000 Michigan Road Indianapolis, Indiana Through July 21 Ai Weiwei is internationally recognized as one of China’s most controversial and influential contemporary artists. In his exhibition Ai Weiwei: According to What?, the artist, through various media (sculpture, photography, architectural installations, and video), boldly addresses issues of human rights in China and comments on the nation’s history, traditions, and politics. The exhibit features more than 30 works spanning more than 20 years. One is an early work, Forever (2003), in which Ai arranged 42 Forever brand bicycles into a circle, to honor China’s most popular, and reliable (the bicycles were made of heavy-duty steel), mode of transportation during the mid-1900s. The exhibit is also devoted to Ai’s more provocative pieces, such as a 38-ton steel carpet entitled Straight (2008). The artist used rusted steel rebar taken from the remains of a poorly-built school that collapsed during the 2008 Sichuan earthquake that tragically killed more than 5,000 schoolchildren. The piece commemorates the thousands of lost lives while openly condemning the Chinese government’s stance on human rights.
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Michael Graves Appointed to Federal Post on Accessibility in the Built Environment

President Obama's second-term White House is still in transition, with Ray LaHood out and rumors of an NTSB replacement, Sally Jewell likely in as Secretary of Interior. Among the non-Cabinet-level appointments, the President appointed Michael Graves to a member of the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, an agency "devoted to accessibility for people with disabilities." Graves, who uses a wheelchair after an illness-induced partial paralysis, has been a leader in promoting accessibility in architecture, recently designing prototype houses for wounded and disabled veterans. This month, Graves will also be launching a new line of more than 300 products at retailer J.C. Penney, including kitchen appliances, candlesticks, and a toaster shaped like a piece of toast. The Indianapolis-born architect will return to his hometown on March 28 to give a lecture at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and he recently spoke with the Indy Star about delivering papers for the publication as a child, architecture, and the new product line. An exhibition of Graves' work, From Towers to Teakettles, is also on display at the Virginia Center for Architecture through March 31.
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On View> Alyson Shotz’s Geometry of Light at the Indianapolis Museum of Art

Alyson Shotz: The Geometry of Light Indianapolis Museum of Art 4000 Michigan Rd. Indianapolis, IN Through January 6, 2013 Following the U.S premiere of her animated Fluid State, which visualizes the creation of matter in a fictional landscape, artist Alyson Shotz has adapted her installation The Geometry of Light for the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion Series. Shotz—who is recognized for exploring the physical world by engaging with concepts of light, gravity, and space—uses industrial materials such as stainless steel wire, silvered glass beads, and cut Fresnel lens sheets to form a sculpture that considers the duality of light as both particle and wave. During daylight hours, natural light filters through the lens sheets, and the varying angles bring life to the piece as the position of the sun changes throughout the day. By moving through the room, visitors perceive how light and motion shape the experience of space.
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Digitizing Saarinen’s Miller House

Even if Columbus, Indiana is not on your travel itinerary Eero Saarinen’s Miller House and Garden may come to you via the internet. Last week, the Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA) announced a $190,000 grant from the National Endowment for Humanities (NEH) to digitize its Miller House and Garden Collection. The house—a celebrated collaboration between architect Saarinen, interior designer Alexander Girard, and landscape architect Dan Kiley—opened for tours last year , and the museum reports more than 6,500 tour tickets were sold. With the increased interest comes a growing number of requests from researchers asking for access to the home’s archives. While in good condition, the museum writes in their NEH proposal that “repeated handling would quickly degrade these important and unique materials."  With the digitization, visitors would not only be able to view the home itself, but explore over 50 years of administrative documents covering the home's design and construction. These include: house inventories, construction plans, and correspondence between client and designers. The museum estimates that it would take about two years to finish the project. Once done, the archive will be available on the web through Archon, an open source archives management tool. IMA, however, still needs to collect an additional $73,000, to complete its initial project estimate of $263,000."If no further funds are available, the museum will make decisions about the priority and importance of the material and edit the project accordingly,” said Bradley C. Brooks, IMA’s Director of Historic Resources.“Very few archival collections of Modernist architecture are available online, and digitizing the Miller House and Garden Collection will provide a new precedent for engaging researchers from multiple disciplines in the study of materials of this kind,” Brooks added. IMA has whetted our appetites with the below photo of J. Irwin Miller’s correspondence with Saarinen, which kickstarted the landmark project. Miller writes to Saarinen, “I think we will have a good deal of fun working this out.” Fifty years later, we’re all still enthralled by the results.