Posts tagged with "Inception":

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Dreams bend into furniture with this Inception-style coffee table

The frontier-era drama The Revenant, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Hardy, may have won best picture at last night’s Golden Globes, but it’s the actors’ 2010 mind-bending film Inception that has inspired some seriously cool (yet questionably practical) furniture. The “Wave City Coffee Table,” created by Cypriot-based designer Stelios Mousarris, emulates the scene from the Christopher Nolan–directed thriller in which Ellen Page’s character Ariadne, a student at the Ecole Speciale d’Architecture in Paris, “messes with the physics” of a dream. The resulting bent cityscape mesmerized audiences around the world—and now around the coffee table. This cantilevering wood and steel table features an urban landscape bending over itself, as depicted in the film. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x9hBWnh_O6A Mousarris, who previously worked for Foster and Partners as a modelmaker and for Duffy London as an assistant designer, created the unusual piece using 3D printing technology. His other work proves just as unique, and includes the “Carpet Sofa,” which can be custom-made with a carpet that fits your individual space, and the “Half Couch,” which is described by Mousarris as balancing on one side “whilst perfectly supporting the human weight on the other side.” The limited-edition table is available for purchase on the designer’s website for €5,000, although you may only be able to afford it in your dreams.
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Quick Clicks> Zigzag, Walking, Movies, Retro, Rail

[ Quick Clicks> AN's guided tour of links from across the web. And beyond. ] Zigzag. In April 2009, the Virginia Department of Transportation installed a painted zigzag stripe where a road and a bike trail intersect. Wash Cycle reports that VDOT has since studied the effects of the experimental installation and determined the lines have improved safety and reduced speeds at the trail crossing. These zigzags common overseas, but could they be coming to a street corner near you? Distracted Walking? Better watch where you walk with those headphones. ABC reports that legislators in New York and Arkansas have proposed banning pedestrians from using cell phones or wearing headphones at crosswalks under penalty of a $100 fine. Proponents claim it will increase safety, but it seems to be a classic blame-the-pedestrian response to traffic fatalities. Any chance this will one day hit the books? Starchitecture? Well, sort of. With the Academy Awards right around the corner, Curbed rounded up a collection of design from this year's contenders including the decaying interiors in The King's Speech to the temple-like Inception dining room to Lowell, Mass.'s blue-collar homes in The Fighter. You might also remember AN's recent look at movie architecture. Back in '87. With the proliferation of shiny condo buildings across Manhattan, it's easy to forget the grittier ghost of New York past. EV Grieve uncovered a series of photos of the East Village from the late 1980s showing boarded and burned buildings in Alphabet City. State of the Rail. After last night's State of the Union address in Washington, D.C., Transportation Nation takes a look at continued plans to criss-cross the nation with High Speed Rail. In his Speech, the President set a goal that 80 percent of the U.S. population would have access to High Speed Rail in 2036.
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A Brief History of Old Buildings Going Futuro On Film

Talk of William Pereira’s Geisel Library, the well-known symbol of UC San Diego, has been abuzz online because of its Snow Fortress doppelganger in Inception, which has so far totaled close to half a billion dollars in ticket sales.  Built in the late 1960s, this textbook example of Brutalism perfectly encapsulates the hostile, uncommunicative theme of Inception. Critics of the style say Brutalist architecture disregards the history and harmony of its environment. Thus, the Snow Fortress, featured at the film’s climax, is a symbol of disregard for preordained fate. Although the Geisel Library, named after Theodore Seuss Geisel or Dr. Seuss, was conceived over five decades ago, it does not seem out of place in a futuristic world. Similarly, the Bradbury Building in Los Angeles, designed by George H. Wyman, was built in 1893. Yet, this “retro-futuristic-gothic”  building was featured in Blade Runner, The Outer Limits and Mission: Impossible, among others.  Minority Report used the Ronald Reagan building  in Washington, D.C. as its Orwellian police headquarters (Frank Lloyd Wright's Ennis House also starred as Harrison Ford's residence in Blade Runner). Greene and Greene's Robert R. Blacker House in Pasadena is an iconically American house that served as Dr. Emmett Brown’s house in Back to the Future and a grandfather’s house in Armageddon. It seems regardless of how futuristic a movie is, the buildings of yesteryear and today can still lend their symbolic power to help layer a movie with meaning.