Posts tagged with "HVAC":

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URBAN-X startups pitch free electric shuttles, modern HVAC, and digitized construction equipment

Yesterday at A/D/O, a MINI-sponsored creative space in Brooklyn, New York, seven start-ups pitched their companies to an audience of investors and public sector agencies as part of URBAN-X's Demo Day. URBAN-X is an accelerator for urban tech companies that was launched in 2016 by BMW-owned car brand MINI, one of its many forays into rethinking shelter, fashion, and design. The seven start-ups are members of URBAN-X's fifth cohort, bringing the total number of companies that URBAN-X has fostered to 39. URBAN-X selects up to 10 start-ups twice a year for its program, which includes a $150,000 investment and five months of support in engineering, design, and business development. Urban mobility and access to electric vehicles featured prominently in this cohort, not a surprising theme for an incubator with roots in the automotive sector. But other strong trends, like construction site productivity and emissions efficiency, pointed to a focus on the built environment and its relationship with ecological concerns. If this cohort is any indication of the trends in urban mobility, then the two startups dedicated to transit hinted at a very electric future. Borrow offers short-term, flexible leasing of electric vehicles, making them more available to those who can't purchase the pricey cars, while Circuit, formerly The Free Ride, offers free electric shuttle transportation in five-passenger vehicles for short distances. The latter is already rolled out in 17 cities around the United States, with more than 20 cars on the streets of San Diego. With funding from advertisers, private developers, and transit agencies, the free shuttle is specially designed for first- and last-mile conditions to supplement other forms of transit, and also offers hail and on-demand services. Brooklyn residents and visitors can experience Circuit for themselves, with the company extending its Williamsburg run this summer. Buildstream and Toggle both address construction site safety and other challenges. Buildstream (formerly GearBuddy) utilizes IoT-based software and machine learning to digitize data collection on heavy construction equipment like bulldozers and trucks to monitor and assess construction sites in real time, allowing someone at an office desk and not just the construction manager on site to monitor what is happening. The technology is currently in use in the U.K. on one of Europe's largest infrastructure projects, according to David Polanski, co-founder and COO of the company. Toggle, on the other hand, combines software and industrial robotics to help automate the construction site and reduce costs in the building process. Energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions are also a central concern of this year's cohort. Treau develops technology to improve energy efficiency in cooling and heating systems, essentially bringing HVAC and refrigerants into the modern age with lighter, more inexpensive polymers and other material innovations. The overarching promise of Treau is to reduce energy consumption in the U.S. by 10 percent. Another vital but less glamorous aspect of city life is waste management infrastructure. Israel-based GreenQ's technology attaches to existing truck-based garbage collection systems to collect data and offer analytics to help meet demand and cut costs where needed. For example, in its applications across Israel cities, towns, and villages, GreenQ has identified areas that need one less collection day a week, or data on what homes or users need larger trash receptacles. The data from the garbage also delivers demographic data for those companies it partners with. Consumption and waste were also addressed by Thrilling, the first e-commerce platform for second-hand and vintage stores, with a goal of reducing carbon, waste, and water footprints in garment production. From transit to garbage, the technology-driven platforms of these start-ups hints an increasingly wired, mobile urban future to come.

Interior décor radiators

New product design contest on Desall.com: IRSAP and Desall invite you to design a family of electric radiators, with a modern and minimal design, that may be perceived as furnishing elements inside the environments where they are placed.

IRSAP is looking for a new family of electric radiators, consisting of a radiator for the bathroom and one for the living area, with a special focus on design, aesthetics and possibly additional functionalities.

For more info: https://bit.ly/IRSAPcontest

Contest timeline

Upload phase: 4th April 2019 – 4th July 2019 (1.59 PM UTC)

Community vote: 4th July 2019 – 18th July 2019 (1.59 PM UTC)

Client Vote: from 4th July 2019

Winner announcement: approximately before the end of September 2019

Optional deadlines

Concept revision:              4th May 2019 (1.59 PM UTC)

End of hidden option:        19th May 2019 (1.59 PM UTC)

Total awards

€5000

Participation is free of charge and open to all creative people (at least 18 years old).

IRSAP

IRSAP Group, with more than a thousand employees, of which more than 600 abroad, is one of the leading Italian groups in the European heating industry. IRSAP is among the first company to introduce in Italy, in 1967, the mild steel tubular radiator and the very first to make towel rails in Italy back in 1983.

Today, still a family business arrived at the fourth generation the company want to renovate entering into the furniture industry

DESALL

Desall.com is an open innovation platform dedicated to design and innovation, that offers to companies a participatory design tool involving in the creative process an international community coming from all over the world. To date Desall gathers more than 100000 creatives from over 210 countries and has collaborated with international brands like Luxottica, Whirlpool, Electrolux, ALESSI, Enel, Leroy Merlin, KINDER, Barilla, illy, Chicco, Mondadori and many more.

Thanks for the contamination of different cultural backgrounds and creative industries, the Desall community is able to provide high-quality project solutions for every product development phase requested by the client, from concept to product design, from naming to packaging.

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Ancient technology gets an update in sustainable cooling solution

“The way we cool our buildings right now is totally wrong,” said Indian architect Monish Siripurapu in a video produced the United Nations' Environment program. The words are bleak, but arguably true; the electricity and hydrofluorocarbons most modern cooling systems demand ironically warm the planet overall while they cool our conditioned spaces. On top of that, with global temperatures rising and worldwide populations growing, demands for cooling are only increasing. More eco-friendly options are urgently needed, and Siripurapu’s New Delhi–based firm Ant Studio has proposed an affordable, scalable, sustainable, and aesthetically appealing solution to the problem of air conditioning. Ant Studio’s mission is to combine “art, nature, and technology,” and its temperature-regulating solution is designed to be as much an art installation as a cooling system. The Beehive, as the system's first iteration is called, was built to ameliorate high-temperature conditions for laborers at the Noida, Uttar Pradesh–based manufacturer Deki Electronics, where generators and other equipment output their own heat, adding to high outdoor temperatures. The Beehive is part of a larger exploration by the firm that leverages terracotta tubes and water as part of a low-energy cooling system. The Beehive, so-named for its honeycomb-like structure, follows an Indian tradition of using earthenware to cool water. “Traditional architecture has so much wisdom,” said Siripurapu. The ancient process has been wholly modernized, with tools such as computational fluid dynamics modeling, as well as the addition of low-energy water pumps and, if needed, electric fans. But instead of using fans with the Beehive installation, Ant Studio’s cooling device was placed right in front of the exhaust vents of the diesel generator near where workers at the factory were active. This was able to drop the “scorching” air being expelled from the generator from 122 degrees Fahrenheit to 97 degrees Fahrenheit, while lowering the overall temperature in the area and reportedly consuming 40 percent less energy than other cooling systems, not to mention using no refrigerants. The cooling system consists of arrays of open terracotta cylindrical cones (designed in such a way to maximize surface area and fired at “mid-level” temperatures to maintain the clay’s ability to absorb moisture from the air) over which water is poured. The water, which adheres to the clay, naturally lowers in temperature due to evaporative cooling, which in turn cools the air passing through the tubes. The water can be recycled throughout the system, requiring only infrequent topping off, and biofilms of microalgae that grow on the clay surfaces can actually aid in air purification, according to the firm. Further, as explained in an informational video from the firm, “all materials are recyclable, reusable, or biodegradable.” While the Beehive at Dika Electronics took on a particular nature-inspired form, the system can be designed in all manner of shapes and sizes, and is inherently modular, making fabrication and assembling on-site simple. The overall hope with the project is to devise a system that is functional and visually appealing at the same time.” Ant Studio views the cooling systems as a work of sculpture as much as a functional tool. The terracotta cooling systems also could have broader social impact. Besides being a cheap, energy-efficient way to cool factories and public spaces, the craft required to manufacture the tubes creates local employment and skill-building opportunities. It also keeps alive traditional manufacturing techniques that provide a unique, hand-hewn character that industrial cooling systems certainly lack. The clay-based materials also mean a net reduction in embodied energy for these cooling systems. Ant Studio has also proposed a smaller system which they’re calling ETHER, a cooling device for personal use and small spaces that resembles something like a cross between a Dyson fan and an ancient artifact. Ant Studio’s cooling projects were one of the twelve winners of the United Nations’ Asia-Pacific Low Carbon Lifestyles Challenge and have been nominated for the Clean Energy Challenge from What Design Can Do, a “platform” and series of global conferences on design. Nominated teams are given the “opportunity to improve their project” with the final winners to be announced on March 6.
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The newest HVAC systems are smart, green, and clean the air

Intuitive and in some cases self-regulated, these heating, cooling, and pump systems are easily monitored and controlled, remotely and in person.

NCC199CDV Noritz ENERGY STAR-certified, this tankless heater can be paired with up to 24 other units. The system is outfitted with a wireless energy source that can heat water at an exact temperature. CITY MULTI ceiling cassette with 3-D i-see Sensor Mitsubishi Electric No more fighting over the thermostat! CITY MULTI continuously assesses the temperature via a 3-D sensor. It cools and heats as needed, and it can even be customized to direct air toward or away from people.
WhisperFresh Select Panasonic What a breeze! Panasonic’s ventilation fan filters outdoor air for the indoors. With nine speeds, it can accommodate green building standards for a range of room sizes. Buderus SSB Industrial Boiler Bosch Small but mighty, this boiler can be installed in odd-shaped spaces. It has the wherewithal to produce nearly four times the amount of energy of any standard boiler, allowing users to easily quadruple output (if so desired).
SANICONDENS BEST Saniflo This combined water pump and heater is outfitted with a built-in acid neutralizer. With four inlets, it can pump water coming in and out simultaneously. BA-1200 Better Air Environments This autonomous system disperses organic probiotics that naturally purify the air. It is easily added to any existing HVAC system.
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Specsheet >Customizable HVAC systems and innovative weather barriers

CÔR WI-FI THERMOSTAT Carrier
The latest version of the Carrier Côr wi-fi thermostat is enabled to work with Apple HomeKit. Users can utilize iOS-enabled devices to control their Côr thermostat from anywhere with the iOS 10 Home app or Siri on iPhone, iPad, or Apple Watch. The HomeKit technology is end-to-end encrypted with authentication between the heating and cooling system and the iOS device.
SKYLINE SLIM TILE FACADE Neolith These thin tile facades feature large Neolith slabs with near-zero porosity, making them resistant to changes in temperatures and extreme weather conditions, sun exposure, scratches, graffiti, and warping. The tiles are also surface-treated with a Pureti coating to reduce the effects of pollutants and decrease long-term maintenance costs.
 
VRP Friedrich Friedrich recently launched a variable refrigerant packaged (VRP) heat pump system, a total HVAC solution that also incorporates air and humidity controls. It includes a precision inverter compressor that reduces sound, and combines variable refrigerant flow designed for hospitality, multifamily, and commercial applications.
SMART VENT Keen Home Keen Home is introducing a wireless, app-enabled zoning system that redirects airflow to regulate individual room temperature. Powered by AA batteries, the Smart Vents conveniently create a Zig-Bee mesh network controlled via a smartphone app. The app provides open-close controls that can be programmed with daily schedules to close vents based on room occupancy. Aerodynamic airfoil louvers ensure quiet operation and airflow.
LONGOTON TERRA-COTTA RAINSCREEN FACADE SYSTEM Shildan/Moeding Longoton is a high-performance terra-cotta facade panel system that can be incorporated in horizontal and vertical configurations and also function as a rain-screen. The panels are available in 16 standard colors, custom colors, custom glazing, and standard and varying finishes and profiles.
TDP05K Ruskin Eight moisture-resistant flex sensors and multiple velocity and temperature points make these thermal dispersion airflow and temperature measuring probes super-accurate. The TDP05K probe can measure a velocity range of from 0 to 5,000 FPM and will display the flow and temperature at each sensing point.
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Product>Innovations in HVAC systems

Intuitive heating, cooling, and pump systems allow for site-specific control and easy installation. Android by Daniel Libeskind Antrax IT Daniel Libeskind devised not only an aesthetically appealing radiator, but also a sustainability-conscious one. In addition to its simple folds that emulate origami, Android is made of 100-percent recyclable material and requires very limited water content. The unit can be mounted horizontally or vertically, with an optional steel towel bar, and is available in over 200 color options.

VRP Heat Pump system Friedrich

Using a variable-speed compressor, this system is much quieter than a standard unit as it does not need to fully shut off and on to regulate temperature. Additionally, onboard sensors that monitor compressor speeds offer exceptional humidity control.

Art Cool Gallery LG

A one-of-a-kind duct-free indoor model both heats and cools a space while remaining out of sight. The unit can service multizone systems, and is compatible with outdoor Multi F units to support eight spaces. Users can choose from a variety of images to frame, or add custom art and photographs.

SCALA2 Grundfos

The SCALA2 is an innovative water booster pump suitable for residential buildings with up to three floors and eight taps. There is a built-in sensor that continually monitors water pressure. If pressure drops below a desired level, the pump will kick into overdrive so water is never down to a trickle, all with a noise level as quiet as a dishwasher.

Heat-only Thermostat with Touchscreen Uponor

A new, sleek offering from Uponor streamlines the user experience of its typical thermostat, which controls residential hydronic radiant heating systems. The touchscreen system can control both an air sensor and a floor sensor to accurately monitor the temperature in individual spaces and automatically adjust. 

City Multi L-Generation Air-Source Outdoor Unit Mitsubishi Electric

Thanks to HexiCoil, a new zinc-aluminum flat-tube heat exchanger developed by Mitsubishi, the L-Generation unit provides superior durability and water-shedding capabilities. Additional enhancements include a 30-percent-smaller footprint and improved vertical separation between indoor units, which allow for greater design flexibility.

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Product> Temperature Controlled: Smart HVAC Systems

Smart HVAC products are quickly gaining traction in the architecture and design industry. From air curtains to smart thermostats, managing heating and cooling systems has never been easier. Smart Thermostat Momit Connect Smart Thermostat to any smartphone, tablet, or PC and control HVAC systems with your fingertips. This thermostat features three modes—Smart, Ambient, and Presence—that are energy efficient. It’s designed with a glass finish, six display options, detectable sensors, and 30 easy-to-use features. Model AB Reznor Designed for installation over docks and bays, these industrial air curtains block wind from entering buildings to help keep cool air indoors during warm months. The air curtains are powered by gas or propane and can run in a blower-only mode. Model AB comes in two sizes, which can be joined together to reach a maximum width of 22 feet. V-Series Allied Air Enterprises New to the Magic-Pak family, V-Series is a heating and cooling single-packaged vertical unit that’s made for both multifamily and mixed-use environments. It’s available in 1-, 1.5-, 2-, and 2.5-ton capacities and both gas-electric unit and electric-electric unit options. The V-Series efficiencies range from 9.2 to 11.0 EER and 80 to 90 percent TE. ecobee3 ecobee This smart thermostat includes wireless remote sensors that measure the temperature in a variety of rooms, allowing homeowners to remotely adjust heating, cooling, humidity, and fan settings with ecobee’s residential mobile app. Users can access multiple thermostats at once and schedule HVAC settings for long and short periods of time. Trilogy 45 Q-Mode ClimateMaster This geothermal heat pump system features more than 25 unit settings and iGate Connect, which allows the user to control the system via WiFi. Available in vertical-upflow, vertical-downflow, and horizontal compositions, this system sucks in heat from a designated space and stores it in the iGate Smart Tank hot water storage tank for use. Lyric Honeywell Lyric is an interactive thermostat that allows the user to remotely adjust heating, cooling, and humidity settings in a matter of seconds. The easy-to-use device features a three-inch round glass face, smart cues, geofencing technology, and a motion-sensing, illuminated display.
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Hot Topic: Yves Béhar's new thermostat design the latest in a growing line of smart home gadgets

The once-prosaic thermostat has become a high profile design object as of late. As a critical gateway for the "Internet of Things" and the world of the connected home, it's increasingly seen as an HVAC status symbol. With his new scheme for the Hive for British Gas, Yves Béhar takes a step back from the fray and focuses on the unit's ease of use. Compared to the first learning thermostat, Nest, and its smart-home spawn, Hive takes a low-key approach to aesthetics—but does so via some fairly fancy interface technology. Until it is touched, the face of the unit remains a blank, mirror-like surface. Changeable frames for the Hive (above) work to bring the user into the experience and put them in control of the device—not vice versa. Nest's hardware and interface are resolutely minimalist—indisputably a factor in its success in the marketplace (it's estimated that 10,000 units are sold every day)—but graphically, it's more heavy-handed and generic. The Ecobee3 wi-fi thermostat features remote mini-monitors that track the temperature in more than one room of the house. Occupancy sensors help save energy and reduce operating costs. The device's rounded corners and a cutesy insect icon convey an emphasis less on science and more on everyday accessibility. From the originator of the original Round thermostat (which was designed by Henry Dreyfuss), the Lyric has geofencing capability, which enables the device to adjust automatically, based on the location of the user's smartphone. By inverting the dome profile of Dreyfuss' 1953 icon, the design pays homage to a classic while supporting today's technology.
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Just six logs keep this cafe warm and cozy in Buffalo, New York

Wintry Buffalo, New York is about the last place you might expect to find a building with no mechanical HVAC system. Yet that's where a pair of architects fired up their custom-designed masonry heater, also called a kachelofen, which warms a contemporary cafe space by burning just six logs per day—even through a record-breaking winter where the average temperature was just 22.8 degrees. Where possible, architects are increasingly ditching mechanical heating and cooling systems to cut carbon footprints and sometimes budgets. But frigid western New York is a tough climate to tackle without the benefits of modern mechanical heating. University at Buffalo architects Stephanie Davidson and Georg Rafailidis, who run their own practice, pulled it off using a specially engineered masonry heater. Their kachelofen (pronounced KA-hell-oh-fen) is a wood stove that on a typical day slowly radiates the heat from a single, hour-long burn over the following 24 hours. A long, rectangular flue pipes smoke from the burn around a doubled-over, 30-foot loop, warming up as exhaust from the fire flows through. Charlotte Hsu from The University at Buffalo quotes Davidson:
“Very long horizontal flues are unusual because smoke wants to go up, so it’s very challenging to keep it from stagnating,” says Davidson, a UB clinical assistant professor of architecture. “Many of the masons we talked to said they couldn’t do a horizontal flue longer than 8 feet.”
Rochester, New York's Empire Masonry Heaters could, however. They helped the architects enliven the flue chamber, covering the refractory cement with patterned tiles reminiscent of an intricate mosaic. Their ornamental chamber doubles as a café bench. The kachelofen is known in North America simply as a masonry heater. While its winter-busting abilities are new to Buffalo, it is a centuries-old form of heating in Northern Europe. North America is “a fertile ground for new developments on masonry heater construction,” said the architects of the cheekily-dubbed Cafe Fargo. “It seems also with a widening consciousness about 'green' forms of heating, and rising heating costs, the good old masonry heater is grabbing peoples' interest,” they told AN. At only 880 square feet, their cafe is well-suited to the system. But Davidson and Rafailidis said masonry heating could work in larger spaces, too, but it might require several heaters to evenly heat multiple rooms. Wood-fired systems also need to be constantly monitored. Buffalo takes a degree of pride in its cold and snowy conditions, but if you've warmed up to the radiant heat of Cafe Fargo you may want to drop by—it's still looking for a tenant.
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Product> Climate, Controlled: Top Heating & Cooling Products

These innovative, resource-conscious building products keep structures—and their occupants—comfortable while maximizing energy efficiency. ProSol TF+ Schüco This high-efficiency, thin-film photovoltaic module produces up to 30 percent more electrical output than conventional thin-film products, due to its tandem cell structure. High-Mass Radiant Heating/Cooling System Uponor In this hydronic radiant system, warm or cool water flows through cross-linked polyethylene tubing; flexible, it needs fewer connections and is approved for continuous hot-water recirculation. IceBank Thermal Energy Storage CALMAC Ice-cooled air produced with this thermal energy system shifts a building's cooling needs to off-peak hours. Comfy Building Robotics Web- and mobile-based software lets office workers warm or cool their specific locations, while fine-tuning the building's energy use and optimizing HVAC efficiency. VRF Zoning Systems Mitsubishi Electric Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) zoning systems operate efficiently at partial-load conditions, helping to optimize energy savings and lower costs. Quantum Vue Lutron This mobile-friendly software lets facility managers monitor, analyze, and program all energy usage in a building, and ties all lighting and shade controls together.