Posts tagged with "Herzog & de Meuron":

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Renderings revealed for Herzog & de Meuron’s smart homes in South Beach

Fancy a rooftop retreat in South Beach? Herzog & de Meuron's got you covered. The Swiss architects, in collaboration with developer Robert Wennett, have designed two spacious homes right near Lincoln Road in Miami Beach's South Beach neighborhood. Each three-bedroom, three-and-a-half-bathroom home features 1,550 square feet of outdoor space anchored by a Raymond Jungles–designed "courtyard oasis"—fancy-speak for a lush backyard area. The development's parking garage opened in 2010, but this is the first time developers have released renderings of the homes, called 1111 Lincoln Residences. The clean-lined abodes are expected to open this fall. The 2,000-square-foot homes, predictably, cost a pretty penny. For those with the cash, each $3.8 million residence affords access to an events space, over 100,000 square feet of rentable offices, and Herzog & de Meuron's house-of-cards parking garage, a structure that stands out even in a city with a number of awfully good parking structures.
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Herzog & de Meuron will transform Brooklyn’s “Batcave” into an art powerhouse

Swiss firm Herzog & de Meuron are a dab hand when it comes to converting power stations, especially the brick kind. Slathered in graffiti, the "Batcave" in Brooklyn began life as a rapid transit power plant in 1904. Come the 1950s however, the Thomas E. Murray–designed station had been decommissioned and in the decades that followed morphed into a punk squat and venue for New York's edgiest parties. Now the 113-year-old building will be reincarnated once again, this time as a manufacturing center for the arts, courtesy of Herzog & de Meuron. The "Batcave" will be a place for metal, wood, ceramic, textile and print production. Emulating their hugely successful approach to the former Bankside Power Station in London (now the Tate Modern), the focal point of Herzog & de Meuron's renovation revolves around the existing Turbine Hall. Here, space will be configured to create workshops. In addition to this, the Boiler House which was once demolished will be rebuilt. "By preserving, restoring and reconstructing essential elements of the original Power Station—some still intact and some long-ago demolished—this design strengthens its relationship to the immediate urban context,” said Ascan Mergenthaler, senior partner at Herzog & de Meuron in a press release. “The aim is to demonstrate sensitivity to the program by integrating existing layers seamlessly into a functional, modern manufacturing facility.” Residing on the banks of the Gowanus Canal, the "Batcave" got its name at the turn of the century when it became a hotspot for young urban explorers and artists who enamored its walls. Graffiti expert Henry Chalfant was invited to the Batcave to see if there was any wall art of historical significance. "If this place is renovated, it would be great if these interior walls were kept as they were and not made pristine again," he told the New York Times. Construction is due to begin this year and be completed by 2020. The facility will be run by the Powerhouse Environmental Arts Foundation. The foundation picked up the site in 2012 for $7 million and began environmental remediation under the New York State Brownfield Cleanup Program.
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New details revealed for Herzog & de Meuron’s $2 billion development in L.A.

Those holding their breath in anticipation of seeing Herzog & de Meuron’s 6AM project—developed by Irvine, California–based developer SunCal and located in Los Angeles’s booming Arts District neighborhood—anytime soon are in for a long wait. Why? Because according to a preliminary report filed with the Los Angeles City Planning Department (LACPD), the $2 billion development is not expected to be completed until 2035. As reported by Urbanize.LA, the multi-phase project (the firm’s first in Los Angeles) is due to ultimately contain, among other components, a pair of articulated, 58-story housing towers. The project’s initial environmental report indicates that 6AM will function like a small-scale city, complete with a large grocery store, arts spaces, offices, a school, and other diversely-programed amenities, all developed, according to the document, in “a range of building types and heights that are based on the existing building typologies” and crafted from “rough, ‘authentic’ and typical industrial construction materials.” The 2,824,245-square foot complex will ultimately contain a total of 1,305 apartments, 412 hotel rooms, 431 condominium units, 253,514-square-feet of office space, an approximately 29,316-square-foot school, approximately 127,609 square feet of community-serving retail, and 22,429 square feet of art space. The project will be organized as a porous, mid-rise, mixed-use district on the ground floor, with the arts programs, school, commercial areas, offices and live/work lofts organized in a set of gridded blocks topped by a 40-foot-tall concrete platform. The four-story-tall platform—articulated in renderings that accompany the report by square-shaped, exposed concrete piers—will act as a tabletop for a second layer of program to be located directly above, mainly apartments. Generally speaking, those apartments are to be organized along five of the six linear bands that run from north to south along the short dimension of the 15-acre site. The band closest to the Alameda Street-fronting towers will contain office spaces throughout. The apartment blocks will contain a mix of unit sizes, with a section along Mill Street dedicated to hotel uses. The apartments, like the two towers at the opposite end of the site along Alameda, will look down on the ground floor areas via a series of openings designed into the concrete tabletop structure. Those towers, made up of a bundled set or square floor plates arranged at staggered heights, will rise along Alameda Street beside a potential light rail line to be built to Artesia in southeast Los Angeles. The lowest section of the northern tower is also being designed to contain a hotel.
  • Building 1, located at the corner of 6th and Mill Street will contain a 152-room hotel and 22,429 square feet of arts programming. The 118-foot-tall structure will contain a hotel-focused “amenity deck” along the eighth floor. This building will also contain an undisclosed number of apartment units.
  • Building 2, also 118 feet tall, will contain 245 condominiums atop the platform and approximately 41,852 square feet of retail along the lower levels. It is anticipated that this block will contain the site’s aforementioned grocery store in the lower shopping area, as well as restaurants and live/work units. This block will contain residential amenities at the fourth level and along the rooftop.
  • Building 3 would rise to 110 feet in height and contain 532 apartments above the table top, with 62,966 square feet of retail functions underneath, including potentially, a food market hall, restaurants. The tabletop area is due to contain outdoor amenities, including a swimming pool. The under-table areas are also being designed to contain apartments and up to 21 live/work units.
  • Building 4 will house 251 apartments, 17 live/work units and a 29,316-square-foot school. The planning document indicates the school program may exist in any number of configurations, including as a private or hybrid private/public school and will serve up to 300 K-12 students.
  • Building 5 will rise to 126 feet in height and will contain 253,514-square feet of office uses.
  • Building 6 would rise 58 stories to a maximum height of 732 feet and would include 186 condominiums, 260 hotel rooms and 7,020 square feet of retail that will share the below-table areas with residential and hotel lobby areas.
  • Building 7 will rise to 710 feet in height and will include 522 apartment units and 7,228 square feet of commercial areas.
The building is also due to contain a whopping 3,441 parking stalls, as well as 298 short term and 1,889 long-term bicycle parking spaces. Mia Lehrer & Associates will be providing landscape architecture services for the project, while AC Martin will serve as executive architect. 6AM is expected to be built in three phases starting around 2018.
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German architect Wilfried Wang critiques Herzog & de Meuron’s Museum of the 20th Century extension in Berlin

Herzog & de Meuron's winning proposal for the Museum of the 20th Century extension in Berlin has been called into question by German architect Wilfried Wang, the co-founder of Berlin-based Hoidn Wang Partner and (since 2002) the O’Neil Ford Centennial Professor at UT Austin's School of Architecture. Wang believes the Swiss firm’s design is severely lacking in both architectural and urbanist respects. Speaking in The Competition Project (whose editor translated Wang's commentary, which first appeared in the German journal Bauwelt last year), Wang first discusses the project's relationship with its immediate surroundings: Mies van der Rohe's Neue Nationalgalerie (completed in 1968) and the Hans Scharoun’s Berlin Philharmonic concert hall (completed in 1963).
By extending the form of this introverted structure to cover the entire competition site, little or no value is added to the immediate environs. To the contrary, that and the immense surfaces of the facades, right up to the edge of the pedestrian walkways, only serve to diminish the importance of the surrounding buildings. All the trees to the south of the site will disappear, and 90% of the outer walls of the building, regardless of the suggested use of porous brick detailing, are completely closed off.
Next in the firing line was the proposal's program:
The corridors stacked over one another, labeled “Boulevards” by the architects, are connected in the quadrants by smaller corridors and stairs. The metaphor, “Boulevard,” is as misleading as was Le Corbusier’s “rue intérieur.” Boulevards are accessible 24 hours a day as open public spaces. In the evenings these corridors will be closed to the public. Rectangular exhibit areas are placed on three levels—not easily accessible to the visitor as a result of the labyrinth-like circulation plan.
Wang wasn't too pleased with much of the competition's submissions either. Few, he argued, failed to mediate space between the two already existing icons that inhabit the vicinity. New York studios SO-IL, Snøhetta, and REX were in the running for the $218.8 million project, along with British firms Zaha Hadid Architects and David Chipperfield Architects.
The most extreme anti-urbanistic example honored by the jury with a merit award was OMA’s pyramid-like scheme, completely blocking any relationship between Mies and Sharoun by inserting their own icon in between the two.
By contrast, the shortlisted designs that entered the fray during the first open competition, Wang argues, were "more modern, sensitive, and led one to assume that a different solution would be in store." These notions did filter into the competition's final stage, said Wang, with SANAA and Sou Fujimoto's (both from Japan) less disruptive proposed interventions. Note: For his Master’s degree in 1981, Wang researched six cultural centers including London’s South Bank Centre, Paris’s Centre Beaubourg and Berlin’s Kulturforum. In 1992 he published a monograph on the work of Herzog & de Meuron.
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Take a drone tour of Herzog & de Meuron’s Hamburg concert hall before it opens

If you can't get to the grand opening of Herzog and de Meuron's Elbphilharmonie (Elbe Philharmonic) concert hall in Hamburg on January 11, then fear not. A drone tour is on hand to whizz you through and around the building, showing off the Swiss firm's breathtaking interiors. The drones explore the wooden circulatory areas, as well as the main concert hall which is clad with acoustic gypsum fiberboard panels. The waterfront complex features three concert halls, a plaza for public viewing that provides sweeping views across Hamburg, and 45 private waterfront apartments. The largest concert hall—with a capacity of 2,100—floats within the main building on 362 spring assemblies for further sound-proofing. Drones also travel outside the building which features a shimmering glazed facade and a dramatic wave-like roofscape, mimicking the nearby river Elbe. Here, audiences can take in and fully appreciate the 1,100 glass panes that comprise the facade from close-up views. With each panel measuring a minimum of 13 feet across, many have been spotted with small dark gray reflective dots. Some panels are curved to distort the facade's reflection of the river, thus creating a shimmering effect. Each panel is unique and individually crafted. While creating an appealing aesthetic, the reflective glass facilitates temperature regulation by reducing heat gains. Structurally, the building relies on the support of roughly 1,700 reinforced concrete piles: It’s located where a waterfront warehouse stood until the project began (though its brick facade is still there) just under a decade ago. Click here for the drone tour!
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Herzog & de Meuron’s Feltrinelli Foundation opens in Milan

Herzog & de Meuron's Fondazione Feltrinelli has opened up in the Porta Volta district of Milan on the via Pasubio avenue. The foundation is primarily a center for historical sciences, political, economic, and social research. Herzog & de Meuron's building will serve as the publisher's head office, being used for teaching, reading, meeting, and administrative purposes. Microsoft is also due to take up residency in February next year. On the outside, the project features bicycle and pedestrian paths along with a concrete courtyard sparsely populated with benches and trees. Concrete continues to dominate the space, being used in grid fashion for the building's structure—the glass facade is interrupted only by mullions and concrete floor plates. Subsequently, the interior has plenty of access to daylight ensuring adequate illumination. While differing in material from its 20th-century neighbors, the building references the surrounding historical vernacular through simplistic geometries and repetitive patterns on its facade. Inside, meeting rooms, classrooms, office space, and an extensive library and reading room can be found along with typical amenities including a cafe and reception area. The building will feature furniture from Unifor and bespoke designs from Herzog & de Meuron who worked with Italian furniture company Coima Image.
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Herzog & de Meuron win commission to design Royal College of Art campus in south London

Swiss Pritzker Prize winning duo Herzog & de Meuron has been awarded commission to design the $136 million Battersea South campus at the Royal College of Arts (RCA) in London. The firm saw off proposals from Diller Scofidio + RenfroStudio Gang, and four other finalists to win the design competition that called for a "strategic design approach to a new centre for the world’s pre-eminent art and design university’s Battersea campus." The 161,460-square-foot scheme will accommodate design studios as well as space for engineering, science, and technology. The scheme aims to coalesce these disciplines as the RCA sets its sights on becoming a STEAM-focused graduate university (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Maths/Medicine). The school also wishes to turn its research and knowledge exchange centers into "the domains of computer and materials science, the impact of the digital economy, advanced manufacturing and intelligent mobility." Part of Herzog & De Meuron's design sees the inclusion of a "hangar" space, capable of housing large-scale works and projects as well as interior planting. Pierre de Meuron, co-founder of the Swiss studio, said the RCA had set a challenging brief. He added that the Battersea site in south London offered "an opportunity to rethink the RCA campus and establish the patterns of connectivity and organization that will make a successful building."
Chair of the Architectural Selection Panel (ASP) and RCA Rector Dr. Paul Thompson remarked that Herzog & de Meuron was the "clear choice of the competition jury." Before a final shortlist (listed below) was selected, the RCA had received interest from 97 studios across the globe. The RCA on their website said that Herzog & de Meuron's submission "demonstrated a deep understanding of the potential for Battersea, making new connections and foreseeing the possibilities for sustainable place-making." The six runners-up in the competition are listed alphabetically: Christian Kerez (Switzerland) Diller Scofidio + Renfro (USA) Lacaton & Vassal (France) Robbrecht en Daem (Belgium) Serie Architects (UK/Singapore) Studio Gang (USA)
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Herzog & de Meuron win commission to design Berlin’s Museum of the 20th Century

Swiss firm Herzog and de Meuron, working with German landscape architects Vogt, has seen off competition from 41 other practices to design the Museum of the 20th Century in Berlin. New York studios SO-IL, Snøhetta, and REX were in the running for the $218.8 million project, along with British firms Zaha Hadid Architects and David Chipperfield Architects. Danish firm Lundgaard & Tranberg Arkitekter was announced as runner-up, while German practice Bruno Fioretti Marquez Architekten was awarded third prize. Back in November 2014, Germany’s parliament put aside 200 million euros for the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation and a new, much-needed building to show 20th-century art at the Cultural Forum (a collection of cultural institutions located at the edge of West Berlin). In September 2015, a competition was launched for a design strategy that would include the site layout, architecture, and landscaping of the museum. The Swiss firm's winning proposal depicts the museum extensively clad in brick, with a pitched roof spanning its entire length. Inside, the space will be divided into four parts with a sycamore tree being placed in the northeast quarter amid a restaurant area. With this space set among the galleries and art storage, the museum will become a place for art, meeting, and archival storage. Circulatory devices inside aim for crossovers between groups of visitors that wouldn't usually meet. Herzog and de Meuron explained: "The museum is the place where different paths cross, where different mentalities and worlds allow an encounter. It has several entrances, as it is oriented in all directions. It draws attention to the local collection of art." “Internationally significant art collections” will be on display, including the National Gallery’s Marx and Pietzsch collections, parts of the Marzona collection, and works from the Kupferstichkabinett (Museum of Prints and Drawings). The museum will also connect to the Mies van der Rohe-designed Neue Nationalgalerie through an underground tunnel. Speaking in a press release, Culture Minister Monika Grütters spoke of the jury process: “The great interest [in] the project shows that it is an attractive challenge for any renowned agency to build in this neighborhood."
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Herzog & de Meuron unveils 58-story tower along future L.A. light rail line

  Irvine, California-based developer SunCal has released details for a Herzog & de Meuron-designed, $2 billion development plan that aims to jumpstart the creation of a new skyscraper district on a 14.5-acre site at the southern edge of Downtown Los Angeles. The project, dubbed 6AM after its location on 6th Street, between Alameda and Mill Streets, would bring roughly 2.8-million square feet of mixed-use development to rapidly growing corner of L.A.’s booming Arts District. According to The Downtown News and Urbanize LA, the proposed development would entail 1,305 apartments and 431 condominiums in an area rapidly transitioning from low-rise industrial and DIY art gallery functions to something much more akin to a traditionally-developed, contemporary urban area. The project, which would be located directly on a proposed light rail extension running along Alameda from Union Station in Downtown L.A. to the south Los Angeles County community of Artesia, would mirror the intense, high-rise growth currently ongoing in the areas surrounding Downtown L.A’s rapidly-growing transit system, like those along the Expo Line corridor and on the northern edge of South L.A. between the Expo and Blue Lines. The development of the Artesia line would be contingent on the passage of the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Agency's Measure M ballot initiative this fall. Notable aspects of the project include a 430,000-square-foot hotel, 250,000 square feet of office space, a 29,000-square-foot school, 23,000 square feet of gallery space and 128,000 square feet of commercial space. Although the final configuration of the program and site are years away from being built, the addition of the educational and gallery components of the program mark a shift in tenor for the Downtown area, which has mostly seen an increase of luxury housing and associated commercial spaces in recent years. The addition of educational program could signal a transition toward a more holistic, neighborhood-style vision for the area separate from the consumption- and lifestyle-oriented developments that have marked Downtown L.A.’s recent development. Released information for the plan does not detail whether any of the housing units in the development will be affordable, however. The project itself is articulated as a grouping of parallel bars of mid-rise apartments, offices, and hotel blocks, much of which is lifted roughly forty feet above street level on a raised platform whose upper surface will be level with the cornice lines of nearby industrial buildings. Areas between the ground floor and this pedestal will contain commercial spaces services by exterior walking paths and leisure courts. The most daring aspect of the proposal entails a cluster of seven housing towers aligned along the length of Alameda, with the highest tower climbing to around 58-stories and a height of roughly 700 feet. Mia Lehrer & Associates will be providing landscape architecture services for the project, while AC Martin will serve as executive architect. 6AM is expected to be built in three phases starting around 2018. This story was first reported by the Los Angeles Times.
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Herzog and de Meuron’s shimmering Elbphilharmonie concert hall nears completion

Construction began in 2007 and now tickets have gone on sale for the opening season of shows at the Elbphilharmonie (Elbe Philharmonic) concert hall in Hamburg. Designed by Swiss practice Herzog and de Meuron, the building will be officially opened to public in the new year on January 11. Inside its concert halls, which are clad in acoustic gypsum fiberboard panels, equipment and furnishings are being installed in preparation for an official handover to venue operators on October 31. The complex features three concert halls, a plaza for public viewing that provides sweeping views across Hamburg, and 45 private waterfront apartments. The largest concert hall—with a capacity of 2,100—is detached from the rest of the building for further sound-proofing. Employing a shimmering, glazed facade and a dramatic wave-like roofscape, the concert hall does well to mimic the nearby river Elbe. 1,100 glass panes comprise the facade, with each measuring a minimum of 13 feet across, many of which were spotted with small dark gray reflective dots. As visible in the images above, some panels are curved. In fact, each one is unique and individually-crafted. While creating an appealing aesthetic, the reflective glass facilitates temperature regulation by reducing heat gains. Structurally, the building relies on the support of roughly 1,700 reinforced concrete piles: it's located where a waterfront warehouse stood until the project began just under a decade ago. "We are finally on the home stretch," Christoph Lieben-Seutter, general and artistic director of the Elbphilharmonie said in a press release. "The overwhelming interest for our advanced ticket booking shows the high level of anticipation for the Elbphilharmonie opening, not only in Hamburg, but also further afield." Those eager to see the venue before its 2017 opening can take a virtual tour available on the Elbphilharmonie website.
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LPC approves Herzog & de Meuron’s revamped UES megahome for Russian billionaire

Today the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) approved Herzog & de Meuron's plans to remake two Queen Anne–style townhomes and one neo-Federal-style home on the Upper East Side into a megahome for a Russian billionaire. The homes, on East 75th Street between Madison and Fifth Avenues, were originally designed by William E. Mowbray and built in 1887-89. One of the houses was redesigned in the Federal style in the early 1920s. For this renovation, New York–based Stephen Wang & Associates is the architect of record. The structures fall within the Upper East Side Historic District, and now belong to Roman Abramovich (estimated net worth: $8.1 billion), a sobering reminder that New York real estate is officially off-market for mere thousandaires. In April, the LPC had a mixed response to the architects' plans. Many members were unhappy with plans to convert neo-Federal rowhouse (number 11) into a Queen Anne–style home to match its neighbors, as the historic district recognizes both styles as historically significant. Today, the modified design responded to the LPC's feedback: The neo-Federal rowhouse keeps the style of its current facade (now boarded up thanks to uncompleted renovations by a previous owner), with minor alterations.     The whole suite of plans call for the replacement of the front facade of 11 East 75th Street, an excavation of the yards and cellar, the creation of totally new glass-fronted facade on the back of all three homes, a new rambling verdant wall, rooftop additions, and the removal of party walls. Herzog & de Meuron associate Olga Bolshanina noted that the structures themselves have been altered many times over the years, but that the firm's design "keeps the buildings looking like three separate buildings." A wrought-iron fence unifies the sunken front yards, and a gossamery metal main door at number 13 provided a touch that one LPC member described affectionately as "creative, in a discreet, limited way." The rear facade of the three buildings will be replaced by a wall of glass and bronze. Partner Wim Walschap described the updated design as "more or less the same, with a better relation between the garden and facade." Additions, like the large boulders flanking the pool, reference nearby Central Park. Commissioner Michael Goldblum offered kudos: "[the rear yard] is kinda cute, with the rock." The commission praised the revised designs almost uniformly. Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan called Herzog & de Meuron's design "incredibly responsive to what the commission was looking for. The approach is pro-preservation and restorative. The project has done what we were seeking."
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Herzog and de Meuron’s Tate Modern expansion set to open June 17

In 1995, Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron burst on to the scene winning commission to design the Tate Modern art museum in London. Their design, which saw the adaptive reuse of Giles Gilbert Scott's Bankside Power Station prompted surprise, not for what they did, but for what they didn't do. Retaining the industrial 20th century factory aesthetic, the building has come to compound the Tate's image as an artistic powerhouse under director Nicholas Serota. 4.2 million brinks comprise the building's facade, however, inside a vast central hall adds a theatrical aspect to the building. Speaking to architecture critic Rowan Moore of The Observer, de Meuron said that the hall was “not in the brief, there was no requirement to have it, but it was given by the building. It created a wholly new way of showing art.” http://uds.ak.o.brightcove.com/1854890877/1854890877_26518417001_Herzog-BC-640-ws.mp4 - “I don’t want to sound arrogant,” added Herzog after more than twenty years of reflection, “but that was a stroke of genius.” Whether you agree with him or not, him and de Meuron's success has garnered them international acclaim and now their latest foray at Bankside is taking shape. Due to open on June 17 this year, the firm's $377 million Tate Modern extension—known as the Switch House—will see a 60 percent increase in floor space for the institution. With work having started in 2007, the "extension" would have taken longer and cost more than their original work for the Tate.

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"In the proto-Blair era they were considered minimal, rarely straying from straight lines and right angles," writes Moore, though the Switch House instead relies on an oblique style showcased on a scale reminiscent to the likes of Claude Parent. Rising 213 feet to counter the iconic Bankside chimney and accommodating 11 floors, the angular structure will utilize a perforated brick lattice to match the existing structure.
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- Unlike with Scott's former power station, where Herzog and de Meuron made use of vertical fenestration, their new addition to the Tate will employ horizontal windows that partially wrap round the structure. The aspect of reuse however, will be maintained. Oil tanks that were originally used for the power station prior to its decommission in 1981 will become "closely associated with the new building" to preserve and further the rugged rough-edged charm that its sister structure has.
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A "vertical boulevard" will also be included in the extension. Coined as such by de Meuron, the space is essentially an oversized staircase that provides circulation to the new galleries embedded in the original power station. Larger space for temporary exhibits has also been catered for meanwhile the inclusion of the "Tate Exchange" will facilitate group discussion in seminar spaces and a Media Lab. “High attendance is fantastic for a museum but not always for you as a visitor,” said de Meuron. “Sometimes you need to be more quiet and peaceful. You need different experiences and different speeds, a variety of activity. The stairs are wider than we need them; we want to invite people to have a different kind of experience than to rush from one gallery to another. I am curious to see how people walk about it.”
Alternative circulation is a prominent them within the extension's design. New galleries will incorporate dead ends and others will be solo spaces all to prompt, as Moore explains, "random patterns of exploration, and unpredictable combinations of eddies and stillness." http://players.brightcove.net/e2d28453-3b98-45ec-a753-6574d2b2e050.mp4 Rising up through the building, a Members Room, Level 10 restaurant, and public terrace on the top floor will act as social hubs while offering expansive views over the thames, and as fellow critic Oliver Wainwright points out, into the pricey flats of Richard Rogers' Neo Bankside residences.