Posts tagged with "Grasshopper":

Among the Sequoias, a 3D-Printed Refuge by Smith|Allen

Smith|Allen's 3D-printed forest refuge is inspired by the site's patterning and historical cycle of deforestation and regeneration.

When Brian Allen and Stephanie Smith first visited the sequoia forest in Gualala, California, they saw patterns everywhere. “We were really intrigued by patterning at many scales, from bark on the trees to light through the trees and also, at a micro scale, [the cells of] the sequioas,” said Allen. Two months later the pair was back, this time with 580 sculptural bricks forming the world’s first 3D-printed architectural installation. Translucent white and 10 by 10 by 8 feet in size, Echoviren resembles a cross between a teepee and a tree stump, a mass made light by the organic porosity of the bricks. Echoviren is intimately tied to its site on the grounds of Project 387, the residency in which Smith|Allen participated last fall. Besides the sequioas’ patterning, the designers drew inspiration from the primitiveness of their surroundings. “The overall form was driven by what is the most basic space we could make,” said Allen. “It turns [out to be] just a small oblong enclosure with an oculus, a small forest hermitage.” The oculus draws the eye up, to the natural roof formed by the sequioas’ branches. In addition, Smith|Allen address the history of the site as a place where regrowth followed the trauma of deforestation. Built of bio-plastic, Echoviren has an estimated lifespan of 30-50 years. “The 50 year decomposition is a beautiful echo of that cycle” of deforestation and resurgence, said Allen. Smith|Allen took a flexible approach to Echoviren’s design, alternating between analog and digital tools. They used tracing paper to extract patterns from photographs of sequoia cells, then trimmed and propagated the patterning by hand. “We initially tried to do it parametrically in Grasshopper, to replicate that cell structure as a generative tool, but we weren’t getting good results,” explained Allen. “For us, the parametric tools were more of a tool set than a generator.” 
  • Fabricator Smith|Allen
  • Designers Smith|Allen
  • Location Gualala, California
  • Date of Completion August 2013
  • Material plant-based PLA bio-plastic, silicon adhesive
  • Process drawing, tracing, 3D printing, Illustrator, Rhino, Grasshopper, KISSlicer, snap fit, gluing, digging
Smith|Allen used KISSlicer to estimate the time required to print Echoviren, 10,800 hours in all. The designers ran seven consumer-grade Type A Machines Series 1 desktop 3D printers for two months straight. They used plant-based PLA bio-plastic, which in addition to being biodegradable, is also readily available. “We wanted to use something commercially available and easy to get our hands on,” said Allen. “The project was not about using inaccessible materials; accessibility gave us the tools to do this.” On-site assembly took four hours. Echoviren is a snap fit system, with dovetail joints in the XY and a pin and socket in the Z. Silicon adhesive secures each layer of bricks to the next. The bottom ring of bricks nestles within a hand-dug trench. Pyramidal in section, Echoviren is a compression structure. Its components vary in thickness from 6-8 inches at the bottom to less than an inch at the top. For Smith and Allen, the magic of Echoviren is twofold. First is the anticipation of the future, of the way the form will change as it decomposes. Just as important is how the installation came to be, how the technology of 3D printing enabled a firm of two to build Echoviren in less than a season. “As young designers, we struggle with getting our work out there and getting it built,” said Allen. “Using 3D printers, we’re able to really increase the amount of stuff we can do in a given time and transition it from a tool of prototyping and model building into real things.”

Situ Studio’s Sweet Food Truck

A social enterprise’s first mobile food entity uses design, mechanics, and hospitality to benefit incarcerated youths.

As the food truck craze continues to gain speed, it was only a matter of time before Brooklyn-based Situ Studio—one of the country’s premier design/build outfits—was tasked with creating a kitchen on wheels. But their opportunity to design and fabricate was not for just another rolling burger joint or mobile ice cream stand. The recently completed Snowday is the first food truck from Drive Change, a social enterprise that trains previously incarcerated youths to operate and manage roving restaurants. Situ Studio and Fabrication’s co-founder and partner Aleksey Lukyanov-Cherny said client Jordyn Lexton, Drive Change’s founder, had a strong vision for the program. Her business model calls for locally sourced ingredient themed menus. Snowday’s ingredient is Grade A maple syrup harvested in upstate New York. To relay the image of a cabin in the woods where one might refine the tree sap, she envisioned a raw, natural facade that was both organic and industrial.
  • Fabricator Situ Fabrication
  • Designers Situ Studio
  • Location Brooklyn, New York
  • Date of Completion December 2013
  • Material reclaimed cedar, reclaimed cedarwood, stainless steel connectors, bolts, 1/4-inch stainless steel, LED lights
  • Process Rhino, Grasshopper, laser cutting, table sawing, planing, sanding, chop sawing
Lukyanov-Cherny said designing a skin for a moving unit—in this case a former Con Edison vehicle—was challenging new territory. “When we started thinking of the project, we thought of a three dimensional, articulated facade,” he said. However, instead of complying with building codes the Situ team learned Transit Authority regulations, and how they could customize the appearance while fitting in the required envelope, in addition to practical matters like height restrictions, wear, and repair issues. In other words, an extended cantilever would not be reasonable for zipping through the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel. The facade also had to accommodate food service needs. The truck’s interior was gutted and retrofitted with an industrial, stainless steel kitchen by Shanghai Mobile Kitchen Solution, and a service component that extends to the truck’s exterior. So in addition to ease of repairs, the modular facade system had to adapt to both punctuated and continuous surfaces. “We wanted a flexible construction system that let you develop the facade for one application or another, that could be transformed for a building, or more architectural structure,” explained Lukyanov-Cherny. Situ Studio used Rhino to design a bespoke snowflake pattern for the truck, which supported Lexton’s brand visualization. The team chose reclaimed lumber as a material, both for its down-home aesthetic as well as its lightness. Planks of redwood and cedar with naturally worn patinas achieved variances in color without any additional treatment and a natural seal. Each plank was planed to 1 inch in thickness, so three layers made up a 3-inch additional depth on either side of the truck. To drive home the branding message, the truck’s name was laser cut from 1/4-inch stainless steel and backlit with LEDs. Each board was applied with stainless steel anchor points. Though it was not Situ Fabricataion’s first project for a non-profit organization, it was their first food truck and Lukyanov-Cherny said he looks forward to building more mobile units in the future. “We like to work with non profits because they’re open to new ideas, design, and approaches, which is so important to those companies,” he told AN. “A visionary client like this is inspiring to us.”

Perkins+Will Canada’s VanDusen Gardens Orchid

StructureCraft fabricates an orchid-shaped roof that supports vegetation and Living Building Challenge principles.

After serving patrons at one of Vancouver’s oldest botanical gardens for nearly 100 years, the VanDusen Gardens Visitors Centre had fallen dangerously into disrepair. Perkins+Will Canada conceived of a new, orchid-shaped center that meets CaGBC’s LEED Platinum ratings, and is the country’s first structure to target the International Living Building Challenge with features like geothermal boreholes, a 75-square meter photovoltaic array, and a timber roof that supports vegetation. To help fabricate the wooden structure to Perkins + Will Canada’s vision, the team contracted StructureCraft, a Vancouver-based design-build studio specializing in timber craftsmanship and structural solutions. Initial designs for the 19,000-square-foot building were delivered to StructureCraft as Rhino files. The uniquely shaped rooftop, which mimics an outline of the indigenous British Columbia orchid, had to be economically fabricated in a way that took net carbon effects into account. Within Rhino plugins—mainly Grasshopper—and with the help of strucutral engineers Fast + Epp, the StructureCraft team sliced the shape of the building into 71 long, curved panels of repeatable geometries. “Each curve is unique, so there’s a different radii for each beam,” said Lucas Epp, a structural engineer who worked on the project. “We optimized the global geometry of the roof so the radii of all the beams were in our fabrication tolerances but still achieved the architect’s desired aesthetic.”
  • Fabricator StructureCraft
  • Designers Perkins + Will Canada
  • Location Vancouver
  • Date of Completion October 2011
  • Material Glulam, FSC-certified plywood, thermal insulation and vapor barrier, thermal barrier, mineral wool, fabric, moisture barrier
  • Process Rhino, Grasshopper, Autodesk, sawing, nailing, gluing, pressing
Also within Rhino, the team integrated all of the building’s services into each of the panels. Since much of the piping and wiring for other trades like insulation, sprinklers, and electric utilize flexible formats and conduits, modularizing the panels significantly reduced site time from months, to weeks. And to protect the wooden structures, moisture barriers and closed-cell thermal insulation were applied throughout. The parametric model was then imported to Solids modeling software to develop a bespoke fastening system. StructureCraft used jig and table sawing methods to mill panels of Glulam, chosen for its flexibility and strength. Timber battens were affixed as cladding in sizes that were thin enough to naturally accommodate the curves of each panel. Solid timber support columns, carved on StructureCraft’s in-house lathe, taper at both ends to Perkins + Will Canada’s design specifications. Business development engineer Brian Woudstra, who worked on the project, attributed the accuracy of fabrication and the speed of installation to the expansive capabilities of parametric modeling. “We could model every joist, Glulam panel, and ceiling batten to help with conflict detection and feasibility,” he said. “We always prefabricate our projects in our shop, so it’s like a kit of assemblies that all clicks into place.”

Tex-Fab’s Rigidized Metal SKIN

A structural, textured metal system wins first place in a competition and the chance to develop a façade with Zahner.

Reinforcing the idea that time fosters wisdom, Nicholas Bruscia and Christopher Romano’s third iteration of a structural architectural screen was awarded first place in Tex-Fab’s digital fabrication competition, SKIN. According to Tex-Fab’s co-director, Andrew Vrana, the team’s 3xLP project was selected for its innovative façade system, which uses parametric design and digital fabrication. The 3xLP designers’ exploration of the relationship between academia and manufacturing merged at the University at Buffalo’s (UB) Department of Architecture. Starting their collaborative research with a digital model, Bruscia and Romano solicited the help of local manufacturer Rigidized Metals, (RM), who helped realize the second stage of the project’s evolution with two thin gauge metals featuring proprietary patterns. “The project is important because we’ve partnered so closely with Rigidized Metals,” Roman told AN. “We’ve brought digital and computational expertise, and they’ve provided material knowledge for textured metal—it’s a reciprocal team.”
  • Fabricator Rigidized Metals
  • Designers Nicholas Bruscia and Christopher Romano with Phil Gusmano and Dan Vrana
  • Location Buffalo, New York
  • Date of Completion October 2013
  • Material 1RL+4LB textured stainless steel, 16-20GA, steel bolts
  • Process Grasshopper, Lunchbox, Karamba, Rhino, AutoCAD, CNC Turret Punching, Hydraulic Press Brake humping, Tab/Bolt Connecting
Bruscia said the computational models were heavily informed by material parameters. Working with various patterns in RM’s product library, the team started to see various textures performing differently in structural applications, though the company’s metals are typically used in cladding or decorative applications. “Rigidized Metals’ patterns are stronger than flat metals,” Romano said. “That informed how we selected textures and which became a part of the computational conversation.” Drawn to the geometry of the embossed 4LB sheet, they found the low relief pattern to perform comparably to a deeply stamped-style, and that it complemented other chosen patterns nicely. Structural loading was tested in Karamba, an architect-friendly finite element method analysis plugin for Rhino that was developed recently in Austria. Designed primarily in Rhino 5 and Grasshopper, the team also wrote many of their own scripts. For the SKIN competition, the team adjusted porosity of the screen to increase transparency for façade applications. The screen’s pattern is articulated from all perspectives, creating a dynamic quality that is achieved by a slight twist through the entire structure. “The twist in the system is a result of us getting the geometry on the screen for the system to perform structurally, and to make it possible to fabricate,” Romano said. “Some geometric moves on the screen can be difficult to fabricate, so to remove those you get subtle twisting in the elevation.” At RM’s Buffalo facility, profiles of the system’s components were turret-punched on a CNC, and folded on a press break to achieve a diamond shape. A tabbing system was also milled so the shapes could be fastened with stainless bolts to form a seamless, continuous cell structure. As part of the SKIN competition, Bruscia and Romano will continue working with RM, as well as A. Zahner Company, to fabricate a façade system with a glazing component. The 3xLP team will exhibit their results at the Tex-Fab 5 event in Austin, Texas on February 19.

Facades+PERFORMANCE> Enroll and Learn About Performance Patterning & Envelope Design

(FACADES PERFORMANCE CHICAGO / COURTESY FACADES PLUS) To kick off AN and Enclos premiere conference, Facades + PERFORMANCE Chicago, Ronnie Parsons of Mode Lab will lead a technology workshop revolving around the concepts and mechanisms for creating performance-based parametric envelope systems using Grasshopper for Rhino5. Parsons is the founding partner of Mode Lab, a design consultancy focused on the development of products and environments for institutional and private clients. The class will cover the skills necessary for architects and designers to work with the latest analysis technologies that are transforming the ways in which they perform in their professional practice. Workshop attendees will acquire knowledge about parametric design within the building industry, will learn about concept development using parametric tools, and will be taught about the use of data as design parameter. Upon completion of the class, participants will receive a complimentary one-month subscription of Mode Lab. Don’t miss your chance to attend the numerous workshops, panels, and symposia hosted by Facades + Technology Workshops in Chicago. Enroll now!

Blurred Lines: SOFTlab and Cosentino

A new exhibition helps a New York-based firm explore indoor and outdoor applications of a new building material.

Cosentino is celebrating Architecture Month with Surface Innovation, a multi-media exhibition at the Center for Architecture in New York that presents innovative applications of its new Dekton material. A combination of raw, inorganic materials found in glass, porcelain, and natural quartz, the new indoor/outdoor surfacing material is made with particle sintering technology (PST) that recreates the natural process of stone formation. The company invited six local architecture firms to design unique projects featuring the material, including SOFTlab, a design/build firm known for its mix of research, craft, and technology in large-scale installations and building projects. For SOFTlab, working with a product that could be used for both interiors and exterior applications was an opportunity to reconcile the growing inverse relationship between the skin and volume of large buildings. “We came up with the idea of building something a little more dense than a single story or residentially scaled building, where Dekton may be used,” said Michael Svivos, founder and director of SOFTlab. “We went to a larger scale building, that blurs the inside and outside.”
  • Fabricator SOFTlab
  • Designers SOFTlab
  • Location New York
  • Date of Completion October 2013
  • Material paper, adhesive
  • Process Maya, Rhino, Grasshopper, laser cutting
Starting with the idea of a vertical atrium, which often includes biophilic elements like water features and indoor gardens, the SOFTlab design team envisioned an ATRIUn, a uniquely shaped building feature that uses the durability of Dekton’s stone-like properties to bring the outdoors in. ATRIUn is sponge shaped, and breaches the structure’s exterior at various points. “It forms an interior plaza in a building, not as something that’s flat, but spans the height, width, and depth of the building,” Szivos said. The form was generated in Maya. After inserting the apertures along the quadrilinear volume, the physics simulation plug-in generated the smooth, sinuous surface across various levels. For its larger projects, Szivos says the firm typically solves engineering challenges with Arup through an advanced finite software analysis software program. Those optimized, large designs are then sent to Tietz-Baccon, their long-time local fabricator. However for smaller projects where SOFTlab fabricates its own models and project components, the physics tool provides a close approximation of Arup’s services. To generate a model of ATRIUn’s design for the exhibition, the designers translated the Maya drawing into Rhino with Grasshopper to feed to their in-house laser cutter. Since the design was modeled in paper, four sided shapes were fabricated. If the design was realized in Dekton, triangular shapes would be necessary to achieve the complex curvature of the ATRIUn skin. The set volume was 24 by 24 by 36 inches, scalable for a building between 10 and 12 stories. ATRIUn and Surface Innovation is on view at the Center for Architecture in New York through October 31.

Get Hands on Experience with Cutting-Edge Technologies at Facades+ Performance

Attention all AEC students and professionals: AN and Enclos’ Facades+ PERFORMANCE Chicago, the premiere conference on high-performance building envelopes, is less than three weeks away! Don’t miss your opportunity to work side-by-side with the industry’s leading innovators in our series of full day, hands-on technology workshops, intimate dialogs, and engaging symposia October 24th- 25th. Gain the knowledge and skills to work with the latest in cutting edge design and analysis technologies that are revolutionizing contemporary architecture, and transform your professional practice. Registered architects can earn 8 AIA LU credits. Space is limited, so reserve your seat before it’s too late! Watch as Ronnie Parsons and Mode Lab-partner Gil Akos fielding questions about technology-enabled creative practice from their first livestream broadcast! Register today to join Ronnie Parsons, founding partner of Mode Lab, as he teaches you the mechanisms for creating performance-based parametric systems with Grasshopper for Rhino3D in his workshop, “Dynamic Patterning and Surface Design.”  With over 100 workshops under his belt over the past four years, Parsons is committed to sharing his passion for the innovative design technologies that are transforming the AEC industries through engaging, hands-on educational experiences. And don’t miss out as Mostapha Roudsari, Integrated Applications Developer for Thonton Tomasetti, explores the latest techniques for building envelope performance evaluation with Grasshoper in “Environmental Analysis for High Performance Building Envelope Design.” Be there as Mostapha shares his expertise in developing automated performance-drive design and optimized workflows in an intimate, classroom setting, and assemble the tools necessary to push your projects to the highest standards of performance. To learn more about these and other exciting workshops, panels, and symposia, head over to the full Facades+ PERFORMANCE site. Save the date: Facades+ PERFORMANCE, coming to Chicago, October 24th-25th!

Act Fast! Early Bird Rates For Facades+ PERFORMANCE Chicago Ends Today

blogbanner Calling architects, engineers, fabricators, consultants, and other design professionals: don’t miss your opportunity to join the industry’s leading innovators in our series of hands-on technology workshops and in-depth dialog workshops, only at the premiere conference for high-performance building envelopes – Facades+ PERFORMANCE Chicago, October 24th-25th! Register today to take advantage of our Early Bird Special and be ready to get your hands dirty with the latest tools and techniques that are changing the face of contemporary architecture. Join Jonathan Schumacher and Mostapha Roudsari of Thornton Tomasetti, Nathan Miller of CASE Design, Ronnie Parsons of Mode Lab, and other industry professionals for our full-day tech workshops, and gain the valuable skills necessary to deliver cutting-edge facades in today’s dynamic architectural landscape. Registered architects can earn 8 AIA LU credits as they catch up on the ever-evolving tools of the trade in the Mies van der Rohe-designed Illinois Institute of Technology’s Main Campus in Chicago, so don’t miss out! Following the series of stimulating presentations and lectures on day one of the conference, attendees will have the chance to choose from either two seminar-style dialog workshops or one of six daylong tech workshops, presented in conjunction with Mode Collective. In small, one-on-one, classroom settings, participants will gain the knowledge and skills to work with the latest in cutting edge design and analysis technologies to push your practice’s facades to the highest standards of performance. Learn the mechanisms for creating performance-based parametric systems and dynamic patterning with Grasshopper. Explore emerging techniques for the rationalitazion of envelope surfaces and the fundamental concepts of facade panelization and optimization with Galapagos and Kangaroo. Develop new skills for generating facade geometry, utilizing analysis information and managing complex parameters with Dynamo. Gain hands-on experience in the most up-to-date environmental analysis technologies to discover the next generation of high-performance building envelope design. All of this and more, more, more make AN and Enclos' Facades+ PERFORMANCE Chicago the event of the season for groundbreaking facade technologies. Our Early Bird special ends today, so sign up now to take advantage of this great deal. See you in Chicago!

Explore Environmental Analysis for High Performance Building Envelope Design at Facades+ Chicago

Banner_Workshop-Image_EnvironmentalAnalysis_615x105 Next month, AN is providing registered architects the opportunity to earn 8 AIA LU credits and the chance to collaborate with industry experts on practical projects at Facades+PERFORMANCE Chicago. Mostapha Roudsari of Thornton Tomasetti is leading one of six full-day tech workshops programmed for October 25th at the Illinois Institute of Technology, where he will investigate building envelope performance through hands-on tasks. For those with beginner level knowledge of Grasshopper, Roudsari will explore the relationship between building envelope performance and architectural design decision-making. Environmental Analysis for High Performance Building Envelope Design will involve a short introduction to the basics of building envelope performance evaluation, in addition to practical weather data analysis. Through a series of applications, this workshop will guide participants through an iterative method of understanding the issue, conducting design evaluations, setting up parametric models, leading environmental analyses, and drawing conclusions. Roudsari is an Integration Applications Developer at Thornton Tomasetti where he specializes in environmental building design and simulation. His diverse expertise allows him to create automated performance-driven design and optimization workflows by integrating advanced parametric modeling with environmental performance analysis and multi-objective optimization algorithms. Roudsari is the developer for Ladybug and Honeybee, two environmental plugins for Grasshopper that allow users to import and analyze weather data and run parametric environmental studies using RADIANCE, DAYSIM and EnergyPlus directly from Grasshopper3D. Register for Facades+ and learn more about Roudsari’s tech workshop.

PROJECTiONE’s Engrained Parametrics

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
 

Designers in Indianapolis fabricate a graphic, splintered design.

Indiana-based design/build studio PROJECTiONE employs a multidisciplinary approach to its work that runs the gamut from digital to analog fabrication. Founders Adam Buente and Kyle Perry craftily bridged that gap with Synthetic Grain, a set piece for the Young & Laramore advertising agency of Indianapolis that explores the natural knotting and grain of lumber. The team used parametric software to create a graphic, 3D pattern system for an architectural screen that mimics natural variations of wood. Working in Rhino, parallel lines—or the wood grain—were drawn and points were defined within. Each point served as a knot, around which the lines would gently curve. “Our only input for this project were those points in 3D space,” said Perry. To ready the design for fabrication, curves and cut holes for the plywood backing were generated in Grasshopper.
  • Fabricators PROJECTiONE
  • Designers PROJECTiONE
  • Location Indianapolis
  • Date of Completion February 2013
  • Material polystyrene, plywood, wood stain, steel, screws
  • Process Rhino, Grasshopper, laser cutting, friction fitting, screwing
Two hundred and eighty slats were laser cut from 4- by 8-foot sheets of polystyrene, including exacted “teeth” along the back of each fin that would slip into negative space scored into plywood backing. Because the screen was decorative, industrial plastics were a suitable project solution. “We needed something flexible so that the fins wouldn’t snap on us, and the pure white color really helped,” said Perry. Laser cutting also produced smooth edges that didn’t require any finishing. Though most of the tolerances were worked out digitally, the designers tested tolerances of the laser cutter with several mockups, and also determined how much of a bend could be applied before the plastic snapped. In addition to physical testing, line angles were also explored within Grasshopper. Since each fin was bent to the plastic’s inherent tolerance, enough tension was created to friction joint each fin into the wood. Eight plywood backing panels were also laser cut with varying curved edges to best optimize the curved patterns of the adjacent fins. A steel frame was fabricated to support the freestanding, 12-foot-long installation that reached 3-1/2 feet in height at a depth of 4 inches. The application for this installation of Synthetic Grain was predetermined, but Perry and Buente were not shortsighted in their plans for the future of the design. “We thought we’d make the Grasshopper definition variable,” explained Perry. “We tried to make it flexible enough to adjust ‘this’ and output ‘that’ quickly, so it could be scaled for a building typology.” At a grander scale, a building screen or parking garage facade could be fashioned from metals or thicker plastics. Retail storefronts could benefit from the visual transparency of the faux bois rhythms, or hospitality projects could adopt it as an alternative to a porous surface.

Facades+ Tech Workshop: Advanced Facade Panelization and Optimization Techniques

On October 25th, AN’s Facades+PERFORMANCE Chicago offers participants the chance to collaborate with industry experts on practical projects to cultivate valuable skills required for the delivery of ground-breaking facade technologies. Registered architects can earn 8 AIA LU credits by selecting one of six full-day, comprehensive workshops that take place in small, one-on-one, classroom settings. Lead by Jonatan Schumacher and Mathew Naugle of Thornton Thomasetti, the Advanced Facade Panelization and Optimization Techniques workshop is designed to discover distinctive systems for the rationalization of envelope surfaces for efficient fabrication, using a selection of plugins for Grasshopper. Participants will ascertain fundamental concepts of facade panelization, and optimization thereof, using Grasshopper’s optimization plugin Galapagos. Schumacher and Naugle will examine a number of cases for facade optimization using Galapagos before imparting an assortment of advanced panelization techniques using the dynamic relaxation plugin Kangaroo. Participants will delve into the TT Toolbox plugin, which will permit them to track the development of the design through various iterations with Excel. This workshop is catered for participants with beginner to intermediate knowledge of Rhino and Grasshopper. Personal laptops loaded with the required software—Rhino 5.0 Evaluation or SR3, Grashopper 0.9.0056, and Kangaroo Add-On for Grasshopper—are required to attend this technology workshop. Schumacher is the Director of Advanced Computational Modeling (ACM) at Thornton Tomasetti, where he has worked since 2010, with the goal to create new workflows and processes to enhance building design. He oversees and implements strategic developments related to integrated structural design, facade design, environmental analysis, and building information modeling. Naugle is an Integration Engineer at Thornton Tomasetti’s ACM group, where he focuses on instituting digital workflows catered to the company’s multifaceted modeling processes. He teaches and develops methods that utilize parametric modeling, interoperability, integrated analysis, BIM management, and geometry rationalization.

New Rhino Plugin, Ay-Karamba!

Brought to you with support from:
Fabrikator
 

A fellow at the Knowlton School of Architecture expounds on the work of Le Ricolais with a new plugin for Rhino.

For Justin Diles, Ohio State University’s KSA LeFevre fellowship was a fateful progression of past experiences and ongoing professional work. While studying under Cecil Balmond at the University of Pennsylvania, Diles encountered hand-built models that Robert Le Ricolais constructed with his students in the 1960s. “Le Ricolais built models with his students for 20 years,” said Diles, “and one that I found he had built out of tubular steel and loaded to failure. It produced a really beautiful deformation pattern.” Two years later, Diles was teaching at the University of Applied Arts Vienna in the master class studio of Greg Lynn. While in Austria, he met Clemens Preisinger, a developer who, with support from Klaus Bollinger’s firm Bollinger Grohman Engineers, wrote a new plugin for Rhino called Karamba. The plugin is an architect-friendly, finite, element analysis method that delivers fast, intuitive graphic information, along with the requisite numbers. The plugin would figure heavily in Diles’ fellowship work.
  • Fabricators Justin Diles
  • Designers Justin Diles
  • Location Columbus, Ohio
  • Date of Completion April 2013
  • Material Styrofoam, Plaster of Paris, Duratec StyroSheild, marine-grade gel coat, resin, chopped E-glass fiberglass, paint
  • Process Rhino, Karamba, Grasshopper, CNC milling, sanding, painting
When he arrived in Ohio, Diles’s work progressed along two parallel tracks: The first was developing a computational design component with a formal vocabulary of the structural deformation Le Ricolais’ model. The second was developing a material capable of realizing the design. In Karamba, Diles augmented a tectonic simile from le Ricolais’s latticed models as surfaces for fabrication with composites. “That was an ah-ha moment for me,” said Diles. “I began taking a single assembly and ran it through multiple iterations of buckling deformations.” Diles layered multiple deformations into patterns that produced a puzzle of nesting components. Black and white coloring helped him track the layers and lent a graphic, architectural appeal. After the design was finalized, Diles made a series of molds from lightweight Styrofoam. “It was interesting because it’s usually a junk material and, in a way, has a very bad reputation as a material,” he said. “But it’s recyclable and can hold a tremendous amount of weight and is easily worked on a CNC mill.” A 3-axis mill generated components of a mold, which were taped together and sealed with Plaster of Paris to prevent resins of the composite from bonding to the foam. “We used a lot of tricks from Bill Kreysler’s fabrication shop,” said Diles. The final mold was sealed with Duratec StyroSheild. Diles and his team coated the mold with layers of different materials, not knowing exactly how the final components would safely release from the cast. An outermost layer of marine-grade gel coat was applied to the mold and roughly sanded so a chopped E-glass fiberglass reinforcement could be affixed to it with resin. Since fiberglass is a lightweight material, about three layers were built up to realize the final 11 1/2- by 6-foot form. Convex white sections and hollow black pieces were friction-fitted, sans glue, with maximum gap spaces of only 1/32-inch.