Posts tagged with "Furniture Design":

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Gallery Gabriel & Guillaume takes on New York in grand style

Untethered to a fixed brick and mortar space in one city or another, a nomadic gallery has the advantage of setting up (temporary) shop in some of the most emblematic locales. Whether their wears feature prominently at an exhaustive list of fairs, in storied buildings, or in recently completed real estate projects, this type of platform often enters into and benefits from, win-win situations. These purveyors sell better when showcasing their collections in aptly-decorated contexts while the proprietors of these sumptuous settings can promote their venues more holistically. For the arbiters of historic palaces and stately homes, this type of program represents the chance to recontextualize and, in turn, shed new light on often forgotten sites. For developers of new residential projects, this type of arrangement puts a spin on the timeworn practice of open houses and helps their real estate agents sell more units. Brightening up a dreary, albeit warm, New York January is a special exhibition mounted by Beirut and Paris-based collectible design gallery Gabriel & Guillaume. Staged in the penthouse of the SHoP Architects and Studio Sofield-restored 111 West 57th Street building in Midtown Manhattan, the L'Œi'l du Collectionneur showcase brings together an eclectic array of historical and contemporary furnishings, presented in various domestic vignettes. The atypical initiative was conceived by marketing agency frenchCALIFORNIA, in partnership with JDS Development Group, Property Markets Group, and Spruce Capital Partners. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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MUT Design breaks spatial barriers at imm Cologne

For the past nine years, stalwart furniture fair imm Cologne has mounted the Das Haus program: an annual walk-in home simulation and fair booth installation conceived by some of the most promising designers of the day. Since 2012, recognized talents like Todd Bracher, Luca Nichetto, Neri&Hu, Sebastian Herkner, and Louise Campbell have been invited to develop their own interpretations. Incorporating contemporary furnishings and finishes in a custom and experimental set design, each iteration of the Das Haus has illustrated one or more visions for the future of domestic life and interior design. Part practical and part speculative, the program provides a platform for an up-and-coming or mid-career designer to showcase and solidify their individual approach to the field. This year, the German fair called on emerging practice MUT Design to develop a Das Haus concept that blurs the boundaries between indoor and outdoor space. The Spanish duo—Alberto Sánchez and Eduardo Villalón—champions of an emotive approach to design. Evident in an abundant gamut of boldly-colored, richly-textured, yet cleverly minimal products, MUT Design's mastery of composition and geometry is only matched by its understanding of materiality and visual impact. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Omar Sosa gets comfortable at Friedman Benda

One's threshold for discomfort can vary widely as can their need for comfort. Conditioned by external forces, these psychological extremes have a strong impact on the behavior, identity, and the social norms we adopt. Collective expectations of convenience and satisfaction often mirror economic and societal shifts. In the past, we might have been unknowingly content to live without the amenities we've grown accustomed to since. Exploring the split between comfort and discomfort through a visual, material, and referential lens, Omar Sosa mounts the Comfort exhibition at the Friedman Benda gallery, on view until February 15. The cofounder and creative director of maverick interiors publication Apartamento was commissioned by the collectible design platform as part of its annual guest curator program. In his research, Sosa sought to investigate comfort's correlation with aesthetics, and the tension that occurs between the visual and physical properties of utilitarian objects, sculptures, photographs, and paintings. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Jacques Tati's Villa Arpel takes the cake at Design Miami

Perhaps the most seminal of seminal French filmmaker Jacque Tati's epochal projects, Mon Oncle (1958) tells the story of Monsieur Hulot. The film follows him as he comes to terms with modern life; postwar France's infatuation with mechanical efficiency and mass consumption. In true Tati fashion, set design, lighting, sound, and visual effect played a vital role in this movie, more so than actual dialogue. Some might argue that Tati's true skill was in architecture and design. At the center of Monsieur Hulot's noble and comedic struggle is the Villa Arpel, a domestic mise-en-scene, and protagonist that emulates if not exaggerates these period-sensitive conditions. Set behind a garden of geometrically-puzzled grass patches and colored stone walkways, a boxy home takes on a life of its own. Its frontal, circular windows become watchful eyes while a whole host of dysfunctional gadgets and appliances puts Monsieur Hulot through a series of running gags. This particular home, set in a fictitious suburban development outside of Paris, is indicative of a society or new generation that favors style over substance. Paying homage to this absurdist and satirical masterpiece, New York gallery Les Atelier Courbet teamed up with architecture practice Thirwall Design to conceive the Please Be Seated installation during last week's Design Miami. Coinciding with the release of Taschen's comprehensive monograph Jacques Tati: The Complete Work, the fair booth showcase was mounted for the US launch of three limited-edition furniture designs, the French studio Domeau & Pérès extracted from the film and reproduced. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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New York gallery fair Salon Art + Design seeks to attract a younger audience

Taking over New York's Park Avenue Armory for its eighth edition this November, prestigious gallery fair Salon Art + Design is seeking to draw in a younger collector base. Though exhibiting galleries have been charged with presenting more affordable pieces, this year's offering of both vintage and contemporary wares promises to elate all tastes. A far more restrained and arguably refined offering than other somewhat boisterous gallery fairs that dot the annual calendar, the Salon Art + Design (November 14 to 18) brings together a highly select group of 56 collectible and vintage design galleries from around the world. Taking center stage this year are Paris's Galerie BSL—presenting Pia Maria Raeder's wonderfully ornate yet organically-formed Stardust benches and mirrors—newcomer WonderGlass—the independent practice's Venetian-inspired glass sculptures—and Cologne's ammann// gallery—showing new large-scale prints by famed Swiss architecture photographer Hélène Binet. New exhibitors this year include galleries from Russia, Brazil, and Lebanon. Objects range from an ancient bust circa 1000 BC to the newest trends including work made from a 3D printer. Other notable exhibitors will include Demisch Danant, Friedman Benda, Gallery FUMI, The Future Perfect, David Gill Gallery, Giustini / Stagetti, Cristina Grajales Gallery, Heller Gallery, J. Lohmann Gallery, Maison Gerard, Todd Merrill Studio, Sarah Myerscough Gallery, Nilufar Gallery, Patrick Parrish Gallery, Priveekollektie, Adrian Sassoon, Twenty First Gallery, and more. Read the full show evaluation on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Friedman Benda recaps Gaetano Pesce's defining moment

A revelatory presentation of the experimental designer Gaetano Pesce is on view at Friedman Benda through December 14. Age of Contaminations is a carefully selected historical sweep provides a close reading of the idiosyncratic designer’s practice over 27 crucial years of the Italian architect's career, beginning with the asymmetrical, modular Yeti Armchairs (1968) and concluding with the otherworldly Ghost Lamps (1995), where recycled paper and polyurethane has been molded into a vaguely figural silhouette. Referencing an early peak of Pesce’s career, the title Age of Contaminations is borrowed from the artist’s installation in The Museum of Modern Art’s historic 1972 exhibition Italy: The New Domestic Landscape, where the designer conceived works for a post-apocalyptic future where humans have settled into subterranean cities to escape an unidentified fallout on the surface. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated e-catalog available for free on the gallery’s website, wherein leading authority on craft and design history Glenn Adamson provides a chronological survey and impassioned critique of Pesce’s career. Perhaps the most interesting designs on view are the least aesthetically pleasing: Dacron-filled fiberglass cloth chairsGolgotha (1972)—resemble the functional version of a Piero Manzoni painting, and the garish, slick palette of his Golgotha Table (1972) provides a visually grating yet conceptually transcendent testament to Pesce’s Roman Catholic upbringing. The designer’s relentless openness to experimentation and earnest resistance to a consistent style is manifest in one of the more striking works in the exhibition is the monumental Moloch Lamp (1971), deftly placed behind one of the gallery space’s pillars, allowing it to make an even more powerful impact once visitors are confronted with it in closer proximity. Pesce’s most famous design, the Up5 (Donna) chair and Up6 footstool make a requisite appearance just beneath the lamp’s intense metallic glow. The chair, which resembles the breasts or buttocks of the female body, is tethered to its spherical footstool, mimicking a prisoner’s ball and chain. A recent demonstration by the feminist group Non Una Di Meno (Not One Less) during Milan design week expressed explicit opposition to the design, yet Pesce insists that the work was intended to emphasize the restrictions of femininity in order to spur debate, rather than uphold traditional values pertaining to gender. Read the full show recap on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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AN Interior interviews five interior and furniture design practices to watch

Every year a new class of professionals storms the scene. We sifted through the perspectives and personalities to find the five up-and-coming interior practices and designers that should be on your radar. Atelier Barda Montreal For the six studio members of Atelier Barda, architecture is an intuitive art form shaped by precedents from design and other creative practices. Many of the studio’s projects are subtly suffused with allusions to the fine arts: White tiling in the SSENSE Headquarters recalls Jean-Pierre Raynaud’s gridded installations; the Résidence Villeneuve’s storefront living space evokes Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks; and the Gauthier House takes its inspiration from the minimalism of Ellsworth Kelly and Robert Mangold—two favorites of the clients. References to art history are testaments to more than just aesthetic interest. According to studio director Kevin Botchar, Atelier Barda “works through artistic and cinematographic references because they’re part of a collective unconscious.” They may also reflect the studio’s broader effort to achieve a more enduring kind of design. As Botchar put it, “We are in search of a sort of timelessness in our projects.” NILE New York City NILE’s project is modernism, which at first seems a curious choice in 2019. But according to the New York-based firm’s founder, Nile Greenberg, the original ethos and ideas of prewar modernism can be easily applied to today’s context. “Beauty, function, and politics are all the same thing,” Greenberg told AN. “I love the Smithsons’ phrase ‘loving neutrality.’ If a space is neutral, it can be anything for anyone.” Like that of Mies and early Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, NILE’s modernism takes universal qualities and tailors them to specific people or situations, hence the word loving. Neutrality, rather than minimalism, which is frequently restrictive, allows flexibility for individuality against a background free of identity. In an age when inclusivity and openness are being advanced in all arenas of culture, NILE looks to the democratic ideals of modernism to define new ways of living in the 21st century. A veteran of MOS, SO – IL, and Leong Leong, Greenberg has completed a store for clothing retailer 6397 in downtown Manhattan and a house in Denver, and this fall two books will hit the shelves: The Advanced School of Collective Feeling, by Greenberg and Matthew Kennedy, and Two Sides of the Border, which Greenberg coedited with Tatiana Bilbao. Click through to our interiors and design website at aninteriormag.com to read all five interviews.
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R & Company's Chairs Beyond Right & Wrong exhibit surveys fresh interpretations of the typology

As perhaps one of the most ubiquitous design archetypes, one that can make or break a talent's career, the chair has been reinterpreted over and over again. As both a canvas for the articulation of changing trends and the expression of bold personal or political statements, this typology often represents the complexity of the design medium itself. A few brave souls have even gone so far as to push beyond its essential function and to challenge the conventions of what distinguishes art from design. Cueing into the rich plethora of content and subsequent fodder this object has engendered, New York gallery R & Company has just opened the Chairs Beyond Right & Wrong show at its White Street location (through October 19). Curated by Raquel Cayre, the force behind the widely recognized Instagram account @ettoresottsass and the 2018 Memphis-inspired Raquel’s Dream House showcase, the group exhibit brings together an eclectic and diverse range of both commissioned and existing pieces by 50 international designers. Cayre's curatorial focus looks at how the archetype and its corresponding forms of use and composition have been reconsidered as formal objects, products, structures, symbols, and as a material in its own right. Producing new work for the exhibition, participating talents were invited to explore how these ideas contribute to an expanded notion of the chair while challenging the categorical divisions that often pigeon hole it into marginalized roles. The title of the show references the work of Seth Price, whose interdisciplinary use of diffusion, manipulation, and narrative channel into strategies and arrangements found in the exhibition. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Dutch furniture label Lensvelt opens a penthouse showroom in Antwerp, Belgium

Where better to showcase bespoke furniture than in-situ? For maverick Dutch label and design firm Lensvelt—purveyor of limited edition classics by top talents like Piet Boon, Willem Hendrik Gipsen, Wiel Arets, Tejo Remy, Studio Job, Richard Hutten, Piet Hein Eek, Marcel Wanders, Maarten Van Severen, Maarten Baas, Ineke Hans, and Gerrit Rietveld—a converted warehouse loft seems appropriate. Set on the top two floors of a listed late-19th-century depository, along Antwerp's trendy Godefridus quay, the sprawling 500-square-foot attic space plays host to a set of interior stagings, showcasing pieces from the brand's extensive collection. Lensvelt CEO Hans Lenvelt first acquired and converted the property in 1997 with the help of Delft-based architecture firm Fokkema & Partners, but it wasn’t till 22 years later that he decided to transform the space into a live-in showroom. At the time of purchase, the surrounding area was still a gritty port and, as Lensvelt describes, “populated by Eastern European truck drivers looking for a good time.” Since then, the neighborhood has become one of the Belgian “fashion city’s” trendiest districts. The celebrated MAS Museum and designer Dries van Noten are notable residents. After having visited over 20 warehouses, this locale piqued his interest. Regardless of the neighborhoods seedy reputation, the loft’s aesthetic reminded him of the office decor in a Donald Sutherland film he had recently seen and enjoyed. With that direct emotional reference and other key attributes: size, material, proximity, Lensvelt was sold and maintained the space as a private residence for over two decades. Read the full story on our interiors and design site, aninteriormag.com.
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Hem collaborates with designers to benefit Los Angeles’s design community

In concurrence with the Los Angeles Design Festival, Stockholm-based design brand Hem hosted a festival to celebrate and give back to L.A.’s design community. Hem Fest took place on June 22, 2019, at the Hem and Madera LA Showroom in Los Angeles and featured a variety of activities including a raffle auction, a ping-pong-table-turned-work-station, and stick-and-poke tattoos. The main event starred a raffle auction of reimagined Max Lamb “Last Stools” designed by a pre-selected group of eight local architects and designers: ETC.etera, Kelly Wearstler, LA-Más, Oliver M. Furth, Rapt Studio, Snøhetta, The Archers, and wHY Objects. The proceeds from ticket sales go to LA-Más’ mission to “envision a world where city growth is equitable and self-directed—where the best local solutions are brought to a city-wide scale.” Read the full story on our interiors and design site, aninteriormag.com.
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Robert McKinley curates a shoppable bungalow in Montauk

Planning to join the herds of New Yorkers that'll head "out east" this summer. You might want to opt out of the standard sharehouse and book a stay at this thoughtful-designed beach bungalow instead. Located at the end of Long Island's South Fork, beyond the pricey Hamptons, this Montauk residence was just recently renovated and outfitted by celebrated interior design firm Studio Robert McKinley, to serve as both a weekend getaway and integrated showhome. The light, lime-washed white-wall, four-bedroom, ranch-style home features a carefully curated selection of furnishings, fixtures, finishes, and accessories that are all for purchase. The overall scheme reflects McKinley's sensibility while also paying homage to the locale's coastline and evoking the aesthetics of renowned seaside resorts in Europe. This Montauk home can be rented as of today. Read the full story on our interiors and design site, aninteriormag.com.    
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Valentin Loellmann's first New York solo show is an exercise in restrained artisanal experimentation

The careful fusing of natural wood and cast bronze produces a happenstance burnt-finish that craft-led designer Valentin Loellmann embraces when creating bespoke furniture pieces. In fact, the Maastricht-based German artisan rarely begins a new piece based on preliminary sketches. Rather, he allows the material and a bit of experience-driven technical expertise to drive his process. Though Loellmann composes sculptural works with a tabula rasa approach, they often take on the shape and reference of furniture archetypes: a Shaker-style chaise-lounge, airplane-wing-like bench, monolithic table, towering armoire, amoebic ladder, strategically-jointed chair, and even a semi-circular staircase. Currently on view at New York’s Twenty First Gallery, in partnership with Paris-based collectible design purveyor Galerie Gosserez, Loellmann’s first solo show in this city, presents a robust selection of monumental pieces, all somehow coated in a layer of iridescent copper or cast bronze. Patinated surfaces and marble slabs are encapsulated in organically-carved yet suggestively-angular dark wooden frames. Read the full story on our interiors and design site, aninteriormag.com.