Posts tagged with "Figment":

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City of Dreams Pavilion brings artifacts of the agro-industrial age to New York City

Architecture studio Austin+Mergold has teamed up with artist Maria Park and students from Cornell University to produce Oculi, this year's City of Dreams Pavilion on Governors Island in New York City. The design was the winner of the annual City of Dreams competition aimed at promoting sustainability in architecture and design. It's on view now through October 31. The installation features a field of elevated oculi made from 40-year-old metal grain bins procured from a farm in Delphos, Ohio. The oculi frame unobstructed views of the sky while tracking the path of the sun with a range of shadow patterns. The interior walls of the bins are painted in shades of blue that correspond to the changing colors of the sky throughout the day. “Artifacts of the American agro-industrial age, these bins have been repurposed in ways not unlike how medieval inhabitants of Rome reoccupied the remains of the Ancient Empire,” explained the studio in a statement. They compare the grain bin with “spolia,” a term for ancient stone that has been repurposed in new construction. The City of Dreams Pavilion is now a gathering place for visitors to enjoy performances and lectures. Following the de-installation, the bins will be reused as materials for an experimental housing cluster in Central New York. The competition was organized by FIGMENT, the Emerging New York Architects Committee (ENYA) of the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter (AIANY), and the Structural Engineers Association of New York (SEAoNY). For Oculi, the architects and artist collaborated with consulting engineers Chris Earls and Scott Hughes.
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Van Alen Institute’s spring festival focuses on getting around New York City

New York City subways and buses serve eight million riders per weekday. However, the transit system that many New Yorkers rely on encounters frequent delays and suspensions. As a response, New York-based Van Alen Institute will bring together city planners and participants to imagine new approaches towards seeing, navigating, and moving through the urban environment, with a series of events ranging from bus and bike tours to a flash design competition, from June 17 to June 23. The Van Alen-organized spring festival, "FLOW! Getting Around the Changing City" seeks to rethink the consequences of the 15-month-long L-train shutdown, among other transit issues in New York City. They will host “The Williamsburg Challenge,” where participants will test out what it’s like to travel from Union Square to Williamsburg without using the L train. The institute has also invited professional teams to propose creative solutions to solve the over-ground congestion created by the L train shutdown, in a one-night-only design competition. On June 20, AN’s very own Assistant Editor Jonathan Hilburg will moderate the talk, “Mind the Gap: Improving Urban Mobility through Science and Design." Participants include author Susan Magsamen, Perkins + Wills Associate Principal Gerald Tierney, Gehl Studio Associate Julia Day, and Multimer Strategy Associate Taylor Nakagawa. Other events include an East Village-to-Harlem bus tour led by sociologist and author Garnette Cadogan, a four-hour Brooklyn bicycle tour, a screening of the William Holly Whyte-produced The Social Life of Small Urban Space, and an interactive Urban Mobility Variety Show at Figment NYC featuring dance, music and other performances. Check out this link for a full schedule and tickets.
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This pavilion made from thousands of old clothes hangers will cast fractal shadows on Governors Island this summer

The day after New York City’s first snowstorm (albeit a miniature one), allow yourself to day-dream about visiting the City of Dreams Pavilion on Governors Island during a breezy summer's day in 2016. The competition, hosted by FIGMENT, the Emerging New York Architects Committee (ENYA) of the AIA New York (AIANY), and the Structural Engineers Association of New York (SEAoNY), hopes to “Focus on the future of a world that faces strains on both economic and natural resources, aims to promote sustainability-oriented thinking amidst the architecture and design communities.” A jury reviewed over 100 design proposals and selected four finalists. Each team then had a month to further develop their projects based on comments form the jury. The winner for the sixth annual installation has been announced as Hanger Barn by Folio. The firm's design “turns recycled clothes hangers into a pavilion using modular design techniques," according to a statement from FIGMENT. "It also creates the illusion of motion due to the placement of the hangers in fractal patterns, which create shadow effects on the ground below that change with the movement of the sun. The modular design is composed of the hanger’s original triangle shape, rotated and paired with mirrored segments that connect with zip ties. The intention is for the materials to be reused after disassembly at various sites around New York City.” The three additional finalists included: Catch Me if You Can by Multiply (Armand Devillard, Victor Diaz Ortega, and Nicolas Moser) According to FIGMENT:

The pavilion is an evocation of childhood memories: a large corn field sheltered under a light canopy, where visitors can relive a first hidden kiss, a game of hide and seek, a nap, or a racing slalom through twisting paths. The pavilion will use slalom gates, which are useless during summer, borrowed from a ski resort outside NYC and returned for the next ski season.

Nooks and Granny Squares by Crystal Collado and Kara Vujanovich According to FIGMENT:

Nooks and Granny Squares invites visitors to experience different spaces created by dome-shaped structures and a tactile skin. The main public space, formed by two large domes, allows visitors to gather in the shade and enjoy a performance. The crocheted skin is comprised of panels made up of recycled plastic bags and separates a semi-private interconnected cove from the main space, while partially open to the views of Governors Island. The nook, independent from the other domes, functions as a snug and private space for up to four people. Open and closed weaves allow light to filter into the pavilion during the day and escape at night, creating memorable moments at any time of the day.

Pneu Pavilion by Nicholas Bruscia, Christopher Romano and Daniel Vrana w/ Alessandro Traverso and Martina Mongiardino (Absolute Joint System) According to FIGMENT:

The Pneu Pavilion is a lightweight, air filled structure suspended at varying heights to create a smooth gradient between tall and short spaces, accommodating a wide range of age groups and activities. The tensile structure is made entirely from demountable and reusable structural components, while the inflated structural pillows are built from recycled vehicle inner tubes contained within layers of porous mesh.  The air pressure in the skin allows the thin material to achieve the large span between the lenticular cable trusses, providing a soft surface that encourages viewers to interact with it, while the repeating pillow-like forms give the canopy a cloud-like appearance.

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Broken umbrellas and bicycle wheels get a second life in these two, completely recyclable pavilions on Governors Island

Two whimsical summer pavilions on New York City's Governors Island have been slated for reuse elsewhere, themselves built from recycled and repurposed materials. The Billion Oyster Pavilion by BanG Studio and the Organic Growth Pavilion by Izaskun Chinchilla Architects both tied as winners in the annual City of Dreams design competition, and the jury, torn between the two, greenlighted both pavilions, launching a dedicated Kickstarter campaign to crowdfund their construction. The pavilions will soon reincarnate as decorative chandeliers, sun canopies, and oyster beds. Conceptualized for this very purpose, the Billion Oyster Pavilion is made from nylon rope, steel rebars, clamps, and custom cast-concrete blocks, and will form part of a Governors Island high school’s years-long initiative to restore oyster beds in the New York Harbor. Serving as a natural water filter, oyster beds would help vastly improve water quality. Meanwhile, the Organic Growth Pavilion also flags garbage as an epidemic while aiming to recontextualize waste as a resource. Fabricated from broken umbrellas, bicycle wheels, and old stools, it forms a series of plant-like structures in a collective canopy measuring 1,223 square feet. The canopy will be broken up and distributed to sites across the city for use as decorative chandeliers or smaller shade structures. “The jury saw that the Billion Oyster Pavilion and Organic Growth were both incredibly interesting designs that interpret the competition brief in completely different ways,” said David Koren, executive producer of Figment, a non-profit organization that organizes the City of Dreams competition with the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter’s Emerging Architects Committee. “Perhaps we can create some really exciting dialogue around temporary architecture and sustainability.”
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Kickstarters launched for FIGMENT’s two Governors Island installations

As AN wrote in January, New York City's FIGMENT selected not one but two projects for this year's annual art installation at Governors Island. But here's the thing, neither of these pavilions are going to be realized without significant funds being raised. So, naturally, Kickstarter campaigns have been launched for the Billion Oyster Pavilion and the Organic Growth Pavilion. Check out the two videos below to learn more about each project, and if you feel so inclined, maybe throw in some cash. The Organic Growth pavilion is trying to hit its $20,000 goal in 31 days and the Billion Oyster Pavillion hopes to raise $22,000 in the next two weeks.
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FIGMENT can’t decide, unveils two 2015 Governor’s Island pavilion winners

Thanks to an indecisive jury, FIGMENT’s annual City of Dreams Pavilion Competition will result in not one, but two—count 'em, two—art installations at Governor’s Island this summer. Apparently, after four hours of deliberating the jurors couldn't pick between between two finalists so they decided to just go with both. The Billion Oyster Pavilion by the Long Island City–based BanG Studio draws from the New York Harbor School’s Billion Oyster Project—which partners with the Governors Island Alliance—to restore one billion live oysters to the New York Harbor. Drawing from materials used in the school’s work, the pavilion’s woven canopy is made of steel rebar, nylon rope, and hose clamps. The base of the pavilion has custom-cast “Reef Balls,” which are a sort of restoration device that can be used to create oyster habitats. After the summer season, BanG Studio’s pavilion will be donated to the Harbor School and its materials will be given new use on the island. The Organic Growth Pavilion (top) comes from Izaskun Chinchilla Architects of Madrid and London and is said to be inspired by flowers that can actively respond to the natural environment—like hydrangeas. To replicate that type of responsiveness, Izaskun Chinchilla uses broken objects like umbrellas, stools, and bicycle wheels and crafts them into flower-like structures. As with the Billion Oyster Pavilion, the materials used in Organic Growth can be reused after the pavilion is dismantled. The designers envision the broken umbrellas and larger elements from the pavilion as sun and shade protection devices for public spaces in New York or as decorative chandeliers. As exciting as it may be to get two pavilions this summer, nothing is a done deal quite yet because of, you guessed it, cost. To raise funds for the two pavilion, FIGMENT is accepting donations and a Kickstarter will likely be launched sometime soon. The competition is a joint effort of FIGMENT, the Emerging New York Architects Committee (ENYA) of the American Institute of Architects New York Chapter (AIANY), and the Structural Engineers Association of New York (SEAoNY).
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Five finalists unveiled for Governors Island FIGMENT pavilion

It’s never too early to start planning for the summer. As we head into winter, try to warm yourself up with thoughts of visiting Governors Island, with an iced coffee in one hand and pure, summertime optimism in the other. When you make that dream a reality in a matter of months—on the other side of a polar vortex or two—you will be greeted on the island with a new public pavilion. The City of Dreams Pavilion will be the fifth consecutive installation to come out of a competition hosted by FIGMENT, the Structural Engineers Association of New York, and the Emerging New York Architects Committee of the AIA New York Chapter. While a winning design won't be announced until next month, FIGMENT & Company have unveiled their five finalists. “Our theme for the pavilion, the City of Dreams, points toward the future," said FIGMENT in a statement. "If we imagine a future New York City where anything is possible, what would it look like?" They continued, “In our wildest and most optimistic dreams, what is the future of the city?” Take a look at the environmentally-sensitive proposals below and be sure to visit Governors Island to see the finished product in June. The Pulp Pavilion by MegaZoo Melody Rees and Arthur Azoulai According to FIGMENT: "Made from cast paper pulp, this pavilion is constructed out of recycled material and is biodegradable. The cradle to cradle design is comprised of many cone shaped modules that are tightly packed to form a domed archway. On the exterior, the design celebrates the inherent qualities of the fibrous material. On the interior, color is used to celebrate the modularity of the design and filter light to create dramatic and contrasting effect for individuals who reside within. Each cone is cast from a unique and fibrous mix consisting of recycled paper and grass seeds. Its impact is net zero and it actually contributes to the positive biomass of the earth upon demolition. This temporary structure is a showcase for the potentials of new biodegradable material technologies within the design and construction industry." Billion Oyster Pavilion by BanG studio Babak Bryan, Henry Grosmanl, and Suzie Betts with Sam Janis, Harbor School/Billion Oyster Project According to FIGMENT: "Our proposal for the Billion Oyster Pavilion joins two of Governors Island’s most exciting enterprises: Figment’s City of Dreams Pavilion and The New York Harbor School’s Billion Oyster Project. The materials that form the woven canopy (steel rebar, nylon rope, and hose clamps) are specifically used in their harbor restoration work. Additionally, the base of our Pavilion is made up of custom-cast 'Reef Balls,' a restoration device that the school will also use as part of their habitat creation effort. By donating the entire pavilion to the Harbor School, its materials will be completely re-used on the island, eliminating the need to further transport." Tied Together by Hou de Sousa Nancy Hou & Josh de Sousa According to FIGMENT: "Tied Together is a pavilion made out of aluminum pipes and strands of rope braided from 38,000 repurposed plastic bags (the amount NYC wastes every 90 seconds). The project provides a venue for events and performances, while serving as a great picnic area, and functioning as an iconic meeting point for visitors to Governors Island. From afar, Tied Together appears to be a solid sculptural object, but from up close, the overlapping composition of rope and linear gaps produces a moiré effect which visually shifts and alters the surrounding landscape as one moves between the pavilion’s spaces. Currently, less than 1% of New York City’s plastic bags are recycled, even though they account for 22% of all the plastics sent to landfills. The NY Plastic Bag Reduction, Reuse, and Recycling Act was passed in 2009 and requires medium to large scale retailers to accept plastic bags for recycling. Tied Together aims to raise awareness for this law and thereby increase its impact." Organic Growth by Izaskun Chinchilla Architects Izaskun Chinchilla Moreno, Adriana Cabello Plasencia, Alejandro Espallargas Omedas and Alfonso Aracil Sánchez According to FIGMENT: "The natural structures are adaptive and can grow up and down in response to context and time. The morphology of the hydrangea plan has been particularly useful. Mophead flowers are large dome-shaped flower heads. Through it’s growth, the plant maintains a good balance with the environment, shouldn’t the ‘city of dreams’ do the same? Architecture has to learn to adapt to changing social requirements and ecological dynamics. The philosophy of organic growth: maintaining a flexibility of ideas that is adaptive becomes crucial. This logic also generates a biophilic component, learning from nature helps to take care of human wellbeing naturally, beautifully and intuitively." Galassia by Michele Zanella According to FIGMENT: "Galassia is a free standing, geometrically rigorous yet formally expressive, self-sustaining pavilion. The nature of its shape, deriving from the minimal surface generated between two circular loops, is contemporarily expression of maximum structural efficiency and of refined formal completeness. Paced by the array of a bamboo structure and of a densely spaced set of tensed ropes, the pavilion is simultaneously identifying its structural, formal and functional content. Galassia is the depiction of flawless dynamism and internal movements within the city of the future and is the materialization of the concepts of efficiency, sustainability and aesthetic qualities combined together. A pavilion as the architectural crystallization of a collective dream: the process of a sustainable urban metamorphosis." [h/t 6sqft]
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Finalists Announced for Next Figment Pavilion on Governors Island

Take a ferry over to Governors Island in New York Harbor before September 22 and you'll stumble across a massive white cloud made up of thousands of reused milk jugs. Venture inside that cloud, and you'll be mesmerized by thousands more plastic soda bottles partially filled with blue liquid that creates an otherworldly gradient of filtered light overhead. The so-called Head in the Clouds pavilion, plopped in a grassy field on the island, is part of the annual FIGMENT festival, a celebration of arts and culture that brings a series of imaginative installations, including an unorthodox miniature golf course. In partnership with AIANY's Emerging New York Architect (ENYA) committee and the Structural Engineers Association of New York, the "City of Dreams" competition selects a pavilion designed by a young designer or practice to be built the following summer, and this year's shortlist has just been announced. Previous winners include 2010's Living Pavilion by Ann HaBurple Bup in 2011 by Bittertang, and this year's Head in the Clouds pavilion by Brooklyn-based Studio Klimoski Chang Architects. A winner will be selected by October 31, 2013. Dreamcatcher ManifoldArchitectureStudio (Brooklyn, NY) Project team: Kit von Dalwig, R.A., AIA; Philipp von Dalwig, Dipl. Ing., Assoc. AIA, LEED AP; Andreea Toca; Jane Chua From the Figment Project: "Dreamcatcher, a pavilion where imaginations are lifted, elevating your dreams, captures dreams at the idyllic meeting point of Governors Island, where people from all parts of New York can gather and encounter an experience unlike any other. We are proposing a simple, circular, lightweight structure that captures a changing collection of balloons. Why balloons? Because they’re joyful, uplifting and downright dreamy. Choose your shade, let your balloon go, and dream a little dream." Governor’s Cup CDR Studio (New York, NY) with Sustainable Engineering Services Project team: Lea H. Cloud, AIA, LEED AP BD + C; Jonathan Dreyfous, AIA, LEED AP; Victoria A. Rospond, AIA; Katya Zavyalova; Michael Baskett, AIA; Trevor Messinger; Tiffany Jin; and Yelena Rayster From the Figment Project: "The Governor’s Cup Pavilion hovers in a cluster of trees on the northern side of the Parade Ground. Recycled plastic cups, sourced and discarded throughout the city, are supported by zip-ties from overhead cables, forming a dense knitted structure unspooling from the branches. Strapping and turn-buckled cabling leave the trees unscathed. Crocheted repurposed cups infill areas between the undulated tape structure and branches, creating an airborne topography and shadow play. The configuration forms an outdoor room, shimmering in the sun and echoing with breeze-driven sound. The Greenpoint non-profit Arts@Renaissance will claim the Pavilion for their courtyard gallery space." MÖBI water tower pavilion STUDIO V Architecture (New York, NY) with FTL Design Engineering Studio and Plaxall Project team: Jay Valgora, AIA; Nic Goldsmith, FAIA; Andrew Kirby; James Andrew Scott; Karen Zabarsky; Lucas Lind; Laurie Mendez; Zhongtian Lin; Dilpreet Gil; Natasha Amladi From the Figment Project: "Inspired by the infinite surfaces and curves of a Möbius strip, MÖBI water tower pavilion expresses the potential of adaptation, life cycle, and reuse of materials in the urban landscape. New York City’s ubiquitous and iconic water towers are transformed through STUDIO V’s design into a gathering space that celebrates Governors Island. Constructed from recycled redwood and cedar planks rescued from decommissioned water tanks, MÖBI offers a pre-fabricated, ecological construction process and multi-use environment that will afterwards be repurposed yet again—as wooden deck and furniture for our design for the LIC Biergarten. Much like Governors Island, MÖBI is designed for continuous adaptation and interpretation to serve the NYC community." Urban Accordion afoam (New York, NY) Project team: Lina Bondarenko, Xiao Chen, Sunchung Min, Mario Mohan, Marvin Nardo, Michael Nartey, Wei-Yi Tseng, Tanawat Vichaiwatanapanich, Yaya Wang, Andrew Weigand, Wanjing Xiao, Ye Zhang From the Figment Project: "Our present city is overrun by private buildings, limiting access to public space. Urban Accordion is a microcosm of an alternate urban condition: a City of Dreams. Four fabric ‘blocks’ expand and contract, creating different levels of enclosure to suit a range of programming, while the space contained by the structures forms a larger communal area for events and chance encounters between the juxtaposed programs. Urban Accordionis a new urban condition: a flexible assembly for serendipity and public events that fluctuates to meet users’ demands." ArtCloud IKAR (Warsaw, Poland) Project team: Igor Bialorucki; Konrad Kedzierski; Anna Granacka; Rafal Boguszewski From the Figment Project: "The future of the city will be determined by a creative mix of technology and culture, and an even more creative reuse of materials. As cities are an amazingly rich source of materials the ArtCloud Pavilion reuses clapboards and transforms them to a free-form structure that is composed for 99% with modules. The system allows visitors to choose and personalize their own piece of ArtCloud. Modular architecture makes people more carefully consider issues of optimization and prefabrication, and saves time and energy during construction. Without a doubt ArtCloud is a direct path to wiser thinking about sustainable living."
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Figment 2013 Brings a Cloud of 50,000 Plastic Bottles to Governors Island

Each year, the AIANY's Emerging New York Architect (ENYA) committee and the Structural Engineers Association of New York bring a whimsical, wondrous, and often absurd pavilion to New York's Governors Island as part of the FIGMENT Festival. This year, FIGMENT held a design competition and 200 designers submitted proposals. The newly announced City of Dreams Competition winner for 2013 is Brooklyn-based Studio Klimoski Chang Architects and their sustainably-minded Head in the Clouds pavilion, comprised of metal rods, and thousands of plastic milk jugs and water bottles. Head in the Clouds is really a collection of 120 "pillows" joined together to create a bumpy cloud filtering light into an occupiable space below. Designers Jason Klimoski and Lesley Chang will partner with local schools and organizations to collect the 53,780 needed milk jugs and water bottles. From outside the pavilion, the array of plastic bottles will appear sparkling white, but inside with the help of a little water and blue-tinted water coloring, light shining through the pavilion will radiate in a variety of shades of blue. The pavilion will be built and displayed on Governors Island during the summer of 2013 pending necessary permitting and fundraising. At the end o the summer, the pavilion will be recycled to help offset its carbon footprint. You can donate to the pavilion-building effort at the FIGMENT website. Four other finalists were named in the competition and their proposals can be seen below: A cloud, in a tree by SAMPLES, Julien Boitard and Richard Nguyen, the Enneper Pavilion by Maria Mingallon, Fodder Form Pavilion by HuycKurlanDowling, Teddy Huyck, Alexis Kurland and Conner Dowling, and For Rent by MTWTHFSS, Ed Blumer and Pete Storey.
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Figment 2012 Livens Up Governors Island

Figment NYC is an annual celebration of arts and culture that takes place on Governors Island from June 9-10. Now in its sixth year, Figment provides New Yorkers with an interactive space to participate in the arts, with volunteer artists collaborating on works that transform the environment and the public’s perception. With visual art, music, performance, and installation works, the event will provide the community with a forum for emerging artists to engage with the public. This year installations include Face of Liberty by Zaq Landsberg, a 1:1 replica of the face of the Statue of Liberty that one can sit and climb on, and FY-Langes, a digitally fabricated structure made of foam designed by Columbia GSAPP students. As an all-volunteer organization, Figment seeks to provide an antidote to the commercialization of art—built on community rather than commerce, the event hopes to create a shared experience for the public, free of market-based constraints. To make this possible Figment relies on the contributions of community members, so please consider volunteering or making a donation.
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Scaling Sculptures on Governors Island

Kids get it. While the adults stand around discussing the merits and aspirations of a large sculpture or installation, kids climb all over it. A few years back, when Richard Serra's Intersections II was installed in MoMA's sculpture garden, toddlers raced between the tilted arcs in a game of hide and seek. More recently, kids playing around Situ Studio's reOrder installation have turned the Great Hall of the Brooklyn Museum into Romper Room. Now, with Storm King bringing in Mark di Suvero sculptures and Figment in town to install their annual golf course and sculpture garden, Governors Island is getting its workout. On Memorial Day weekend some of the artists creating the "Bugs and Features" golf course were still working out some of the kinks with their designs. While many of them addressed the issues of hot sun and island winds, they didn't quite account for the destructive nature of children. Dee Dee Maucher stood quietly pondering her installation, trying to figure out what would make it more kid proof. Two days in and her segment in the the golf course, titled The Composting Micro Bug Food Spiral, was in need repair. Michael Loverich of Bittertang mulled over how to keep the kids from climbing atop Burble Bup, this year's winner of the City of Dreams Pavilion, sponsored in part by the Emerging New York Architect committee of the AIANY and the Structural Engineers Association of New York. "We don’t want the kids, or even adults, to come in and kick it," said Loverich. "We kind of knew that people would be interacting with it, but not so aggressively." Loverich said that he and his partner Antonio Torres were considering installing some preventative climbing measures.
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Figment Island

After nearly a year of waiting, we've now seen the new designs coming to Governors Island sometime in the future. But there is also some exciting architecture, art, and, most importantly, mini golf coming to the island this summer, part of the fourth annual Figment arts program that has been populating the island with exciting activities and edifices since the park first opened. On Friday, Figment announced the winners of its call for entries for the aforementioned projects, namely an architecture pavilion, 17 sculptures, and a 10-hole mini golf course. Eschewing the flashy forms of the three finalists they beat out, Ann Ha and Behrang Behin took a creative yet affordable approach with their winning Living Pavilion, tethering together milk crates to create planters for a garden that proceed to fold in on themselves, forming a wave-like tunnel sodded with grass. Check out the architecture finalists plus a few of the winning sculptures after the jump.