Posts tagged with "Fentress Architects":

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Chicago culls its O’Hare expansion shortlist to five big-name firms

Five finalists have been selected in the competition to design the new $8.7 billion expansion of Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport, narrowing the field from the longlist of 12 released in September. The shortlist features a mix of local names and international studios: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM), Santiago Calatrava, Foster + Partners, Chicago’s own Studio Gang, and Colorado’s Fentress Architects. The expansion, part of a modernization initiative dubbed O’Hare 21 by outgoing mayor Rahm Emanuel, will totally replace the V-shaped Terminal 2, a holdover from the airport’s opening in 1944. O’Hare is one of the busiest airports in the world and currently services nearly 80 million passengers a year, and O’Hare 21 will expand the airport’s footprint from 5.5 million square feet to 8.9 million square feet. Such a large project means that these teams likely won’t be going it alone. Fentress is joined by Brook Architecture, Garza Architects, and engineering and architecture firm EXP, Calatrava will be working with local firm HKS, while Foster + Partners has teamed up with local firms Epstein and JGMA, and Studio Gang has partnered with Corgan Associates, Solomon Cordwell Buenz, and STL Architects. SOM will also be joined by Ross Barney Architects and Arup in their bid. After a review by the Department of Aviation, one team will be chosen to design the Terminal 2–replacing O’Hare Global Terminal, while a second will be tapped to design the airport’s two new satellite concourses. Perhaps what’s most interesting is who didn’t make the cut. BIG was knocked out, as were HOK and Gensler. Even Helmut Jahn, a Chicago wunderkind who designed O’Hare’s Terminal 1 in 1986, wasn’t chosen. Now that the shortlist has been chosen, an official selection committee of business, civic, and transportation leaders from Chicago will choose who ultimately gets to design the new facilities (with local architecture firms and cultural institutions providing technical support). Mayor Emanuel is pushing the city to choose before he leaves in May of 2019, and if all goes as planned, the multi-phase O’Hare 21 should be complete by 2026.
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Undulating fins create a monumental entryway at the revamped Miami Beach Convention Center

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The Miami Beach Convention Center is getting redesigned into a new 1.4-million-square-foot complex that will include an exhibition hall, four new ballrooms, and a range of meeting spaces when complete. Fentress Architects collaborated with Arquitectonica on an undulating exterior envelope inspired by the curves of waves, manta rays, and coral reefs.
 
The facade consists of more than 500 angled “fins” constructed out of aluminum plates. Each fin is braced back structure-side and stainless steel struts tie them together to combat lateral loads from hurricanes as well as to account for acoustical vibrations. Behind the rolling facade, the building is clad in a high performance unitized curtain wall with a .23 solar heat gain coefficient. A structural steel backup with an aluminum enclosure supports the cantilevered fins every 15 feet along the curtain wall. Fentress and Arquitectonica worked closely with the fabricator to guarantee the undulating facade they had designed would be constructible. Using a combination of spline-based modeling, BIM, and careful construction drawings, the team made the fabrication and installation process seamless, architect to manufacturer. The fins act as a brise soleil and shade the glazing and interior spaces behind them at both the east and west entryways. At one particular moment on the east facade, they cantilever out an impressive 38 feet to create an exterior cover at the entry. The underside of each gap between the fins is glazed with a five-foot by ten-foot sheet of glass that slopes back towards a gutter for drainage. Each piece of glass was cold bent into place on site due to the double-curved surface it needed to achieve. While the project team embraced the shade that the fins provide as an added benefit, they did not design the facade for energy efficiency. After the team ran models to analyze the building’s performance, it became clear that the design was conceived more intuitively rather than for the sake of optimization. This allowed the decisions on fin spacing and geometry to be primarily aesthetics-driven while still providing natural shading.
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Fentress Architects to design U.S. pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai

Fentress Architects will design the United States of America’s pavilion at World Expo 2020 in Dubai. The winning design is based on the theme “What Moves You,” and will emphasize, “the power and diversity of culture, technological innovation in mobility, and commercial opportunity throughout the United States,” according to a statement from Pavilion USA 2020. Fentress’s design will play into the “dynamism of American culture,” and national values of “ingenuity, progress, and innovation.” The renderings from Fentress are yet to be released. “Working across the U.S. has given Fentress Architects diverse perspective on the attributes and attitudes that Americans share. We will coalesce these characteristics into a single architectural expression at World Expo 2020 Dubai, representing the entirety of the U.S. and its design prowess to an international audience,” said Curtis Fentress, principal in charge of design at Colorado-based Fentress Architects. The Fentress-designed pavilion will work with large and small firms from across the U.S., local citizens' groups from different states, and the U.S. and U.A.E. governments to tell a story about the U.S.’s role on the global stage. The exhibit and experience design will be curated by Michigan-based George P. Johnson Experience Marketing (GPJ). Dubai Expo will be held between October 20, 2020, and April 10, 2021, near Dubai emirate’s western border with Abu Dhabi emirate. American firm HOK is responsible for its master plan. The U.A.E. selected the theme “Connecting Minds, Creating the Future” and the sub-themes Sustainability, Mobility, and Opportunity. It is expected to draw over 25 million visitors to the city and be a major economic event. The Bureau International des Expositions is the organizing body behind the shows, which are held intermittently around the world, most recently in Milan in 2015 and Shanghai in 2010. Previous expositions have been occasions for spectacular, sometimes experimental architecture, as in Buckminster Fuller's dome for Expo 1967 Montreal and Kenzo Tange's pavilion for Expo 1970 Osaka. The shows have historically been venues for industries of various nations to showcase their abilities and visions. Expo 2020 is the first world expo held in the Middle East, North Africa or South Asia. The preparation and operation of the fair are expected to result in 277,000 new jobs in the U.A.E. and inject $40 billion into the local economy. Check out this link for more details.
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Denver Art Museum plans major expansion

The Denver Art Museum (DAM) has just received a major standalone financial gift in support of revitalizing the museum’s North Building. The iconic Gio Ponti-designed North Building will celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2021 with $150 million in expanded galleries, site upgrades, and expanded resources for youth programs. The $25 million gift came from Museum Board Chairman J. Landis Martin and his wife, Sharon Martin. When upgrades are complete the North Building will bear their name in honor of their gift. “The North Building is considered one of the most significant objects in the Museum’s collection, and our family is honored to support the much-needed rehabilitation required to bring it into the 21st century,” said Lanny Martin at a ceremony announcing the gift. “The Denver Art Museum is a beacon of creativity, representing the incredible depth of the cultural community in our region and it is critical that we continue to invest in it for the benefit of the entire community.” The North building is the only Gio Ponti building in North America and was designed in collaboration with Denver-based James Sudler Associates in 1971. The improvements to the building will include bringing the public to a seventh-story observation area, part of the original design that was never realized. A new welcome center will also unify the museum campus, which also includes a wing designed by Danial Libeskind. The project was master planned by Tryba Architects in 2015. Formal designs have been led by Denver-based Fentress Architects with Boston-based Machado Silvetti Architects. The plan is to complete the upgrades and additions to the museum by 2021.
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Flight Delays: “Lack of Sophistication” Delays Public Art LAX’s New Tom Bradley Terminal

LAX finally opened its shiny new Tom Bradley terminal, designed by Fentress Architects, to quite a hullabaloo in July. The throngs who showed up for “Appreciation Days” got to enjoy shopping, music, and even free LAX keychains and knickknacks. But one of the most prominent elements was missing: the public art. Major pieces by Ball-Nogues, Pae White, and Mark Bradford were all delayed for what one participant called “a lack of sophistication on LAX’s part” in shepherding such work through. In other words, the officials didn’t get how to pull this kind of thing off. Well never fear, despite the bumps, contract disputes, and many miscues, the installations will begin opening in late September and continue through the end of the year. Better late than never.
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LAX is Really Getting There: Fentress Opens Major Terminal Expansion

Don't look now, but LAX—the airport everyone loves to hate—is starting to complete its major makeover. The biggest change is the brand new $1.9 billion (yes, billion) addition to the Tom Bradley International Terminal, designed by Fentress Architects and unveiled in 2008. Its curving roofline, emulating waves breaking on the nearby beach, pops up behind the original Tom Bradley structure, which itself was recently renovated (for the cost of $723 million) by Leo A Daly. Inside, the soaring new terminal is comprised of echoing arches and massive vaults forming a 110-foot-tall Great Hall, which beams natural light through large windows and clerestories. The terminal also includes 150,000 square feet of  new retail and dining. The entire new facility, including large new concourses, security facilities, light wells, and more retail, measures 1.2 million square feet, which doubles the space of the existing Tom Bradley terminal. This is just the tip of the iceberg. LAX's overall Capital Improvements Program budget is—wait for it—$4.1 billion, including a new Central Utility Plant, additional terminal renovations, and restoration of the Theme Building. Perhaps the most noticeable change just opened last night: AECOM's new roadway enhancements, including new LED light ribbons above roadways, sculptural, Y-shaped light poles, and fancy new metallic canopies outside of Tom Bradley. Watch for more details in the next West Coast issue of The Architect's Newspaper.
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Fentress, CO Architects Recognized at 2013 BIM Awards

The AIA Technology in Architectural Practice (TAP), in association with BIM Forum, The Construction Owners Association of America (COAA), and the International Facility Management Association (IFMA) have announced the winners of the 9th Annual Building Information Modeling (BIM) Awards which recognize the firms who best utilize BIM technology. Out of 16 submissions the jury selected two winners and three honorable mentions. CO Architects took home the "Stellar architecture using BIM" prize for their work on the Health Sciences Education Building, Phoenix Biomedical Campus (pictured above). According to a press release the project showed "an exceptional understanding of universal BIM usage, team integration, and requirements for successful implementation from programming to as built." Fentress Architects and Mortensen Construction were recognized for the Ralph L. Carr Colorado Judicial Center in Denver and  were awarded the "Delivery Process Innovation" prize. According to the press release the project exhibited "impressive statements of advanced levels of detailing in BIM, coordination, and cooperation." Honorable mentions were given to The Miller Hull Partnership for their design of the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry in Seattle, Collins Woerman and GLY Construction for the Puyallup Medical Center, Group Health Cooperative in Washington, and the University of Cincinnati their curriculum deveopment program titled "Building Relationships, University of Cincinnati College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning." The jury comprised of RK Stewart, the 2007 AIA president and current chairman of National Institute of Building Sciences board of directors; Harry McKinney, virtual design construction manager at Clancy & Theys Construction Co.; Tom Sawyer, senior editor at Engineering News-Record; Dennis Shelden, chief technology officer at Gehry Technologies; and Eric Teicholz, president and CEO at Graphic Systems.