Posts tagged with "Fashion":

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Did Rihanna's Savage x Fenty NYFW show appropriate Fascist architecture?

Last month, while the city was awash with runway walks during New York Fashion Week, perhaps no show received as much media frenzy as Savage x Fenty, Rihanna’s eponymous lingerie brand. With set design by Willo Perron in Brooklyn's Barclays Center, the show was more Super Bowl half-time show than fashion show. It featured everything from performances by Migos, DJ Khaled, 21 Savage, and celebrity-models Bella Hadid and Laverne Cox, to big choreographed dance numbers. Among the lingerie-clad, star-studded runway was an instantly recognizable architectural reference: Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana, a monumental relic of Italian Fascist architecture. Swaying models appeared in the grid of classical arched windows, almost identical to the original building’s, posing in Savage x Fenty lingerie. The iconic travertine building, a modernist take on the Colosseum, was built under Mussolini in 1943 in Rome’s EUR district for the ill-fated 1942 world fair. According to WWD, the Moroccan setting of Savage's campaign shoot was supposedly the main driver of Perron’s set design, which doesn’t explain much about the unexpected Italian references. The connection, however, isn’t necessarily an arbitrary one; Philippa Price, creative director of the Savage x Fenty show and longtime Rihanna collaborator, has cited Bob Fosse as a major inspiration in designing past Rihanna performances. Fosse was well known for using Greco-Roman imagery, such as classical statues and antiquated fluted pillars, Sweet Charity (it's also no coincidence that the musical was based on a Fellini film). This isn't the first time the Palazzo has captured the imagination of the fashion world. The building is currently occupied by the luxury fashion house Fendi, whose move there was not met without criticism. "The architecture his regime commissioned propounds a notion of ‘good taste’ that is deeply similar to that of the fashion industry," wrote Owen Hatherley in The Architectural Review, "shamelessly elitist, wilfully sinister, hierarchical, Classical, its apparent minimalism belied by an obsession with the finest possible material and the severest cut." In contrast, Rihanna has largely built Savage x Fenty on its vision of inclusivity and diversity, which has landed it much praise and branded it as the self-described antithesis of the Victoria's Secret Show.
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Iris van Herpen collaborates with architects for hypnotizing couture presentation

Since Dutch designer Iris van Herpen opened her eponymous atelier in 2007, the brand has become the face of high-tech fashion. Often the first to embrace new technologies like laser cutting and 3D printing in her fluid and futuristic forms, van Herpen has designed pieces worn by the likes of Solange and Rihanna, and, on the streets of Paris this past July 1st, Céline Dion During the presentation of van Herpen’s latest collection during Paris’s Haute Couture week, titled Hypnosis, her already alien and energetic forms came alive. The clothing literally moved on the models as they passed through a large, also motorized, ring hung in the Élysée Montmartre.  Inspired by the fluidity and complexity of natural forms, van Herpen designed 19 different looks made from traditional materials like silk and satin, as well as aluminum and stainless steel. The fabric itself was guided by engineering, with plotter machines and laser cutters working alongside hand stitching. What really stood out, though, were the actual moving parts. Dresses were mounted with metal pieces and fabric flanges that rotated around, and in the center of the runway was a large moving circle, a motorized ring called Omniverse by kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe, a "portal" designed to evoke the “universal life cycle,” according to the artist. The dresses’ moving components were devised by experimental sculptor Philip Beesley (PB), along with architect Rolf Seifert. The duo behind PB, who also led the design of the moving metal augmentations that sprout off the garments, generally works on public buildings and art, along with experimental installations—including immersive textile environments. The pair also have architectural relationships with the Living Architecture Systems Group, the School of Architecture and Faculty of Engineering at the University of Waterloo, the architectural practice of Rolf Seifert, and Riverside Architectural Press. It's hard to think of a technological setting so radical since Alexander McQueen's industrial robots to spray paint and dance along with the model in the Spring-Summer 1999 show. The results of these collaborations shook up viewers along the stage and on Instagram alike, as they pushed the bar even higher for integrating fabrication and robotics technology in haute couture, both on the garments and off. Hopefully, with Liz Diller, Kazuyo Sejima, and Cini Bouery designing for Prada and a trained-architect behind Louis Vuitton, we'll be seeing architectural thinking entering the fashion world both high and low more in the future.

Hip Hop Watches Challenge - Design the new iconic Hip Hop watch

New product design contest on Desall.com: Binda group and Desall invite you to design the new watch Hip Hop Hero 4.0, a customisable product with a minimal and distinctive design, suitable for every moment of your daily life.

Established in 1985, Hip Hop introduced the first single-piece watch with the case integrated in the strap, made of scented rubber, which became a symbol of the 80s. Now, at 10 years since its last restyling, Hip Hop invites the international community to design the new iconic watch Hip Hop Hero 4.0, able to represent the distinctive traits and the unmistakable character of the brand, through a unisex product with interchangeable strap and case.

For more info: https://bit.ly/HipHopChallenge

Contest timeline

Upload phase: 19th June 2019 – 11th September 2019 (1.59 PM UTC)

Community vote: 11th September 2019 - 23rd September 2019

Client Vote: from 11th September 2019

Winner announcement: approximately by the end of November 2019

Total awards

€5000

Participation is free of charge and open to all creative people (at least 18 years old).

BINDA

DESIGNING EMOTIONS SINCE 1906

The Binda Company was founded in 1906 by Innocente Binda, grandfather of Simone and Marcello, current CEOs of the family company. For over 100 years, Binda has been one of the major players in the watch market, still the core business of the company, complemented by jewelry and accessories.

Among the brands owned by the Company:

- Breil, watches and jewelry brand, characterised by innovative and iconic products, accompanied by a greatly memorable communication.

- Chronotech became part of the Group portfolio in 2012. A brand that has dominated the scene on the market for the last years thanks to the unique aesthetics of its products, its prismatic glass, its glamour and greatly aspirational positioning for its target.

- Hip Hop, iconic watch of the 80s that was revived in 2010 with equal success. A unique product for its design features, its range of colours and the use of innovative materials, for its interchangeability and waterproofness.

- Wyler Vetta, historical brand that since 1896 has been synonym with tradition, elegance and high quality; a brand that combines classicism and refinement with a touch of modernity and originality.

DESALL

Desall.com is an open innovation platform dedicated to design and innovation, that offers to companies a participatory design tool involving in the creative process an international community coming from all over the world. To date Desall gathers more than 100000 creatives from over 210 countries and has collaborated with international brands like Luxottica, Whirlpool, Electrolux, ALESSI, Enel, Leroy Merlin, KINDER, Barilla, illy, Chicco, Mondadori and many more.

Thanks for the contamination of different cultural backgrounds and creative industries, the Desall community is able to provide high-quality project solutions for every product development phase requested by the client, from concept to product design, from naming to packaging.

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Assemble converts New Orleans garage into experimental fashion school

The London-based architecture collective Assemble has converted a former car repair shop in New Orleans into a fashion manufacturing hub that offers free education and training for local youth. Dubbed Material Lab, the school is part of an experimental art school founded by the Tasmania-based Museum of New and Old Art (MONA), which also includes a music recording studio and a cooperative garden located nearby. In New Orleans, Assemble, a multidisciplinary studio known for its civic-minded interventions on abandoned structures and in disenfranchised areas, created a space that nods to the ruin. The first floor of the industrial garage was adapted into two large work and production spaces that are finished simply with coats of white paint and exposed concrete floors. One of the most visually striking elements of the building are the doorways and windows that appear to be punched through the walls, complete with jagged brick outlines. Some of these openings frame small plots of vegetation growing inside the building envelope, which are held behind large panes of clear glass. Bright coats of orange and mint green paint highlight structural beams and ceilings, with the orange hue reappearing in the chairs and rolling racks for clothes and textiles. Much of the furniture was designed and put together onsite by Assemble. Material Lab melds the rich culture of costuming, craft, and fashion in New Orleans with the progressive pedagogy of schools like Black Mountain College, a radically run arts college in North Carolina. The lab offers space, professional guidance, and manufacturing equipment for the production of clothing and textile design to youth ages 14 to 30, with the goal of offering a venue for both creative expression and fostering economic independence. With a focus on hands-on learning, the pilot curriculum included textile printing, embellishment, pattern cutting, draping, and clothing design, and the new building is well-equipped with industrial sewing machines, a large dye sublimation printer, a weaving loom, a heat press, other dye equipment, computers, dress forms, and the like. The first pilot session of the school culminated in a December show. Judging by images from the event, the raw and unfinished aesthetic of the space serves the energy of the emerging and experimental designers well. Assemble began working with the school in 2016 at the invitation of MONA and ran the 2018 pilot, which continued through the summer of 2019. It worked with local legends like master beader Big Chief Demond Melancon of the Young Seminole Hunters as well as international fashion stars like Virgil Abloh, the artistic director of Louis Vuitton's men's wear, along with other fashion designers and textile artists. After the pilot, the school is now gearing up to run on a permanent basis.
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Prada teams with three architects for its latest nylon collection

Just in time for Prada’s Spring/Summer 2019 womenswear rollout is the latest iteration of Prada Invites, a collaboration between the fashion house and leading designers, focused on Prada nylon. This year, Prada has teamed up with three architects to design clothing or an accessory for women using black nylon. Elizabeth Diller, Kazuyo Sejima, and Italian architect Cini Boeri were all tapped to put their unique spin on the ubiquitous material. Diller presented the Yoke Bag, a strap-and-pouch bag that can fold down to be carried with one hand or can be expanded and worn much like a life preserver. The Envelope, another example of transformable fashion, was also designed by Diller; what appears at first as a garment bag can also be worn as a raincoat. Boeri contributed a more typical bag, with a long leather strap that can be slung over the shoulder but can be expanded or made smaller based on the user’s storage needs. Sejima’s bags are more playful and modular than the others—the curved black bag with blue and pink handles, dubbed “Yooo,” can be draped over the shoulders like the Yoke Bag or carried by the handles. Additionally, blue, pink, white, and yellow pouches in irregular shapes and sizes can be attached for extra storage space and visual flair and adorn the longer “Daln” bag. The Spring/Summer 2019 iteration of Prada Invites follows the program’s launch during the Fall/Winter 2018 show in Milan, where Rem Koolhaas, Herzog & de Meuron, French designers Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, and German industrial designer Konstantin Grcic all debuted pieces.
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OMA designs sinuous Dior show at the Denver Art Museum

American lovers of both fashion and architecture can get their fix in one hit this winter. OMA has designed an exhibition now open at the Denver Art Museum chronicling the history of French fashion house Dior. From Paris to the World winds a sinuous path through a floor of the angular Daniel Libeskind–designed building, "as a nod to Christian Dior’s obsession for his Granville garden," and the meandering path that runs through it, according to a statement from OMA. The path takes visitors through a timeline of the label's work, and its history with various high profile designers, including Yves Saint Laurent, John Galliano, Raf Simons, and its current creative director, Maria Grazia Chiuri. OMA designed the exhibition to conceptually bridge Dior's clothing with Libeskind's building. The design is built around aluminum surfaces, a reference to the museum's titanium cladding, but the metal in the exhibition comes in curvilinear forms that relate to the flowing couture garments on display. The aluminum begins as a wavy backdrop for the displays that wend through Anschutz Gallery where the metal takes a variety of treatments to match the evolution of the clothing line over time. In the Martin and McCormick Gallery, the metal is used in a series of petal-shaped pedestals that create a valley-like space that displays the fashion house's global inspirations. Dior: From Paris to the World is on display now through March 3 at the Denver Art Museum.

69: Déjà Vu

Lifestyle brand 69 is the brainchild of an anonymous Los Angeles–based designer whose non-gender and non-demographic-specific clothing exuberantly suggests ideas of freedom, inclusivity, and a more fluid future. Since its founding in 2011, 69 has developed a cult following for its playful and exaggerated designs. With a strong focus on transforming denim, a typically utilitarian everyday fabric, into deeply elegant garments that resist easy categorization, 69 welcomes people of all ages, races, sexualities, and sizes into its community. For its first museum solo exhibition, 69 presents a survey of its groundbreaking clothing along with a selection of irreverent and inventive videos and photographs that blur the line between promotional material and artwork.
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Crosby Studios reveals limited-edition collection for Opening Ceremony

Harry Nuriev of Crosby Studios unveiled a whimsical, Dr. Seuss-eque collection of neon purple furniture for NYCxDESIGN. The maximal collaboration with the New York-based clothier, Opening Ceremony, includes interior wares and fashion items including lamps, garment racks, side tables, and accent chairs— as well as a set of brush-stroked vases and tote bags. AN spoke to the Moscow-born designer about his vibrant use of color, anatomical references (specifically the hand), his design process, and future aspirations. Architect’s Newspaper: What is the inspiration/idea behind the collection? How does that translate cohesively through apparel, ceramics, and, and the home good? Harry Nuriev: I was inspired by the idea of making furniture a part of your everyday wardrobe. Furniture can be equally as expressive as one's outfit, and I hope I achieved that with this collection. I wanted to make the collection cohesive through the use of figurative abstraction, abstract expressionist brushstrokes, and playful materials, forms, and colors. Another inspiration behind the collection: I've always been obsessed with Pedro Friedberg's hand chair. I think it's ingenious to support the body by a giant hand—it gives you a sense of security, as if some giant being is protecting you. The play in scale is also ridiculous, which is what inherently drew me to the chair. AN: How did the collaboration begin? What was the goal? HN: This is the first time I’ve worked with OC, but I’ve been a fan of the brand since its inception. It feels like a very organic collaboration that comes out of a place of mutual interest and respect. Once we met, everything was very seamless—so much so that our micro-home collection grew to encompass not only chairs, but bookshelves, ceramics, rugs, and even T-shirts, tote bags, and keychains. AN: What brands are you vying to work with in the future? HN: Rimova, Vipp, NARS, and Opening Ceremony one more time, but in their LA flagship. I'd also love to work on a Celine store, adding new ingredients while preserving the heritage of the brand and making Hedi Slimane happy at same time. AN: How do you plan your year? What is our product development process? HN: I’m about to make a new line of furniture—it's going to be really special and new for me. I'm hoping to complete a lot of projects over the summer, but my schedule is always in flux—I feel like I'm constantly traveling the world, and starting new collaborations each month! I'm also opening a pop-up gallery in New York in September, and hope to bring it to LA as well. Visiting Japan is definitely on the horizon. AN: What product do you wish you designed? HN: I'd love to work with more fashion brands, design movie sets, and even work with cosmetic brands... I really like the idea making the perfect nail polish and crazy lipstick with my own elusive palette. AN:  What are you working on now/next? HN: I'm working on a new collection of furniture and some nice commercial spaces in US and in Europe. I also have a collaboration with Liam Gillick for Sight Unseen OFFSITE's Field Studies series, on view May 17th! The limited edition pieces are sold at the Opening Ceremony Howard Street flagship store and available in  2-10 items per unit, ranging from $35-$230.
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Craft collaborations elevate Thakoon’s flagship Soho store by SHoP Architects

Like an architect, fashion designer Thakoon Panichgul carefully balances contemporary and historical influences. His eponymous brand has won him fans from Michelle Obama to Target, but when it came time to build a brick-and-mortar store, Panichgul and New York–based SHoP faced a more complex balancing act. They wanted to carefully devise an interior that would reflect its Soho surroundings and the Thakoon aesthetic, all while grabbing the attention of passersby and setting itself apart from competitors.

“Thakoon was really interested in making [the store] of its place, of New York, bringing in the grit of the city,” said Coren Sharples, principal at SHoP. Concrete with dark aggregate covers the floors, and the architects tapped Brooklyn-based Fernando Mastrangelo Studio to cast multiple concrete walls throughout the store. Mastrangelo reproduced the subtle gradients of his furniture on an architectural scale, pouring multiple layers of gray-hued concrete in a single casting. “This was crazy, it was done on site,” said Sharples. “This was formed up and poured. Really a little scary, but [Mastrangelo] was amazing.”

Wood was also an important part of Panichgul’s vision—the designer had prepared a mood board with several wood treatments that figured prominently in other fashion brands’ aesthetics. These ranged from light treatments with vernacular ornamentation (what he called “American Traditional”) to richly grained and darkly stained (“American Glam”). SHoP and Panichgul ultimately chose an unfinished white oak (“American Cool”), a look that left the wood in its raw, natural state. White oak surfaces sinuously undulate along the showroom’s walls even as they retain a dry, coarse texture. The architects and client also worked closely with Brooklyn-based furniture maker Vonnegut/Kraft on the store’s wood furniture: Connection details, leather seating, and each edge and taper went through multiple iterations before landing on a design that features simple woven-leather straps. Vonnegut/Kraft’s pieces stand in the main showroom and hug the curves of each dressing room.

Extra seating is provided by travertine blocks that were CNC-milled in Italy to 3-D models provided by SHoP. Panichgul tapped London-based designer Michael Anastassiades for the principal lighting features: simple orbs with brass detailing. Brass is also used for the store’s clothing rods and the towering sculptural display rack that stands prominently in the main showroom.

Taken all together, the materials find ways to somehow be both angular and curved, smooth and gritty, even as their neutral tones give the clothing center stage. “We wanted it to be infused with material sensibility and warmth, but at the same time, it’s always this line you walk because you don’t want to overpower or dictate,” said Sharples.

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Explore landscape architecture and fashion design together at this new GSD exhibit

The exhibition Designing Planes and Seams is now open at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD). The exhibit is co-curated by Harold Koda, fashion scholar and former curator-in-chief of the Anna Wintour Costume Center at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Ken Smith, acclaimed landscape architect. Designing Planes and Seams aims to explore the parallels between two seemingly disparate design fields—landscape and fashion—to prove that they may not be as unrelated as they first appear. “In the design arts, invention, innovation, and the discovery of new insights and methods of working often happen through cross-disciplinary investigation,” said Anita Berrizbeitia, professor of landscape architecture and chair of the GSD’s Department of Landscape Architecture, in a press release. In this cross-disciplinary exhibition, the curators propose that the two fields share a similar objective: creating structure for an organic body, revealing the designer’s intellectual process, and allowing for cultural expression. “In both clothing and landscape design, for example, seams join different material conditions, gradients, or directions of flow. When considered comparatively, interpretive frameworks emerge that broaden our imagination and yield new possibilities in the conceptualization of landscapes,” Berrizbeitia added. The exhibition includes six dress forms curated by Koda and two from the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s collection, all paired with corresponding landscape architecture projects. The exhibit reveals each piece’s design process and the parallels shared by both disciplines, such as conceptual and tectonic responses to physical constraints. Select student projects from Smith’s Fall 2016 GSD studio “Inherent Vice,” which explored similar conditions of seams, junctures, materials, and form, specifically relating to landscape and urbanization, are also on view alongside the dress forms. The exhibition Designing Planes and Seams is on display until March 26. A reception featuring the curators, Koda, Smith, and Berrizbeitia, will be held on Friday, February 24, at 12:00 p.m. More information can be found at here.
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AMO designs Prada's 2017 Spring/Summer set space

OMA's internationally-based research, branding, and publication studio AMO has designed the set of Italian fashion brand Prada's Spring Summer 2017 show.

Formed in 1999, 24 years after Rem Koolhaas founded the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), AMO is the architecture practice's research think-tank. Directed by Reinier de Graaf, a partner at OMA, AMO addresses issues surrounding architectural production and other mediums such as fashion, print, online media. Past projects include a redesign of the EU flag and being a leader in the production of Volume magazine.

In 2011, the group worked with Prada on the confusingly titled OMA*AMO for/with Prada, an exhibition in Venice. This year, OMA's Shohei Shigematsu designed the exhibition space for Manus x Machina at the Met.

This year's project for Prada, however, is on a much larger scale. The design features a catwalk runway divided into three zigzagging segments that slope down to the audience seating. The upper-most level, the entry gangway, is located behind a mesh-crafted colonnade.

Made from metal, the mesh dominates the interior space and allows an array of colored lighting to permeate through and illuminate the space. "Generating an abstract layer, composed of meshes with different patterns and dimensions...overlap to recreate a total space. The transparency of the cladding material unveils the underlying framework with Cartesian precision," the firm said in a press release.

Subsequently the resultant glow from the lights aims to de-humanize the space, "[dematerializing] all the surfaces, coloring the room, now reminiscent of a post-human scenario."

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Shohei Shigematsu discusses OMA’s "Manus x Machina" exhibition

Technology within the realm of the fashion industry is seldom appreciated from an artistic perspective. Instead, it is synonymous with churning out standardized sheets of fabric, lacking the charm and value inherent in handmade garments.

Andrew Bolton, curator of The Costume Institute, is hoping to change that with Manus x Machina, a daring new fashion exhibition at the Robert Lehman Wing at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Director of the Office for Metropolitan Architecture New York, Shohei Shigematsu, led the exhibition design working alongside the Met’s design department.

Featuring more than 170 ensembles, spanning the 1900s to the present, Manus x Machina seeks to identify the role technology has played in the fashion industry since the emergence of haute couture in the 20th century. Shigematsu said he was wary of representing the difference between man and machine literally. Instead, his team sought to create a “neutral, themeless” environment that could be used as a platform for discussion about the exhibits themselves. “It’s all about people paying attention to detail,” explained Shigematsu. 

Shigematsu’s design also offers a sense of ephemerality, juxtaposing the permanence of the Met’s stonework with scaffolding and a translucent screen—a “theatrical material that has different properties of translucency and transparency depending on the light,” said Shigematsu. “You can see the structure through the scrim,” he continued. “You have the classical language of the arches and domes, but it has a very contemporary material and a sense of temporality that doesn’t exist within the Met. It’s a fresh internal space.”

When walking into the exhibition, visitors enter into what appears to be an all-white church. Despite avoiding any theme when developing the exhibition design with Bolton, Shigematsu said, religious themes arose. One of the main exhibits, chosen by Bolton, is an ornate Karl Lagerfeld–designed Chanel scuba knit wedding dress. “We [Bolton and Shigematsu] noticed that the pattern on the dress was really beautiful, so we thought to project this pattern onto the dome, almost creating the feel of the Sistine Chapel. We really inspired each other to make it look like a church.”

“We had to block out a lot of natural light because there are a lot of sensitive garments. So we basically decided to create an inner shell—then that started to look religious because of the existing structure’s spatial configuration,” he added. Interestingly, the entrance to this “religious” wing only has one entry point—a medieval exhibition currently on display that “already looks like a religious room,” said Shigematsu. “We thought that we could extend that world, but in a completely different material, creating a sense of classical continuity… I thought that this tension between the classical and the contemporary was quite interesting,” he continued.

He also opined that the exhibition was a good opportunity for OMA to alter its image. “Our firm tends to be known as focusing too much on the intellectual side,” he continued. “I really would like to change that culture… I think that this exhibition was a great realization for us to do something very pure and also maybe ‘romantic.’”