Posts tagged with "Facade":

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Product> Finds from the Floor at AIA 2013 Expo

Between keynote sessions, awards presentations, and interviews at the American Institute of Architects' (AIA) National 2013 Convention, AN's editors joined 20,000 attending architects in the search for the newest and most innovative products on the floor of the Colorado Convention Center's exposition hall. Following are a few notable discoveries. SureClad Porcelain Stone Crossville The Tennessee-based supplier of interior ceramics has partnered with Shackerley, a British manufacturer of porcelain ventilated facade systems, for an exterior cladding solution that meets U.S. building codes, including all seismic and hurricane standards. The system (pictured above) is supported by an aluminum frame and is delivered to job sites as a prefabricated system to ensure fast and efficient installation. SunGuard Neutral 78/65 Guardian Industries Developed to passively retain heat in colder climates, Neutral 78/65's low-E coating facilitates high visible light and a neutral color. It can be used in double- or triple-glazed units and can also be combined with any of SunGuard's other low-E coatings. AA5450 Series OptiQ Window Kawneer The new series in the OptiQ line of windows maintains thermal continuity and reduces energy transmission in both single and double hung constructions thanks to a polyamide thermal break. The 4-and-5/8-inch aluminum frame maintains a minimal profile and can be outfitted with 1-inch double pane or 1-and-1/2-inch triple pane insulated glass. OptiQ Windows are also available with expanded configurations. Benchmark Facade Systems Kingspan A fully integrated line of ventilated exterior cladding debuted at AIA 2013 and is now available from Kingspan. The company supplies a complete system of metal rails, insulated panels with a Bayer-developed polyurethane, and fastening solutions. The cladding is available in aluminum composite material (ACM), metal composite material (MCM), plate, high pressure laminate (HPL), ceramic granite, terra cotta, and thin brick, and comes in a broad range of colors. YUW 750 XTH Unitized Wall System YKK Hurricane and impact mitigating glazing for low- to mid-rise commercial buildings can be applied to multi-span curtain and single-span ribbon walls with YKK's latest addition to its ProTek portfolio. The new wall system can be specified with visible exterior face covers, a four-sided structural silicone glaze, or in a combination of both. It also boasts U-factors as low as .30.
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San Francisco Facades+ Performance: Day 1 Speaker Highlights

San Francisco Facades+ PERFORMANCE is only three weeks away! Connect with other architects, fabricators, developers, consultants, and other design professionals and earn up to 8 AIA LU credits per day at the conference, presented by AN and Enclos, July 11 to 12, 2013. Invaluable information, networking opportunities, and hands-on workshops are on the lineup for this year’s two-day event. The symposium on Day 1 involves exciting presentations and discussion-based panels. Here are just a few of the speaker highlights on the agenda for Facades+. Claire Maxfield, Director of Atelier Ten, in conjunction with Jeffrey Vaglio of Enclos, will offer introductory remarks on Day 1. Her expertise includes facade optimization and water systems. Ecoarchitect Ken Yeang of Hamzah & Yeang is an architect, planner and ecologist known for his distinctive green aesthetic. He trained at the AA School and received a PhD from Cambridge, and he will present a keynote address at the symposium titled "Ecoarchitecture: Living Facades and Architecture." Edward Peck of Thornton Tomasetti will speak about The Components of Performance on Day 1. Peck has over 15 years of experience in architecture, building skin technologies and building systems fabrication. Gary Handel, Founding Partner of Handel Architects, has directed the expansion of his firm to over 150 architects, designers, and planners since its start in 1994. Handel focuses on enriching the urban environment and will present a keynote address on Day 1 titled "Glass Without Guilt." Stephen Selkowitz, Senior Advisor of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has over 35 years of experience in building energy performance and sustainable design. With a focus on RD&D of energy efficient glazing and facade technologies, he will give a lecture titled "Measured Building Energy Performace: First Results from the New York Times HQ Building." Don't miss out on conversing with some of the world's top design professionals. Early Bird registration has been extended—register online today!
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French Architect’s Restaurant Designs Creates A Pixelated Green Facade

Whoever said that one needs to leave the city to experience nature hasn’t seen French architect Stephane Malka’s striking facade proposal for the Parisian restaurant EP7, an unusual site that is sure to stand out in the urban setting of the city. Amidst a city of man-made concrete and glass structures could rise a building essentially comprised of an organically growing “forest. Malka, who has experience in urban landscaping, created a green facade that wraps around a glass enclosure and is composed of raw wooden blocks arranged in a patchy, pixelating pattern. The uneven surface creates spaces for plant life to grow, spilling flourishing green plants and foliage down the building. The textured wooden facade, which seems to actively move inward to completely engulf the glass skin, stops to reveal an expansive view of the restaurant’s interior. Malka’s work presents passersby and restaurant customer with with the interesting paradox of nature abundantly flourishing in an urban environment. [Via Design Taxi.]
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Registration Open> facades+ PERFORMANCE Coming to San Francisco this July

Banner_Image-Tempate_630x160_v2 Whatever your plans may be for this summer, be sure to check out this year’s second facades+ PERFORMANCE conference, symposium, and workshops in San Francisco on July 11th-12th, hosted by The Architect’s Newspaper in collaboration with Enclos. Registration is now open! Facades+ is an ongoing series of conferences that has traveled to cities across the nation, including New York, Chicago, and San Francisco. Each year the event focuses on a new theme, this year we have selected Performance. After receiving positive responses from our New York City conference attendees this past April we are thrilled to bring the event to San Francisco. For this two-day event we have recruited a few of the industry’s frontrunners in building skin technology to speak and lead workshops on the delivery, development, and maintenance of high-performance building skins that effectively respond to the rapidly changing environmental conditions we face today. Featuring a Keynote Address by Ecoarchitect Ken Yeang of Hamzah & Yeang, Day 1 (Symposium Day) of the event will include a series of discussion-based panels and presentations presented by leading design professionals. Day 2 (Workshops Day) of the event will be dedicated to half-day Dialog Workshops that will take place in intimate seminar-style classrooms, and full-day Technology Workshops in which participants will work on hands-on assignments. Join the dialog, register now!
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Herald Center—From Discount Drab to LED Luminous

Located at one of the busiest intersections in Manhattan—and probably the world—the outdated Herald Center has recently been slated for a $50 million facelift by Moed de Armas & Shannon architecture firm. Hailing from the 1980s, the tinted black windows on the first three floors will be replaced with sheer insulated glass, while the façade of the remaining floors is transformed to offer passersby an LED-lit view befitting the luminous Times Square a few blocks north. The Herald Center opened in 1982, before technology allowed the combination of energy efficiency and crystalline sleekness sought after by Moed de Armas & Shannon. The 10-story building will finally now be brought up to code and given a look worthy of the times. New tenants are currently being wooed to the 250,00o square foot space, which currently harbors retail chains like Modell’s, Payless Shoes, and the New York State DMV. Renovations are slated for completion by May 2014.
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Pelli Clarke Pelli’s Transbay Center Glass Facade Could Become Perforated Metal

[beforeafter] transbay_facade_01a transbay_facade_01b [/beforeafter]   The perforated aluminum skin would replace the previously proposed glass facade. (Courtesy TJPA) It looks like Pelli Clarke Pelli's Transbay Transit Center, which stretches about three blocks through the city's Rincon Hill neighborhood, might go ahead with its first major piece of value engineering. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the architects have suggested that the building's undulating glass skin become perforated aluminum. The move would meet federal safety guidelines and chop $17 million from the estimated $1.59 billion budget for the center's first phase. The Transbay Joint Powers Authority (TJPA) board will be  asked to approve the change at its March 25 meeting. The structure is not expected to be complete before 2017. [beforeafter] transbay_facade_03a transbay_facade_03b [/beforeafter]   "This is a dramatic change in material, but the philosophical change is not enormous," said Fred Clarke of the firm Pelli Clarke Pelli, who said the terminal would still feel light, not heavy. Chronicle critic John King warned that the move "could make the transit center less of a sinuous, snaking form—and more of a drab block—as it spans First and Fremont streets." On Pelli's side, Clarke argued that the wrapping would still be transparent. Of course he admitted: "Architects who do this kind of building must be very, very pragmatic."
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Product> Well Clad: Glass & Metal Facade Systems for All Seasons

You've got to have one. A facade, that is. So AN rounded up five leading glass and metal facade systems  whose value is more than skin deep. For instance, Kalzip's FC Rainscreen, used on New Orleans' Superdome. These aluminum panels form a non-penetrative facade system that can be installed in two directions, from top to bottom or from the bottom up. Individual sheets can be removed and installed independently of the rest of the assembly. The system's quick, cost-effective installation procedure won it the job of renovating the Superdome in Louisiana in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. STILLA JOEL BERMAN GLASS STUDIO These three-dimensional kiln-cast glass panels are available in a low-iron version, which virtually eliminates the green cast inherent in clear float glass. They can also be tempered for safety and impact resistance for exterior applications. The panels can be installed with the studio's newly expanded line of hardware, which has been designed specifically for this glass product. OMBRA PULP STUDIO A wire mesh core surrounded by tempered glass obscures angled light, yet appears transparent when viewed head-on, allowing more daylight to enter a building in the morning and late afternoon when the sun is low on the horizon. It can filter up to 50 percent of transmitted light without tinting or special coating, and also acts as a moisture-resistant sound barrier with an STC rating of up to 49. REYNBOND ACM ALCOA REYNOBOND This lightweight Aluminum Composite Material (ACM) is as durable as it is pliable. It comes in interlocking panels that can be folded or curved while still retaining its shape, making it an ideal choice for challenging facades. Designers can choose among a variety of colors and also have the option of selecting a fire-retardant mineral core. YES 45 TU YKK This expansion to YKK's popular storefront system allows it to handle front-set glass applications, improving thermal performance and allowing for either interior or exterior glazing. The patented Thermabond Plus process creates a thermally broken system that reduces heat flow through the frame, saving energy and providing architects and designers with greater flexibility.
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Fabricating New Solar Skins

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Research into flexible active skins opens up new BIPV possibilities

As building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) technology becomes more advanced, architects are getting involved in how new systems affect not only a building’s performance, but also its appearance. “The photovoltaic industry was until now largely developed by engineers,” said Daniel Martín Ferrero, a Madrid-based architect researching solar design. “The architect must enter the industry to develop their integration into the urban scene.” Ferrero has launched a new company named The New Solar Architecture with a goal of bringing a higher level of design to solar energy-producing facades.
  • Fabricator and Designer Daniel Martín Ferrero
  • Location Madrid, Spain
  • Status Conceptual design
  • Materials Thin-film photovoltaic-laminated glass
  • Process BIPV module design and fabrication
“I try to convey the idea that the generation of clean energy can be part of the beauty of its major consumer, the city,” said Ferrero. The company’s goal is to design an active skin whose solar modules are composed of flexible material, which would facilitate a broader range of BIPV design possibilities for architects. Now in the conceptual design and construction phase, his Free Form Solar Powered hexagonal modules are manufactured with photovoltaic laminated glass. Along with the modules, Ferrero has developed details for potential construction systems that would integrate them, including ventilated facades, curtain walls, and monolayer structures. The hexagonal, honeycomb-like skins could have far-reaching implications for BIPV design in projects as small as parking structures or as large as Olympic stadiums. Watch the video below to see the fabrication process behind BIPV glass:
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Taylor Family Digital Library Sunscreen

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LEED Gold-certified building protects old documents with a modern mesh design

The new Taylor Family Digital Library houses some of the University of Calgary’s prized documents—more than 800,000 architectural drawings, one million maps and aerial photographs, and thousands of print monographs are among the nine million items in the collection. The university built the library as part of its mission to become one of Canada’s top five research libraries by 2016, the year of its 50th anniversary. But the library also serves the practical goal of protecting the special documents and art collections that were relocated there from other facilities. To that end, architect Kasian Architecture Interior Design and Planning envisioned the 265,000-square-foot building enshrouded in a veil of mesh that would provide solar protection while creating a semi-transparent facade and day-lit interiors to be enjoyed by students and community members.
  • Fabricator Cambridge Architectural
  • Architect Kasian Architecture
  • Location Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Status Complete
  • Materials Stainless steel mesh and attachment system
  • Process Solar analysis, self-tensioning shading system design, engineering, and fabrication
“Kasian selected the stainless steel mesh used as a screening device on the exterior of the building for three primary reasons,” said Bill Chomik, the project’s principal design architect. “First, the mesh reduced the amount of solar gain into the Information Commons—a glass box intended to be the centerpiece of the library. Second, the mesh diminished glare, and third, the screen leant an interesting and beautiful dimension to the architectural and aesthetic quality of the building.” Kasian worked with architectural mesh design, engineering, and fabrication company Cambridge Architectural to realize the screening system, which partially wraps the building atop a low-profile frame. The project team included general contractor CANA Construction and facade installer Flynn Canada, who consulted on the specification of the facade mesh. The screening system uses 5,630 square feet of a flexible-weave stainless steel mesh that Cambridge calls Mid-Balance for its 52 percent open area. Self-tensioning attachment hardware creates a tailored appearance, concealing the mesh ends within custom-cut apertures in tubing that is then integrated into a steel bracket and structural support system. The tubing creates a slender visual reveal between panels, adding another visual element to the facade's floating geometry. Designed in conjunction with the library building, the Taylor Quadrangle will add new landscaped community space to the Calgary campus; the university’s new High Density Library, located off the main campus, will house 60 percent of the school’s books and journals, along with archives. With a total budget of more than $200 million, the three projects were funded by philanthropists Don and Ruth Taylor and the Canadian government.
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KPMB’s Ductal facade in Toronto

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Rotman School makes the most of high-performance concrete and glass

The University of Toronto Rotman School of Management’s nearly $100 million expansion project will more than double the size of the business school. A new 161,000-square-foot building designed by Toronto-based KPMB Architects mediates between its neighbors—a historic 19th century brick home on one side and the towering Brutalist Robarts Library on the other—while maintaining views to the medieval Oxbridge-style Massey College to the east. The architect’s solution to the architectural mixture is an elevated box made with floor-to-ceiling glazing punctuated by slivers of Ductal, a patented ultra-high performance concrete made by Lafarge.
  • Fabricator Armtec
  • Designer KPMB Architects
  • Location Toronto, Canada
  • Status In progress
  • Materials Ductal
  • Process Precast panel design and fabrication
The building’s curtain wall is partly clad with more than 350 dark gray Ductal panels that are just 30 millimeters thick. Panels range from .5 to 1 meters wide by 3.5 to 5.3 meters high. An additional 100 panels, each only 19 millimeters thick, create an interior feature wall. The color and texture of the curtain wall’s opaque sections complement the black slate rooftops of several houses nearby. Fabricated by Ontario-based precast manufacturer Armtec, the panels were made with Ductal because of the concrete’s aesthetic quality and its ability to meet the structural requirements of a curtain wall application. KPMB’s challenge was to meet the university's request for a long, thin, lightweight span facade panel more than 5 meters tall, with a durable exterior surface. They hoped for a material that would show no signs of wear from the elements over time. Ductal could create a very thin, monolithic-plate, slab-type design with a custom-colored and molded surface that would also “plug-and-play” with curtain wall framing systems without intermediate jointing. The panels went through several iterations during the project’s mockup phase. Because Ductal was a fairly new material to Armtec, they studied its structural capabilities before developing the final panel manufacturing process and appearance. The final panel pattern and size is based on the need to keep the glass panels down to ±40 percent of the overall skin (due to energy performance criteria for LEED). The design also accommodates one operable window per office. The weight of the larger Ductal panels, along with the oversized unitized curtain wall panels, created some installation challenges during construction. Because the panels had a smooth exterior surface, the contractor was able to use vacuum cup lifters typically used with glass to install the panels. The technique allowed the smooth-panel fabrication processes to be maintained while keeping the project on schedule and reducing installation costs. Recently completed, the facade has added an appealing new face to the campus ahead of the building’s completion. When the addition opens later this year, the new structure will be fully integrated with the existing business school, allowing students to move through both buildings via several horizontal connections and a full-height atrium and staircase.