Posts tagged with "Exhibitions":

Placeholder Alt Text

On View at the Whitney: Scrim veil-Black rectangle-Natural light

This summer, the Whitney Museum of American Art will reinstall a work for the first time since its original conception in 1977. Robert Irwin (b. 1928) formed the large-scale Scrim veil-Black rectangle-Natural light, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, especially for the Emily Fisher Landau Gallery almost four decades ago. The exhibition was central to Irwin’s career, as it determined the path for his ensuing practice, and will now be on display for the second time from June 27 to September 1, 2013. The work accentuates the Whitney’s renowned Breuer building and the natural light that reaches the interior from the single Madison Avenue window. Irwin’s installation involves a partially transparent white scrim weighted down by a black metal bar. The system is suspended from the ceiling and hangs five and a half feet above the floor, spanning 117 feet across the room. A thin black line mirrors the bar and borders the gallery walls. The elements accentuate the setting and sway visitors’ observations of the Museum’s fourth floor. In concurrence with the exhibition, the Whitney will digitize the 1977 exhibition catalogue and make it accessible online. It will contain images, plans, and information assembled by the 1977 exhibition’s curator, Richard Marshall. The updated report will include a new introduction by Whitney Chief Curator Donna De Salvo. Photographs and drawings associated with the display will be located in another fourth-floor gallery. Robert Irwin is a native of Long Beach, California and studied at the Otis Art Institute and the Chouinard Art Institute, where he trained in Abstract Expressionist painting. He was invited to join the Ferus Gallery in 1958, but soon after he began to create new minimalist works. As he fused his creative methods with his interests in science, philosophy, and religion, Irwin conceived that art must be conditional to its environment and must enhance viewers’ perceptions. He deserted the idea of the frame to create art in express response to certain settings. An artist at the forefront of the Light and Space movement, he continues to build site-specific works.
Placeholder Alt Text

Hermitage Museum's Calatrava Show the World's Most Popular Design Exhibition

The Art Newspaper is out with its latest listing of top exhibitions and museum attendance for 2012 and in the category "Architecture and Design" there are some surprises. MoMA, the first museum in the world to have an architecture department, has led this category for many years and in 2011 as usual had the top three architecture and design exhibitions in the survey. But for 2012 St. Petersburg's Hermitage Museum's first show dedicated to a living architect, Santiago Calatrava: The Quest For Movement, broke MoMA's monopoly of the category and became the most popular exhibit in the world. The exhibit on the Spanish architect drew 430,000 visitors or 5,217 people per day during its run in St. Petersburg—making it the 23rd most popular show overall in the survey. The next two top-drawing shows were again at MoMA with their design show Century of the Child: Growing by Design and Foreclosed: Rehousing The Dream leading the way with nearly a million visitors for the two exhibits on 53rd Street. The Cooper Hewitt made the list this year with two exhibitions: Graphic Design: Now in Production and Design With the Other 90% coming in at number six and seven in attendance. Sadly as a result of its recent financial difficulties Rome's MAXXI Museum was nowhere to be seen in this years list though in 2011 it had two exhibitions in the top ten.
Placeholder Alt Text

Doug Aitken celebrates the destruction of New York's Gallery 303

What do you do if a building is slated for demolition? If you’re the artist Doug Aitken and the building is your gallery, you devise a “time-based destruction installation.” Which is precisely what Aitken, who is known for wrapping the facade of the Hirschhorn Museum in with a 360-degree video installation to the tune of “I Only Have Eyes For You,” installing a video "land art" installation on the Seattle Art Museum, and the video “Sleepwalkers” projected on the facades of MoMA, “a cinematic art experience that directly integrates with the architectural fabric of the city while simultaneously enhancing and challenging viewers’ perceptions of public space” did. Aitken’s latest exhibition, which wrapped up at the end of March, entitled 100 YRS at Gallery 303 on West 21st Street was filled with word-based artworks such Plexiglas letters spelling “Art” with chocolate milk-like slurry cascading over the letters, black textured rock spelling “Sunset” and “Magic” featuring rear-lit images of the blowing up of Pruitt-Igo on each letter. Visitors were greeted by “Sonic Fountain” which is a round hole jackhammered out of the galley floor (since it was going to be destroyed anyway), filled with water from dripping pipes on the ceiling, and equipped with underwater microphones to amplify the dribbling sounds. The gallery walls and floors were gradually being destroyed around these artworks over the last week, not by construction workers, but by musicians. Three percussionists gently deconstructed the space climbing onto drywall, hacking away at rubble, and rising on scissor-lifts, making a music of sorts as they worked. The one-story building has been sold, and word from the gallery director Cristian Alexa is that Norman Foster has been retained to build a tower on the site.
Placeholder Alt Text

Tonight> MAK Center's Dialogues Series Concludes With Impressive Exhibition

Dialogues, the series of conversations between architects and artists that took place at the MAK Center in Los Angeles over the last couple of months, is finishing up tonight with an exhibit of the designers' work. The show features drawings, images, and models from a serious lineup at For Your Art on Wilshire Boulevard. Contributors include: Doug Aitken, Barbara Bestor, Escher Gunewardena, Fritz Haeg, Jorge Pardo, Linda Taalman, Xavier Veilhan, Pae White, Peter Zellner, and many many more. The show will be up until April 16.  
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Cooper Union Exhibition Explores Environmental Design in Modernism

Lessons From Modernism is the smartest and most compelling exhibition ever mounted in New York (and maybe anywhere) on the influence of nature and the environment in architectural design. This Cooper Union exhibition looks at and analyzes 25 iconic modern buildings from architects like Le Corbusier, Paul Rudolph, Jean Prouvé, and Oscar Niemeyer. Conceived and curated by Cooper Union Professor Kevin Bone, Lessons From Modernism brilliantly demonstrates how these and other important modern architects integrated environmental concerns into their designs and "explores the extent to which these practices have produced environmentally performative and distinctive architecture." Staged in a school known for its formal architectural inventions it makes the case that environmental design has long been a a foregrounded consideration in the creation of architecture and not something created by by the United States Building Council and its LEED certification process. Professor Bone has created a valuable time line of major landmarks in the environmental design movement and directed his students to produce precise and beautiful models of these 25 buildings. The exhibition includes analytical drawings illustrating the sustainable design issues within each project in the show and includes texts by Professor Bone, Kenneth Frampton, Lydia Kallipoliti, and Carl Stein. The show runs through March 23 so run to see it before it vanishes.  
Placeholder Alt Text

Making Room: New York Micro-Apartments on Display Beginning January 23

Think you could live in just 325 square feet? While Manhattan is already famous for its cramped quarters, micro-apartments are poised to take space efficiency to the next level with Murphy beds lurking behind sofas and roll-away walls concealing closets. You'll have a chance to test drive one of the tiny abodes at a new exhibition, Making Room: New Models for Housing New Yorkers, organized by the Museum of the City of New York and the Citizens Housing & Planning Council. Opening on January 23, the exhibition will include a full-scale, furnished mock-up of a micro-apartment, highlighting the changing ways city-dwellers live, especially as more and more choose to live alone. The sample unit will feature highly adaptable furniture by companies such as Resource Furniture that makes a micro-apartment lifestyle possible. Making Room will also unveil the top designs for Mayor Michael Bloomberg's adAPT micro-apartment design competition, showcasing proposals from various architects and developers for what will eventually be New York's first entirely micro-apartment building on East 27th Street. Organizers are also hosting an exclusive opening party the day before the exhibition opening, Tuesday, January 22, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm at the Museum of the City of New York, where you might see Honorary Exhibition Chair and New York City Planning Chair Amanda Burden, who has been vocally delighted with the concept.  Making Room runs through September 2013.
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Edgeless School at the Center for Architecture

Edgeless School: Design for Learning Center for Architecture 536 LaGuardia Place Through January 19, 2013 Edgeless School investigates how technology is changing education and how architecture itself is changing as a result. The exhibition takes a look at 19 newly completed schools throughout the country (eight are in New York City and the majority of the rest are in the Pacific Northwest) and sorts them by their degree of “edgelessness.” The Ethical Culture Fieldston Middle School in the Bronx, for example, softens the distinction between the built environment and nature by embracing outdoor space and using a connection with nature as an educational tool. The L.B. Landry High School in New Orleans, LA, on the other hand, blurs conventional distinctions between constituencies by encouraging students, educators, parents, and architects to work together to create a building that is designed to further the school’s pedagogical goals.
Placeholder Alt Text

SFMOMA Planning Posthumous Lebbeus Woods Exhibition

Just weeks after architect Lebbeus Woods' death at age 72, SFMOMA is getting the word out about a new exhibition of his work that will run from February 16th through June 2nd, 2013. The show, entitled Lebbeus Woods, Architect, will feature 75 pieces from the eccentric designer's portfolio—most of them mutating forms in pencil— including Nine Reconstructed Boxes (1999) and High Houses (1996), which are currently in the SFMOMA collection. From SFMOMA's exhibition description:
Acknowledging the parallels between society's physical and psychological constructions, architect Lebbeus Woods (1940 - 2012) depicted a career-long narrative of how these constructions transform our being. Working mostly with pencil on paper, Woods created an oeuvre of complex worlds—at times abstract and at times explicit—that present shifts, cycles, and repetitions within the built environment. His timeless architecture is not in a particular style or in response to a singular moment in the field; rather, it offers an opportunity to consider how built forms are transformative for the individual and the collective, and how one person contributes to the development and mutation of the built world.
See more images from the museum's impressive Woods' collection below.
Placeholder Alt Text

A+D Showcases the Secret Life of Saarinen in New Exhibition

LA's A+D Architecture and Design Museum is presenting Eero Saarinen: A Reputation For Innovation, which opens tomorrow night. The show will highlight one of the world's most heralded mid-century architects, who designed, among other things, the St. Louis Gateway Arch, the TWA Terminal at JFK in New York, Dulles Airport in Washington D.C., and the Entenza House in Los Angeles. Saarinen was also a renowned product designer, and, unbeknownst to most, an employee for the OSS (the precursor to the CIA), where he learned many of his design techniques. The show will explore this under-documented phase of his career and bring to light a designer whose influence still resonates today. For instance, did you know that Cesar Pelli, Kevin Roche, and Robert Venturi were among the many who worked for Saarinen? Get tickets to the opening here.
Placeholder Alt Text

Diller Scofidio+Renfro Take on Exhibition Design at the Cooper-Hewitt

Design studio Diller Scofidio+Renfro (DS+R) has certainly had a very good week. As we noted yesterday, the firm’s designs for the Columbia University Medical and Graduate Education Building in Washington Heights have just been released, and now today, the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum has announced that DS+R will be working with museum staff on the redesign of the museum’s exhibition spaces that are currently under renovation on Manhattan's Upper East Side. The Cooper-Hewitt closed last July for an extensive, two-year face lift and is currently undergoing an extensive reprogramming that will increase the amount of exhibition space by 60 percent and rearrange the institution's functional divisions. Gluckman Mayner Architects, with executive architects Beyer Blinder Belle are responsible for the restoration and renovation of the institution's historic Andrew Carnegie Mansion and two adjoining row houses on 90th Street and Fifth Avenue. While the buildings are reprogrammed and historic features preserved, DS+R will be responsible for designing the new exhibitions contained in those spaces. Along with media designer Local Projects, DS+R is responsible for the visitor’s experience in both the permanent exhibition rooms on the first floor and the temporary exhibition spaces on the second and third floors. At this point in the process, neither the collaboration between Local Projects, DS+R, and the Cooper-Hewitt, nor the scope of the final product, has been decided.  Stay tuned to AN for updates on the new exhibition spaces as they emerge.
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Unseen City: Designs for a Future Chicago

There were about as many ideas for development on Chicago’s high-profile real estate at Wolf Point as there are Chicagoans. One you didn’t hear about during Alderman Brendan Reilly’s initial public meeting was The Clean Tower—a supertall that would return filtered wastewater to the Chicago River beneath its slanted profile. The Clean Tower wasn’t actually on the table for Wolf Point, but it does occupy real estate on the Chicago Architecture Foundation’s model of downtown. That’s because it’s part of Unseen City: Designs for a Future Chicago, an exhibition of imaginative projects from Illinois Institute of Technology's “Hi-Rise, Lo-Carb” studio. Hi-Rise, Lo-Carb—led by Antony Wood of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH), and Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture—begat six projects, including a vertical neighborhood in the Loop complete with “streets in the sky,” and a "Post [Waste] Office" that envisions the vacant Old Chicago Main Post Office as a sustainable waste management center with a rooftop arboretum. This is the first time the Chicago Architecture Foundation has opened up its model of downtown for use as an exhibit space, and Unseen City is an excellent start. The model’s urban context legitimizes the ambitions of these inventive projects — placed alongside existing institutions in the Loop, they inspire progressive thoughts. Glimpse the unseen city in the lobby of the Santa Fe building, 224 S. Michigan Ave., through November 4.
Placeholder Alt Text

Architecture and Design Exhibitions by the Numbers

If your interested in how many people viewed Christian Marclay's The Clock exhibition at the Centre Pompidou (6,996 for its three day run) in 2011 then The Art Newspaper's yearly round up of the top exhibitions makes great reading. This year the list breaks out Architecture and Design exhibitions and New York's MoMA is the clear winner. In the list of top ten exhibitions three are from MoMA and two from Rome's MAXXI museum. The top ten architecture and design exhibitions in the world (with daily admission numbers and total attendees in parenthesis) are as follows:
  1. Talk to Me (4,942 / 518,934) MoMA
  2. Counter Space (3,750 / 82,145) MoMA
  3. Small Scale, Big Change (3,346 / 311,188) MoMA
  4. How Wine Became Modern (1,855 / 231,579) SfMoMA
  5. Frontiers of Architecture III & IV: Living (1,596 / 200,165) Louisiana (Northern Zealand, Denmark)
  6. Peter Zumthor: Serpentine Gallery Pavilion (1,493 / 161,292) Serpentine Gallery
  7. The Art of the Automobile (1,446 / 152,678) Musée des Arts Décoratifs
  8. Dominique Lemieux: Imagining Characters (1,203 / 113,631) Museo de Arte Contemporaneo (Monterrey)
  9. Framing Modernism (1,180 / 59,661) MAXXI
  10. Space & Art and Architecture from the Collection (1,159 / 236,427) MAXXI