Posts tagged with "Europe":

Placeholder Alt Text

2014 European Solar Decathlon Announces Winners

The 2014 European Solar Decathlon has come to an end, and the international student competition to design cutting edge solar houses has produced a winner: Team Rhome of Universitá Degli Studi di Roma TRE. Their house, called Rhome for denCity, received a mark of 840.63 out of 1,000 maximum points, edging out the runner-up proposals by a slim margin. Second place went to Philéas by France's Atlantic Challenge and third place to Prêt-à-Loger by TU Delft. Philéas received a score of 839.75 points, coming in only just short of the victors and first place winners Rhome for denCity. The first place Rhome for denCity house is designed as a top floor apartment in the prototype stage that is meant to be a part of a four-story housing project. The house efficiently uses solar panels to power the house whilst relying on natural ventilation to cool its inhabitants. Its design, albeit modest, is pleasant and the house itself could serve as an outline for future sustainable houses. The European Solar Decathlon also gave out six awards for the winners of certain categories such as architecture and engineering/construction. The Dutch team TU Delft took the award for sustainability and communications with their third place entry: Prêt-à-Loger. France’s Athletic Challenge also won in the category of energy efficiency with their second place entry, Philéas.
Placeholder Alt Text

Such Great Heights: CTBUH names world’s best tall buildings

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, the nonprofit arbiter on tall building design, has named its 2014 picks for best tall buildings. Among the winners are a twisting tower in Dubai, Portland's greenest retrofit, and a veritable jungle of a high-rise. The four regional winners are: The Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building, Portland, USA (Americas); One Central Park, Sydney, Australia (Asia & Australia); De Rotterdam, Rotterdam, Netherlands (Europe); and Cayan Tower, Dubai, UAE (Middle East & Africa). Portland’s Edith Green-Wendell Wyatt Federal Building is not a new building. Designed by SOM in 1974, the office tower used a pre-cast concrete façade that had begun to fail by the turn of the 21st century. Bainbridge Island, Washington-based Cutler Anderson Architects and local firm SERA modernized the 18-story, 512,474 square-foot structure that is now targeting LEED Platinum. One Central Park in Sydney uses hydroponics and heliostats to cultivate gardens and green walls throughout the tower, cooling the building and creating the world's tallest vertical garden. OMA’s De Rotterdam is the largest building in the Netherlands, and its form playfully morphs the glassy midcentury office high-rise in a way that’s part homage and part experimental deconstruction. In the Middle East, Dubai’s twisting Cayan Tower (formerly The Infinity Tower) is a 75-story luxury apartment building that turns 90 degrees over its 997-foot ascent. Remarked the CTBUH panel: “happening upon its dancing form in the skyline is like encountering a hula-hooper on a train full of gray flannel suits.” CTBUH will pick an overall “Best Tall Building Worldwide” winner at their 13th Annual Awards on November 6, at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. Their panel of judges includes Jeanne Gang, OMA’s David Gianotten, Laing O’Rourke’s David Scott, and Sir Terry Farrell, among others. OMA’s CCTV Tower in Beijing won last year’s competition. Most of the 88 contest entries were from Asia, CTBUH said, continuing that continent’s dominance of global supertall building construction. CTBUH's international conference will take place in Shanghai in September. You can find more about the 2014 CTBUH awards, including a full list of finalists, at their website.
Placeholder Alt Text

BaseCamp Bonn Young Hostel: A Quirky Vintage Indoor Camper Park

Germans have taken on a unique approach to hospitality. This past August, hotelier Michael Schloesser introduced an innovative type of lodging two miles from the city center of Bonn. By converting an old storage facility into an indoor campground, Schloesser has created what he calls the world’s first camping trailer hotel: BaseCamp Bonn Young Hostel. Inside the warehouse, numerous trailers, vintage vans, sleeping cars and motorhomes are arranged to create a typical campground setup. This unconventional hostel offers 120 beds across fifteen camping caravans. Marion Seul, film and TV outfitter, salvaged vintage mid-century American Airstreams, Pullman coaches, and camping caravans, which she then individually customized. The trailers come with faux-front lawns in order for campers to mingle with neighbors, and are each equipped with outdoor chairs and tables. Each trailer is designed after amusing themes such as “flower power” or  “safari."
Placeholder Alt Text

Holcim Awards for Sustainable Construction 2012

The Holcim Foundation for Sustainable Construction in Zurich, Switzerland has announced the winners of its 2012 Global Holcim Awards and the Holcim Innovation Prizes. Regional prize winners (15 for Global Awards and 53 for Innovation Prizes) were examined, and from them 3 Global Awards and 3 Innovation Prizes were handed out to projects that address environmental performance, social responsibility, and economic efficiency. Each of the winning projects are innovative, future-oriented, and usually have a social or cultural component as a key part of their program.  This year's jury for the Global Awards was headed by TEN Arquitectos' Enrique Norton and included critic Aaron Betsky and architect Mario Botta. The Innovation Prize Jury was led by architect Harry Gugger and included economists and engineers. Global Holcim Awards 2012 Gold Secondary school with passive ventilation system, Diébédo Francis Kéré, Kéré Architecture Gando, Burkina Faso Silver Urban remediation and civic infrastructure hub, Alfredo Brillembourg and Hubert Klumpner, Urban Think Tank São Paulo, Brazil Bronze Urban renewal and swimming-pool precinct, Tim Edler, realities united, Jan Edler, realities united, Denise Dih, DODK Holcim Innovation Awards 2012 1st Prize High-efficiency concrete formwork technology, Matthias Kohler, Gramazio & Kohler, Architektur und Digitale Fabrikation – ETH Zurich, Fabio Gramazio, Silvan Oesterle and Axel Vansteenkiste, Gramazio & Kohler, Architektur und Digitale Fabrikation – ETH Zurich Zurich, Switzerland 2nd Prize Low-cost apartments incorporating smart materials, Frank Barkow, Barkow Leibinger Architects, Prof. Regine Leibinger, Barkow Leibinger Architects and Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Architektur, Fachgebiet Baukonstruktion und Entwerfen, Prof. Dr. sc. techn. Mike Schlaich, Technische Universität Berlin,Institut für Bauingenieurwesen, Fachgebiet Entwerfen und Konstruieren - Massivbau, Germany; Matthias, Schuler, TRANSSOLAR Energietechnik Hamburg, Germany 3rd Prize Efficient fabrication system for geometrically complex building elements, Povilas Cepaitis, AA School of Architecture, Luis Enrique, Diego Ordoñez and Carlos Piles, AA School of Architecture London, UK Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow. All images courtesy Holcim Foundation. A complete list of finalists can be seen here.
Placeholder Alt Text

Quick Clicks> Brodsky’s Vienna, Seating San Fran, Wind in the West, & Explorers Underground

Day becomes night. Alexander Brodsky: It still amazes me that I became an architect will be open at the Architekturzentrum Wien in Vienna, Austria through October 3. Described by the gallery as a "total installation," Archidose also notes that during the exhibition "the day becomes night, the dimensions of space and time appear to slowly dissolve as one paces an archaeological chamber of wonders. Having returned to daylight, a selection of Brodsky's completed projects provides insights into his architectural oeuvre." (More images after the jump.) Steel becomes ribbon. Streetsblog reports that San Francisco metaphorically cut the ribbon, unveiling a new public space on the two-block Powell Street Promenade.  The Union Square shopping district is greatly improved by the eight six-foot wide Walter Hood-designed benches, constructed to resemble delicate ribbons. Above the fray. The Westerholt E-66 Observation Wind Turbine stands out among the 40 turbines in the Holtriem Wind Park: it’s unique observation deck provides visitors with panoramic views of one Europe’s largest wind farms—for a price. Visitors must climb a 297-step spiral staircase to reach the viewing deck, according to Atlas Obscura. Under the city. Produced by Silent UK, the documentary film Beneath the Surface trails urban explorers as they descend below the cities of London and Paris, says PSFK. The explorers climb through sewers, old subway lines, reminiscent of the NY Times five-day adventure last December under New York.
Placeholder Alt Text

Highlight> Avant-Garde Art in Everyday Life

Art Institute of Chicago 111 South Michigan Avenue June 11 through October 9, 2011 Soon after the turn of the last century, artists and designers from Central and Eastern Europe began producing radically innovative images and objects that remain remarkably fresh today. For the first time, the Art Institute has gathered over 300 objects from across departments to present a comprehensive view of works from the period. Bold graphics, such as John Heartfield’s cover and illustrations for Kurt Tucholsky, Deutschland, Deutschland über Alles from 1929 (above), and pared back design objects show some of the ways in which these artists sought to transform daily living, an experiment that historical events would quickly bring to an end.
Placeholder Alt Text

Euro Bulb Ban Begins

Europe's ban on incandescent light bulbs went into effect today. A New York Times report filed yesterday from Brussels brought home the air of ambivalence that has accompanied the prohibition, relating tales of some Europeans jumping eagerly on the compact fluorescent (CFL) bandwagon, others racing out to stockpile the old bulbs before retailers run out, and still others wondering, "Why are we switching?" The european ban can be seen as a bellwether for a similar phasing out that will begin to take place here in the U.S. in 2012, which I wrote about in the editorial for our 2008 Lighting Issue. Just to recap, while there is no argument in terms of the energy savings that incandescent replacement technologies such as CFLs offer, they do come with their own problems: they cost more, come with embedded electronics, contain mercury, and, most important for designers, they do not render color as well. And, let's not forget, in certain places incandescent light bulbs' inefficiency is a boon.