Posts tagged with "Ellis Island":

Placeholder Alt Text

New, bigger Statue of Liberty Museum to be built on Liberty Island

130 years after its completion, the Statue of Liberty is set to be granted a new 20,000 square foot museum to accommodate more visitors than the current museum, which lies at the statue's base on Liberty Island. The new Statue of Liberty museum will be located at the northern tip of the island, opposite the original's location. According to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), only a fifth of visitors to island can access the museum, meanwhile the Island had 4.3 million visitors last year. If plans, which are relying on private funding for the new museum are approved, the project would likely be completed in two years. The project, run by the Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation with the U.S. National Park Service, is still being planned with designs yet to be finalized. Of the 20,000 square-foot building, 15,000 square feet will be exhibition space dedicated to showcasing the statue's history, legacy, and construction details. That's eight times larger that the current space and could accommodate up to 1,200 visitors per hour, doubling the current capacity. New York firm FXFOWLE is due to lead the project and ESI Design, who are also based in New York, will design the exhibition space. Aside from capacity and space, the new museum will feature a gallery, "immersive theater," bookstore, and space for administrative purposes. Protruding shading devices will shield the museum and a sloping green roof will reflect the topography of the site. If realized, the current museum will be repurposed to house more administrative space. However, some exhibits displayed in the lobby and balcony will remain.
Placeholder Alt Text

Peek Inside Ellis Island’s abandoned hospital before it opens for tours next week

In the early 20th Century, the sprawling, 29-building Public Health Service hospital on the south shore of Ellis Island was the biggest federal hospital in the country—and possibly its most state-of-the-art. The comprehensive medical institution treated over one million newly-arrived immigrants ill with diseases like tuberculosis, measles, trachoma, and scarlet fever. Designed as a series of pavilions, the hospital has long, window-lined corridors that brought in fresh air and maximized natural light. To keep dirt and dust from piling up up in these narrow halls, concrete floors were raked in the middle and lined with drains on either edge. And to stop contaminates from drifting from room to room, no door directly faces another. In the 60 years since it closed, the former vanguard of modern medicine has been abandoned, looted, and turned into a decaying, inaccessible, ruin. But that that changes next week when the National Park Service opens up the hospital for public tours. Before that happens, AN got a sneakpeak of the fascinating, and unnervingly stunning, relic. The Public Health Service campus has not necessarily been restored, but rather preserved in a state of “arrested decay," according to Jessica Cameron-Bush who recently guided media outlets through the space. Inside the raw building, concrete is chipped, windowpanes are cracked, wood is splintered, and weeds have gained ground. But the hospital is structurally sound says the National Park Service and the non-profit Save Ellis Island which raised funds to reopen the structure. Together, these groups have also commissioned an art installation called "Unframed - Ellis Island" to coincide with the public tours, and serve as a reminder of what the space once was. Throughout the hospital, artist JR has stuck life-size recreations of historic photographs that depict the doctors, patients, and families who walked the halls long before any of us showed up. Hard hat tours of the hospital start on October 1st and will be limited to 10 people per group. Currently, there will be tours four days a week, but the schedule could expand next year. Proceeds from tour sales will go toward the complex's continued restoration. Tours will be organized through Statue Cruises.
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile

Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile Museum of the City of New York 1220 5th Avenue, New York Through September 7th Coming to New York City from Washington, D.C., this exhibition illuminates the legacy of architect and builder Rafael Guastavino. A Catalan immigrant, Guastavino created the iconic (and aptly named) Guastavino tile. By interlocking terracotta tiles and layers of mortar to build his arches, Guastavino married old-world aesthetics with modern innovation. The resulting intersection of technology and design revolutionized New York City’s landscape, and is used in over 200 historic buildings including Grand Central Terminal, Carnegie Hall, The Bronx Zoo’s Elephant House, and Ellis Island. Guastavino’s son, Rafael III, is part of the family legacy explored in the exhibition. MCNY has expanded this showing to include 20 more projects found throughout New York City’s five boroughs. The exhibition also boasts an 11-by-15-foot replica of a Guastavino vault, contemporary photos by Michael Freeman, previously unreleased drawings and materials, and a video gallery installation that visually immerses the viewer in Guastavino’s vaults.
Placeholder Alt Text

Slideshow> Ellis Island West

When anyone thinks of U.S. immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries they picture Ellis Island. But the West Coast's counterpart was the US Immigration Station at Angel Island, a 1910 collection of modest timber buildings located off the coast of Tiburon, just outside San Francisco. Until the end of World War II thousands of immigrants arrived here; most from the far east. And while Ellis Island was no picnic, this was an even harder place. Technically a detention center, its crowded barracks held hundreds of people for up to a year at a time. Thanks to California State Parks' recent $20 million renovation by SF-based Architectural Resources Group and Tom Eliot Fisch, you can now visit. To capture detainees' authentic experiences, the architects left the barracks virtually as they found them (plus a renovated entry stair and support infrastructure and minus the grime and the crowds of huddled masses)— including holes in the walls, peeling paint, and even etchings in the walls in several languages. With the help of exhibit designer Daniel Quan they also recreated life scenes, using artifacts like tables, chairs and clothing that had been in storage.  The next phase of work will include a large art installation on the site of the old administration building (to be decided by an international competition) and a new education center, built into the island's former hospital. Explore the project in this slideshow. Click a thumbnail to launch the slideshow. All photos courtesy David Wakely.
Placeholder Alt Text

The Other Side of Ellis Island

Most visitors to Ellis Island only get to see the Ellis Island Immigration Museum. I was fortunate enough to go on a hard hat tour of the island's south side, which is not open to the public, and explore newly stabilized structures including the new ('new' as of 1934) ferry building and part of the old South Side Hospital Complex.