Posts tagged with "Doban Architecture":

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Product> Trade Secrets: Architects Share Their Product Picks

From Andre Kikoski to Leo Marmol to David Mullman, top architects spill the beans on their favorite products—glazing, surfaces, and finish materials. Lasvit Liquidkristal A molded-glass sheet suitable for interior and exterior applications, the relief pattern is continuous between panels. “In Sophie’s restaurant at Saks Fifth Avenue in Chicago, we installed a wall of digitally-engineered Liquidkristal by Lasvit. The optical effects of cascading ripples of glass create playful reflections, painterly distortions, and elegant abstract patterns that are beautiful in their subtlety and striking in their boldness.” —Andre Kikoski, Andre Kikoski Architect, New York City lutron_1of2 Lutron Dorma Digitally controlled commercial lighting-control and monitoring system. Compatible with dimming ballasts. “Lutron and its EcoSystem node allows for multiple lighting atmospheres that enable us to create unique spatial environments, while saving our clients money on their electrical bills.” —Ricardo Alvarez-Diaz, Alvarez-Diaz & Villalon Architecture and Interior Design, Miami/San Juan duravit_HappyD2_2of2 Duravit Happy D.2 Offered in pedestal, console, and surface-mounted models; with or without tap platform. “We love the simplicity and rounded corners of the Happy D.2 sink from Duravit. It has enough presence to stand on its own as a wall-mounted unit, but can sit happily atop an elegant modern vanity as well. It’s our go-to sink!” —Susan Doban, Doban Architecture, New York City health_ceramics_1of2 Heath Ceramics Sun Valley Bronze Seven in-stock collections of field, trim, and dimensional tile; custom orders accepted. LEED eligible. “We love the handcrafted, high-quality products that Heath creates; its wonderful tile adorns many of our projects, and we share a set of core design principles that celebrates the efficiency and elegance of modern design.” —Leo Marmol, Marmol Radziner, Los Angeles luceplan-trama-parete-soffitto-2 Luceplan Trama Available as suspension and ceiling/wall model, in 20-inch or 25-inch diameter. Aluminum with polycarbonate diffuser. “The Luceplan Trama fixture gives lots of beautiful light and it’s amazingly easy to change the bulb. For us, it’s often the vendor that is as significant as the product; nothing is more important than good service and help when you need it.” —David Mullman, Mullman Seidman Architects, New York City vorwerk Vorwerk Re/Cover Green SPVC-free, roll-based floor covering. High slip-resistance. Offered in 30 solid colors and patterns. LEED eligible. “Engineered textiles sourced from sustainable materials—like the Re/Cover line by Vorwerk—is what made us select Relative Space as a design partner at Barclays Center.” —Ayumi Sugiyama, SHoP Architects, New York City nawkaw Nawkaw LiTHIUM Concrete and Masonry Stains Suitable for use on masonry and pre-cast concrete surfaces, the stain is offered in 40 colors, as well as metallic and reflective finishes. “For exteriors where we can’t match the brick color or where some stucco or coating has been applied to the masonry, one of products that we like a lot these days is LiTHIUM by Nawkaw. It’s similar to paint, but it’s not a film; it actually forms a chemical bond with the surface of the masonry.” —Jerry Caldari, Bromley Caldari Architects, New York City hansgrohe_CromaGreenShowerpipe Hansgrohe Croma Green Showerpipe Assembly includes both Raindance S 150 AIR Green 1-jet showerhead and Croma E 100 Green 3-jet handshower. “In hotel renovations, we see a trend to replace the traditional bathtub with a shower. The Croma Green Showerpipe, with its all-in-one, outside-the-wall design is easy to install and service—things which are always a concern, especially in the hospitality sector. The handshower is not only great for guest bathing, but also ideal from a housekeeping perspective.” —Foreman Arden Rodgers, TVS Design, Atlanta
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Doban Architecture′s Academic Center: Think Fabricate

Fabrikator Brought to you by: 

A custom-built environment allows faculty and students to work collaboratively at a new academic center in the Bronx.

Doban Architecture has a longstanding history with Monroe College. In 2009, the Brooklyn-based firm founded by Susan Doban completed a modular pod design for the Bronx school’s loft-style dormitories at 565 Main Street, a building for which they had also worked on an award-winning facade restoration. Last fall, the firm completed a renovation of the school’s 2,360-square-foot academic center with a scheme that allows students and faculty to interact in a collaborative environment. Neither of these projects would have been possible without Think Fabricate, the firm’s sister company. Co-founded by Doban and Jason Gorsline in November 2009, the design studio handles design projects across a range of disciplines—furniture, product, graphic, and industrial—in addition to operating its own fabrication shop in a shared East Williamsburg workspace. The academic center’s mission of tutoring students in English and math challenged Think Fabricate to design furnishings that would create a functional environment for students and teachers, some of whom would have an office there. “The student body has a lot of adult learners and people taking classes in the evening,” said Doban. “The college wanted the academic center to be really appealing to students, and they wanted faculty to be drawn to the space as well.” Oriented in storefront spaces off the Main Hall’s corridor, the academic center is distinguished by dark colors and a new security and reception desk, while glass in a range of transparencies lets students see in and out. In the main workspace, laminate tables allow two students and a teacher to share a sliding white board or computer, for which each individual has his own keyboard. Group meeting tables are similarly designed for collaboration with a “headless” shape, where anyone can be seen as the table’s leader. Built-in maple and laminate seating nooks further encourage students to congregate and share ideas.
  • Fabricator Think Fabricate
  • Architect Doban Architecture
  • Location New Rochelle, New York
  • Completion Date September 2010
  • Material Panel-Lam, maple
  • Process CNC mill, table saw
Nearby, five prefabricated offices function as cubicles for faculty. “The appeal is that they don’t look like cubicles,” said Doban. Designed as one-on-one meeting spaces, each office has a built-in workstation and four walls, one of which is a sliding door mounted on Haefele hardware hidden in the header of the office system. The panelized walls are a combination of maple, chosen for appearance, price, and durability and milled with CNC equipment, and pre-laminated Panel-Lam sheets. As in its dormitory project, Think Fabricate opted to work with Panel-Lam because of its range of colors and textures coupled with its relatively low cost and durability. Because the material is slightly brittle, the approximately 4-foot-square, ¾-inch-thick sheets are cut with a table saw. “We try to minimize material waste so we weren’t really considerate of the grain directions at all times,” said Gorsline, whose background is in furniture design and fabrication. “It became another detail of the system.” Wall panels were prefabricated in the workshop, then attached with screws to wooden frames. Save for the corner office, the cubes are 6 by 8 feet, providing enough room for a student and teacher to sit comfortably. Hall-facing panels have windows to ensure the rooms are never fully closed off, and if the offices ever need to be moved or reconfigured, the system can easily be broken down and relocated. Doban and Gorsline see the prefabricated offices as a prototype design that could work in a range of settings; they plan to explore mass and limited production options in the future. In the meantime, they are perfecting the design by hand.
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Quick Clicks> Lost, Super, Speed, Parking

Parking Slope. A parking lot in Park Slope, Brooklyn could soon sprout an 11-story, 166-room hotel designed by Doban Architecture (pictured above). Curbed stopped by a community meeting last Thursday and reports Hotel Grand Prospect has extended the neighborhood an olive branch in the form of a 400-car parking garage which has won over some community members. The project is still in its early phases and traffic and environmental studies have yet to be completed. (More at Curbed.) Superstreet. North Carolina State University just published a study about a time-saving (for cars) intersection layout called the "superstreet." While researchers show the layout reduced automobile travel times and improved the car-crash rate, the aerial view shown on the NCSU page looks far from super in terms of multimodal transportation options. No sidewalks or crosswalks (and a super-low density neighborhood) could easily outweigh the "superstreet" benefits. (Via Urban Planning Blog.) Lost Brother. Located in the middle of the East River, North Brother Island and its quarantine hospital have been abandoned for 48 years resulting in some amazing ruin photography. Richard Nickel, Jr. at the Kingston Lounge has posted a series of photos from the island along with its history. Owned by the New York City Parks Department, Brotherly Island is closed to the public and is a protected nesting ground (Via Gothamist.) High Speed Fighting. California's battle for High Speed Rail races on. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood wrote in to contest an anti-High Speed Rail editorial in the Washington Post last week. LaHood opposed the notion that the west corridor isn't dense enough to support the proposed rail system. The fight won't be over for a long time, so stay tuned. King. Happy Martin Luther King, Jr. Day! Check out AN's recent coverage of the planned $20 million upgrades to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis at the Lorraine Hotel where King was assassinated in 1968.