Posts tagged with "Diller Scofidio + Renfro":

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Fire Island Pines Pavilion to Rise from Ashes

Facebook was aflame this morning with new renderings by HWKN (Hollwich Kushner) for Fire Island's notorious Pavilion, the entertainment complex that burned down last November. In January, it was reported in The New York Times that Diller Scofidio + Renfro were signed on to do the master plan for the marina, of which the Pavilion sits at the center and serves as the social hub. Amidst rumors that the complex's most recent owners, Andrew Kirtzman, Seth Weissman and Matthew Blesso, were more intent on selling the property  than building there, the new renderings are a tantalizing tease of what could be. Indeed, the town center, such as it is, has always stood in humble contrast to high stylings of homes hidden behind thickets of bamboo. Architect and historian Christopher Rawlins, whose upcoming book on Horace Gifford highlights several houses in the Pines, noted that since the 1960s the marina was always well-used if utilitarian. The new complex would represent a definitive shift in the culture, both local and at large. "It would be the first instance of distinguished commercial architecture in a place that up to now has only had distinguished residential architecture," said Rawlins. In addition to Gifford, Andrew Geller, Harry Bates, and Earl Combs all built on the island. A reliable source told AN that the new designs would include prefab elements alongside the rough-hewn wood. The space would also be amenable for open air weddings as well as an air conditioned/soundproofed area for late night debauchery. Designs for the temporary structure for this season are reportedly being held up by permits, though HWKN certainly have their pavilion (lower p) cred through designs for PS1.
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Watch the Broad Museum Come to Life in Real-Time

While cameras allowing real-time viewing of work on downtown LA’s Broad museum have been in place since construction began last fall, the scenery is finally getting more interesting. The structure’s parking garage is now complete and construction permits were recently approved for the museum itself, according to LA Downtown News. The intricately-clad concrete building, designed by architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro, is on schedule for a late 2013 completion. The three-story structure will include about “50,000 square feet of gallery space on two floors, a lecture hall for up to 200 people, and a public lobby with display space and a museum shop,” as described by the Broad Art Foundation. The budget is $130 million. The Live Construction Cam at the Broad Art Foundation site is accompanied by time-lapse camera capturing high resolution pictures updated every 15 minutes. The site also allows viewers to stream a time-lapse movie documenting progress on the site over time.
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Lincoln Center LED Steps on Fritz

When the construction blockades at Lincoln Center  renovation finally came down down last year, the flowing crowds and fountain crowding returned. The first impression theater-goers get of the Diller Scofido + Renfro renovation are the flashing from LED lights embedded into the steps facing Columbus Avenue. The lights function as an underfoot marquee with titles of various productions flashing and scrolling across the steps, announcing venues and lighting the path. But last Tuesday night the lights seemed to be on the fritz. Elsewhere, the Hugh Hardy 130 seat theater addition atop the Vivian Beaumont Theater is nearing completion...
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Design for Final Segment of High Line Revealed!

Tonight, the design team from the High Line will present plans for Section 3 to the community.  Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe will introduce James Corner from the project's lead team, James Corner Field Operations, and Ricardo Scofidio from Diller Scofidio + Renfro. High Line co-founder Robert Hammond will moderate a post presentation discussion. Unlike the last two sections of the High Line, Section 3 will be intimately integrated with one major developer, as opposed to a variety of property owners and stakeholders. From 30th to 34th Street, the High Line wraps around Hudson Yards, the 12 million square foot office and residential district being developed by Related Companies. Much of the new section will be built cheek by jowl with Related's construction. At the westernmost section overlooking the Hudson River, an interim walkway will span the existing self-seeded landscape, so as coordinated design efforts alongside Related's development and give Friends of the High Line time to raise more funds. The estimated total cost of capital construction on the High Line at the rail yards is $90 million. Construction is expected to be complete by the end of 2013 with a full public opening in spring 2014. All renderings courtesy Friends of the High Line. Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow.
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DS+R Takes it Higher

Diller Scofidio + Renfro is climbing ever higher near the High Line with their first ever skyscraper.  The Wall Street Journal reports that the firm was selected by Related Development to work with the Rockwell Group on an 800 foot tall, 700 unit residential building that will play well with its architectural cousin next door. Elizabeth Diller tells the paper the architects are “very conscious of the adjacency to the High Line.” Indeed. DS+R, along with Field Operations, will be unveiling plans for the third and final section of the High Line at a community meeting tonight. Public School 11 Auditorium 
320 West 21st, RSVP to railyards@thehighline.org.
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DS+R and OLIN To Spin Granite Web In Aberdeen

Yesterday voters in Aberdeen, Scotland narrowly approved a plan to transform Union Terrace Gardens in the heart of the city into an ambitious hybrid park and cultural center designed by Diller, Scofidio + Renfro with OLIN, according to The Scotsman. The project is estimated to cost £140 million, though Sir Ian Wood, an oil services tycoon, has pledged £50 million toward the project. Aberdeen is known as the Granite City, and the design creates a new series of granite pathways criss-crossing over the sloping site, dividing it into different programmatic zones, including an amphitheater, exhibition hall, and a number of gardens.
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Cornell Chooses Six Finalists for Tech Campus

And then there were six. Cornell University announced that six firms were selected from a field of 43 contenders to design their new tech campus on Roosevelt Island. SOM, the firm that pushed Cornell over the top in the national competition to build on Roosevelt is still in the running, alongside OMA (Office for Metropolitan Architecture)
, Diller Scofidio + Renfro
, Morphosis Architects
, Steven Holl Architects
, and Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. SOM will remain on the job to define an overall campus plan. The university is still running with its net-zero plan for the first core building. Residences and other multi-use buildings will follow. A contract with the winning firm is set to be signed in April.
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Inside the Archtober Building of the Day #25: Alice Tully Hall at Julliard

Rather than add a few hundred more words to the tens of thousands already devoted to praise the Diller Scofidio + Renfro / FXFOWLE renovation of the Julliard School and Alice Tully Hall, I think today that I will remember the original architect, Pietro Belluschi (1899-1994). As a young faculty member at the University of Virginia, I got to know his work a bit. He designed the UVA School of Architecture. The building was muscular, had clear structure, and well expressed the late 1960s/early ‘70s last gasps of Brutalism. Belluschi was born in Italy, where he earned a degree in civil engineering at the University of Rome. When an opportunity came to move to Portland, Oregon, in the 1920s, he took a position in the architectural office of A.E. Doyle, eventually rising to full partner after the founders passed away. Eventually he gave up his Portland practice to take on the deanship at MIT in 1951. The academic position enabled him to consult on many interesting projects, including with Walter Gropius on the Pan Am Building (now Met Life), and with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill on a number of projects. He designed the Julliard School and Alice Tully Hall, a travertine clad essay in late Brutalism which opened in 1969. In 1972, he received the AIA Gold Medal—the highest individual award given by the AIA. You can still see his handiwork—mutated and dematerialized by the expansion of the Julliard School out to Broadway. Benjamin Gilmartin, AIA, of Diller Scofidio + Refro, and acoustician Mark Holden of JaffeHolden conducted today’s tour of the Hall—so there was a lot of talk about the finer points of its acoustics. Holden noted that the original hall had what he called “B+” acoustics, but that because of the aging of the original wood interior—likened by Gilmartin to that of the General Assembly chamber at the United Nations—the sound had lost its “sheen and clarity.” A lot was made of the “intimacy” of the hall. It is covered with a “superskin,” it “blushes” as veneer composite panels are illuminated from behind. I liked the portrait of Alice Tully, standing tall in gold-encrusted evening garb at the age of 80 with her trusty white moppet of a pooch resting at her feet sporting tiny blue satin bows on his ears. She elegantly greets the donors as they proceed to the upper level lobby with the outdoor balcony. It was in use as a conference room when we passed through. Surprisingly underwhelming finishes up there…just gray felt on the walls and grey carpet. I kind of missed those old chandeliers. -Cynthia Phifer Kracauer, AIA For the info on the tour of today’s Building of the Day click here: David Rebenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center. Each “Building of the Day” has received a Design Award from the AIA New York Chapter. For the rest of the month—Archtober—we will write here a personal account about the architectural ideas, the urban contexts, programs, clients, technical innovations, and architects that make these buildings noteworthy. Daily posts will track highlights of New York’s new architecture.
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Arquitectonica Cozies Up to DS+R in LA

Diller Scofidio + Renfro's Broad center for contemporary art features a distinctive structural honeycomb facade. It may be getting a neighbor with another notable facade, a new 19 story apartment building with staggered windows in a variety of sizes designed by Miami-based Arquitectonica. According to blogdowntown, the building would include 258 units with 52 set aside for affordable housing and 308 parking spaces in a three level below-grade garage. Developed by Related Companies, the tower would share the plaza with DS+R's museum and back up to the planned Regional Connector light rail station.
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Reflecting the Stars on the Hudson

With the High Line getting the lion's share of attention lately, Hudson River Park feels more neighborhoody then ever. Last night's opening of public art installation by artist/performer Jon Morris of Windmill Factory felt pretty down home with everyone sprawling out on the grass around Morris, who explained the inspiration for his light show which sits out in the water. Growing up in Beria, Kentucky, Morris could see the stars, but in New York light pollution made the experience impossible.  His idea was to sprinkle a little stardust onto the Hudson in the form of solar powered LEDs attached to the tops of pilings from a long departed pier. New Yorkers are in the midst of a deep infatuation with their industrial past. Call it nostalgia, call it reappropriation, call it what you will, but nowhere is it better exemplified than in the High Line. And so there's probably no one better to comment on new art using old infrastructure than Charles Renfro, of High Line-designers Diller Scofidio+Renfro. Renfro recalled how Morris approached him with the idea of placing lights on the pilings about two years ago. Renfro asked him a few key questions: Have you contacted anyone at the Army Corps of Engineers? (No.) Do you know anyone from Hudson River Park? (He did, a friend of a friend who knew somebody.) What about the technical logistics? (He knew someone who worked at Google.) The friend from Google became one of the key players in the installation. Adam Berenzweig is used to dealing with rooms full of computer power, but here he was dealing kilobytes and radio technology, that go under water twice a day at high tide. "It was pretty thorny," he said. The biggest surprise about the project is the relatively low cost, around $25,000. And that it was completed in two years, from concept to execution. Renfro said he was surprised that the project got past Riverkeepers, the the Hudson's ever-vigilant oyster bed protectors. At the river's edge a panel overlooking the pier sends a signal out to the lights, which respond by forming a constellation. When not acting as Orion, the lights dim and flicker gently, shifting from cobalt blue to white. The scene is quiet and subtle, perhaps best happened upon rather than sought out.
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QUICK CLICKS> Human Helicopter, Enchanted Mosque, Getty Leads, Suburbia

60 Seconds Helicopter. The Sikorsky Prize is legendary, for it has not yet been awarded--it's still awaiting its first winner, whose human-powered helicopter will reach an altitude of 3 meters (10 feet) during a flight lasting at least 60 seconds, while remaining in a 10 meter square (32.8 foot square). But Inhabitat reports that if things go as planned, a team of students from the University of Maryland may be taking home the prize with their human-powered flying machine, the Gamera. BIG's beautified universe. Metropolis deconstructs the renderings of Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)'s latest project: a mosque complex in Tirana, Albania. While the thoughtful octagonal design (an overlap of the Mecca orientation and Tirana's urban grid) may have put BIG in front of the competition, one can't help wonder if the seductive juxtaposition of photo-realism and and benign atmospheric glow in BIG's renderings may be the secret to the firm's running marathon of competition wins. More Getty Trust. Christopher Knight at  The Los Angeles Times raises a good point regarding the J. Paul Getty Trust's appointment of James Cuno, currently director of the Art Institute of Chicago, as Trust president and chief executive: It might be a brilliant idea to appoint him to the directorship for the Getty Museum, finally merging the two positions. Suburbia Objectified? Allison Arieff of The New York Times comments on the recently launched Open House, a collaborative project in which the Dutch design collective Droog and Diller Scofidio + Renfro architects imagined "future suburbia." She laments that the project missed the point-- by treating a real place (Levittown) as a "perfect blank canvas" and dodging "the real issues."    
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Much Ado About Nothing At Grand Avenue

Curbed LA yesterday shared schemes for the zone around Diller Scofidio + Renfro's Broad Museum, revealing renderings of two residential towers to the south and east of the project and space for a new plaza.  The images sent the ever-excitable architecture community chattering. But while it's great to get a better sense of what's going up, as the blog pointed out and the architects have reiterated, the images don't reveal what the design will actually look like. Developed by LA firm Grant Price Architects, the plans were part of a "Concept Study" for LA's Community Redevelopment Agency through developer Related Companies to explore the various configurations on the site. "It’s too early to get an idea of what they could do around the museum,"  Ted Ogami, Associate Director at Grant Price told AN. "It’s going to go through a number of iterations before they decide what to do." So we still need to wait until DS+R and Broad roll out their scheme for the area. DS+R Senior Associate Kevin Rice, the project director, confirmed that the firm is working under the assumption that they will likely design the plaza, but won't start work on it until that's confirmed in the next few months . Curbed did reveal that an architect for one of the towers is likely to be revealed in 30 days. More things to wait for. So be patient.