Posts tagged with "Diller Scofidio + Renfro":

The Future Is Video

When CAD rose up in the '80s and began replacing hand-drawing as the preferred means of rendering architecture-to-be, practitioners began decrying the death of the field. Obviously that was not the case, but in our increasingly digitized age/culture/lives, where sexy renderings predominate (to the cost of real architectural discourse, some might say, and probably rightly) on blogs and, uh, architectural websites and beyond, videos are becoming an increasingly important component of the process of placemaking. Or at least competitionwinning, as the above video by SPF:architects shows. When we first turned it up on Curbed today, we were taken aback by the lengths (some might call it desperation, but in these hard times, who can blame them) the firm had gone to to convince the judges of the worthiness of their entry in a competition to design Calgary's new Cantos project, billed as the only "national music centre" in Canada. Turns out, though, all entrants had to produce a video, including Diller Scofidio+Renfro, allied works architecture, Atelier Jean Nouvel, and the lone Canadian firm, Montreal's Saucier + Perotte. Since the LA-based SPF's is naturally Hollywood flashy, how do the other four stack up? Hey! We recognize that cut-out. Rip off! Playing the buildings? Where have we seen that before? For a Pritzker Prize-winner, this sure is chintzy. Dig the tunes.

Lights, Camera, High Line!

Sundance Channel recently launched a new online video series titled “High Line Stories,” profiling activists, artists, architects, landscape architects, City officials, and celebrities involved in turning the abandoned elevated railroad track into a park paradise.

Including commentary by Adam Gopnik of The New Yorker, Adrian Benepe, Commissioner, New York City Dept. of Parks & Recreation, Amanda Burden, Chair, New York City Planning Commission, James Corner, landscape architect for the High Line, and Piet Oudolf, planting designer for the High Line, Diane von Furstenberg, fashion designer, Ric Scofidio and Liz Diller, High Line architects, Ethan Hawke, Joel Sternfeld, photographer, Robert Hammond and Joshua David, Co-Founders, Friends of the High Line, and Kevin Bacon, the ten featured episodes explore the profiled individuals relationship to the High Line as well as the structure's impact on the city. Even without the commentary, these breathtaking panoramic video shots are sure to get you excited for the park’s official opening next month.

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Liz Diller Is Tone Deaf

Or so she just told WNYC. The clip was aired during Morning Edition, but as Soterios Johnson (LOVE HIM!) directed us to the web for a complete recap and more, the interview actually appears to be from yesterday's episode of Soundcheck. Thanks to the magic of the Internet, you can find the full clip above, as well as a video tour after the jump. And as Johnson gamely noted, be sure to tune in Sunday for the building's debut performance, which will air live. Think those improved acoustics carry over to radio. If this weren't enough, Soundcheck host Jonathan Schaefer shares his thoughts on the Alice Tully on the Soundcheck Blog:
Alice Tully Hall is in exactly the same place as it always was; the renovation was unable to change the “footprint” of the hall within the larger building, or to move walls or even seats. These restrictions make the changes that have been made all the more impressive. The vaguely modernist look of the hall has changed to an organic warmth. [...] It used to be that walking into Alice Tully Hall was like boarding a submarine - there was no natural light to speak of, and the lobby had all the charm of a Knights of Columbus hall. Now, everything is glass; you can see across 65th Street, or out to Broadway. It’s a phenomenon familiar to any NYC apartment dweller: you don’t realize how important natural light is to an apartment until you finally get a place that actually has it. Then you wonder how you ever lived in the half-lit dingy old place of yours for so long.
Obviously, Mr. Schaefer is a Manhattanite. We've got plenty of sky here in Brooklyn. Lincoln Centers, not so much, though. We'll call it a draw.