Posts tagged with "David Rockwell":

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Six stunning surfaces for the kitchen and bath

This collection of colorful tiles—acrylic, terra-cotta, and porcelain—creates surfaces that are equally durable and beautiful, taking any room to the next level.
Gonzaga Christina Celestino x Fornace Brioni Milan-based architect and designer Christina Celestino dreamed up a collection of motifs based on designs typically found in Italian 15th-century paint on pavimenti in cotto (terra-cotta floors). Following on typical patterns of light, perspective, and draped effects, the assortment of tiles is dominated by gray and variegated terra-cotta, giving it a markedly Renaissance air, in line with the period’s ideals of beauty and harmony. Fence Iris Ceramica x Diesel Living A chain-link fence and mesh coatings, this collection is a mélange of white on white, white on black, and of course, black on black.   Cover Patricia Urquiola for Mutina Patricia Urquiola, Spanish architect and designer (and adopted Italian), has designed various collections for Mutina since 2008, but Cover marks her first stint with large ceramic slabs. The collection came about from an experimental project using clay blended with a mixture of micro-grit, which is then used as a base for the colored patterns applied using the silk screen method. Tonal Collection David Rockwell x Bisazza David Rockwell designed a graphic, vibrant tile range comprising a suite of patterns available in four color families (one is a new color developed just for the designer, called “David Rockwell Blue”). Starting from the existing collection Cementiles, the patterns are based on ombrés, a visual spectrum from one color to another, or, in his mind, something that feels like “a kind of illusion." Agatha Lotus Maison Valentina Influenced by the delicate folds of a lotus flower, this design is done with a succession of parallel lines that weave together in a ring of earth tones. Each tile is digitally printed on two aluminum sheets with a polyethylene core. High Line La Fabbrica Slate natural stone was the main ingredient for a tile collection inspired by the rough train tracks along the trail of New York’s High Line park. Four colors of marbled tile express a kind of weathered look akin to the footpath raised above 11th Avenue.
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Daniel Libeskind to Deliver Keynote Address for Dwell on Design in New York

On October 9, Daniel Libeskind marks the opening of Dwell on Design NY, a three-day event bringing together design luminaries for discussions and presentations on urban design and architecture. Other speakers at the conference include architect David Rockwell, Pentagram partner Michael Bierut, Designtex CEO Susan Lyons, Claire Fellman of Snøhetta, and many others. Highlights of Dwell on Design NY include self-guided tours of private residences in Tribeca, the Flatiron district, Harlem, and Soho; the curated retail Dwell Store; and CEU sessions. More information is available on the Dwell on Design website.
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The Great GoogaMooga is coming to Prospect Park

Superfly Presents, the co-founder and producer of mega-festivals Bonnaroo and Outside Lands, is bringing its park-packing swagger to New York City this summer. The Great GoogaMooga, described as "an amusement park of food and drink," will occupy the Nethermead region of Brooklyn's Prospect Park on May 19th and 20th. The famed pastoral lower meadow of the park will be transformed into "the ultimate sensory experience" by a collaborative design effort led by David Rockwell of the Rockwell Group. The design weaves together to over 75 food vendors, 35 brewers, 30 winemakers and 20 live musicians debut festival. General admission is required but tickets are required and available as of March 15. The event intends to leverage the synergy of two of New York City's most high-energy features: food and music. The Great GoogaMooga, as many extended festivals increasingly tend to do, will focus a large amount of its attention on food. To develop the event concept with Rockwell, Superfly has brought together a number of top chefs and hospitality industry gurus like Anthony Bourdain, Allan Benton, Marcus Samuelsson, Eddie Huang, Garrett Oliver, and many more, with a goal of bringing some of New York’s most loved dining destinations to Prospect Park. Among the festival’s growing list of vendors are Tom Colicchio’s Colicchio & Sons, April Bloomfield and Ken Friedman’s The Spotted Pig, Roberta’s, Christina Tosi’s Momofuku Milk Bar, Daniel Boulud’s DBGB Kitchen & Bar, M.Wells, Do or Dine, Frankies 457 Spuntino, Russ & Daughters and the Big Gay Ice Cream Shop (click here for a full list of participants).   As "the Creative Capital of New York City and an international culinary destination," Brooklyn is the perfect location for such an event, effused Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz in a statement. But while Brooklyn plays host to throngs of hungry, thirsty park-goers in May, those who like the serenity of the local Olmstedian landscape may want to head to Central Park.  

Eavesdrop> Smoke and Mirrors

Architect and set designer David Rockwell will be waving his wand over a new Broadway production based on the life of Harry Houdini. But this time, Rockwell won’t just be creating the sets, he’ll also be co-producing. The idea has been in the works for years, and now Rockwell and a glitzy team—Hugh Jackman in the leading role, Aaron Sorkin on the script, Jack O’Brien as director, and Kurt Andersen, who helped develop the project, as creative consultant—will conjure HOUDINI into reality by 2014.
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QUICK CLICKS> Xanadu, Photog Fury, Think Space

Not Me! The architect of record for the much beleaguered Xanadu mall in New Jersey went on the record with northjersey.com. David Jansen said the garish colors weren't his idea. It appears  he was called in to save the day after David Rockwell washed his hands of the multi-billion dollar debacle. Rechristened the American Dream @ Meadowlands the project got a fresh infusion of cash from the Mall of America and NJ State taxpayers are kicking in $200 million in low interest financing (that's almost as much as state will have to pay the Feds for canceling the Hudson Tunnel Project). The project got so out of hand that The Times sponsored a contest for readers to reimagine Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan", aka - Xanadu. Don't shoot! Architectural photographer Grant Smith is mad as hell. After taking a photo of a London church he was surrounded by a bunch of bobbies who thought he was a terrorist. Unbeige reports that on World Press Freedom Day the photog took his grievances to the street. He and dozens of other shutterbugs descended on London City Hall wearing signs proclaiming, "I'm a photographer not a terrorist." Freudian Facades. The Wall Street Journal reports that the "real cutting edge of architecture has to do with the psychology of buildings." The august paper interviewed a few scientists about how space design can effect worker productivity. For accuracy and focus, confined spaces painted red work well. While creative types benefit from high ceilings, lots of windows and bright blue walls. Maybe, but sometimes a room is just a room.            
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Quick Clicks> Glass, Steel, Foam, Reel

Glass wear. Alistair Gordon visits the entrancingly translucent Maison de Verre in Paris, Pierre Chareau's 1928 house of glass blocks, and speaks with current owner Robert M. Rubin about his ongoing restoration of the early modernist icon. Here's a preview of Gordon's feature that will appear in the next WSJ Magazine. Steely resolve. The Calatrava-designed PATH hub for the World Trade Center is now over budget to the tune of $180 million, reports DNA. The stratospheric overrun is due in large part to the decision to use extra steel to "harden" the building for security reasons. The Port Authority Board passed the revised budget on Thursday morning, promising to bankroll the extra costs with a contingency fund. Featuring...foamcore! San Francisco's Museum of Craft commandeers a space near the Moscone Center for a pop-up installation that presents architectural model-making as a form of craft. The show offers a glimpse into the process of 20 notable SF-area architecture firms, writes the San Francisco Chronicle. Awards go immaterial. Producers Bruce Cohen and Don Mischer talk to the Hollywood Reporter about the set design for this year's Oscars (airing this Sunday), revealing that they'll rely on projections to create a constantly changing, animated environment within the Kodak Theater. Architect David Rockwell, who designed the sets in 2009 and 2010 (and snagged an Emmy in the process), this year passed the torch to production designer Steve Bass.
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Americans at the Door

Last night at Material ConneXion Italian door manufacturer Lualdi unveiled its first collection of doors designed by U.S.-based architects. Dror Benshetrit's lacquered red Davina door stole the show with a diagonally folded design that makes the door appear slightly ajar when closed. Benshetrit explained to that the idea for the design came from the diagonal line that architect's use to indicate a reflective surface in sketches. The secret to the door's off-kilter appearance? A special hinge at the top that keeps the pivot points in line. The door, also in black or white, had a magnetic closure and a slim stainless handle, but the designer mentioned that another handle based on the door's design was in the works with Valli & Valli. David Rockwell presented a robust walnut design with a leather-wrapped bar inspired by his hand-carved Chambers Hotel entrance doors. The design has several options, with a thin metal frame and a horizontal stripe that can be customized. Robert A.M. Stern also delivered his take on modern-traditional style with three doors that reinterpret the classic New York pre-war apartment entrance. The full collection is available for pre-order now, and Lualdi plans to come knocking for more American designs in the future.
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Rockwell makes a ruckus at Imagination Playground

“It doesn’t seem like it, but everything connects with each one perfectly,” said Gabrielle Sunderland, 12, squinting happily toward the hot July sun. Around her were piles of weather- and germ-resistant foam blocks in sundry shapes and sizes. The blue pieces are the signature element of David Rockwell’s Imagination Playground, which opened Tuesday on Burling Slip near the South Street Seaport. A designer of theaters, high-end restaurants, and Broadway stage sets, Rockwell found his own children bored by the playgrounds of Lower Manhattan. So he set out to create a playspace where kids could use their own imagination, just as he once did. “Playgrounds are the places where kids can learn how to be a community and create their own worlds, but the ones we visited were all too linear,” he told AN at the opening. “That gave me the idea of a different kind of playground.” Gabrielle and her friend Ajda Celebi, 10, were industriously showing off Rockwell’s central strategy: providing kids with loose pieces that promote unstructured play. The girls set two rectangular blocks together with a noodle on the side and a ball on top, creating something like a giant teapot. They liked the fact that the playground allows them to make structures entirely “out of your own creativity,” as Ajda put it. The project got its start after Rockwell persuaded Parks Commissioner Adrian Benepe with a drawing on a lunch napkin, and then spent five years researching progressive learning theory and child development. He also helped round up funds for the $7.5 million project, which included a $4.5 million grant from the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation and $3 million from the New York City Department of Environmental Protection for the relocation of two water mains and a sewer line into the adjacent street. Rockwell also teamed with nonprofit playground designer KaBOOM! and together they developed Imagination Playground in smaller portable versions, tested and tweaked after trial tours in Washington, D.C., New Orleans, Miami, and New York. But the first permanent site for the concept is designed pro-bono on a former parking lot at Burling Slip. Comprised of a large multi-level deck in the shape of a swooping figure eight of reclaimed Indonesian teak, the new playground is essentially an empty space for the array of 350 props. Situated in a landmark district, the landscape does include some features that recall the surrounding area’s nautical past, including reused benches from Coney Island, barrels, and burlap bags. The west end is the sand pit, consisting of sloping wooden ramps and four wooden masts made by a shipbuilder, each connected by ropes and pulleys. In the center stands a crow’s nest atop a red, circular structure housing bathrooms and a storage space for the blocks. At the east end, a rounded amphitheater for storytelling overlooks an ankle-deep pool with pipes and canals that enable the control of cascading water. A staff of city workers trained as “play associates” oversees the action, as with all Imagination Playgrounds. According to Benepe, Burling Slip is the start of a new era of New York City playgrounds, where Rockwell’s sponges will replace worn-out monkey bars, swings, and jungle gyms. “The next step is to look at playgrounds that are underperforming and need renovation in central Brooklyn and the South Bronx, and apply the concept,” he told AN, adding that these might come with a different set of materials. “Here we had a flexible budget, but we could take a traditional Parks Department playground budget, and use these approaches.” For his part, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg described the project as a tremendous success. “It is always amazing to see what children choose to create when they are fully using their imagination,” he declared. As for the little pirates, they too gave the playspace top grade. “It’s all big and blue and bendy,” Gabrielle said, while balancing a cog on top of a cube tower. “It’s a lot of fun!” And Ajda added, “The new West Thames playground where I live is really cool, but this one is more fun, because you can do anything here.” With that, she eagerly returned to helping the other kids dam a cascading water flow in the pool area. To everyone’s joy, the jets of water created unexpected rainbows against the blue afternoon sky.
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Mess With the Imagination (Playground) of David Rockwell

For the past few years, David Rockwell, that master of stage and scene, has been developing the Imagination Playground, a deployable playground-in-a-box that has been finding its way across the country. Now, he is just finishing a larger playground, sort of a showcase for the concept, at Burling Slip in Lower Manhattan. (As the rendering after the jump shows, it's quite literally a flagship.) To celebrate the opening of the new playground at the end of July, the Parks Department is taking imagination playgrounds on a pop-up tour, which kicked off this past weekend in Staten Island, with stops in all five boroughs to follow. It truly is a revolutionary concept in recreation, though not the first, as we've chronicled. In the current issue of New York, Justin Davidson even gives us the best 19 in the city, yet another mind of the parks renaissance currently taking place in New York.
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You Like Him, You Really Like Him

David Rockwell's star turn at the Oscars last year won the designer considerable plaudits, so he's been asked to reprise his role, according to UPI. "We loved the look and feel that David created for the Oscar show last year," one of the producers said. "David is so creative and has such a great big-picture approach to set design," said another. The well-known interiors ace has done considerable amount of work on Broadway as well as the Kodak Theater where the Oscars are taped, so really, it's like a homecoming.
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Pratt Is Back

Pratt Institute was founded in 1886 by Charles Pratt, who had sold his family’s Astral Oil works to Standard Oil in 1874. It was Pratt’s original intention that the school train industrial workers for the changing economy of the 19th century, and this it did for many years before growing into one of the leading art and design schools in the country. Like any institution, the school has had its stellar moments and its sleepy periods. The art department has been a training ground for dozens of important American artists, and its architecture school once had faculty like Sibyl Moholy-Nagy and experimental designers like John Johansen, Michael Webb, and Raimund Abraham. Pratt even spawned this country’s most important community advocacy organization: the Pratt Center, founded by Ron Shiffman, a legend in the world of community planning. Having weathered a rough stretch 15 years ago, when it was nearly bankrupt, the institute has undergone a transformation under its current president, Thomas Schutte. He has built a sizable endowment, upgraded the campus buildings and grounds (including a Steven Holl­-designed school of architecture), strengthened its academic programs, and turned the institute into a design powerhouse with many of its programs rated in the top ten nationally. Typical of its notion of itself as a New York-centered institution, tonight it will honor Marc Jacobs, David Rockwell, and Patti Smith at a special scholarship benefit party. If you want to see how far the school’s industrial and product design departments have come, though, you can visit the new Rogers Marvel-designed townhouses at 115 Third Street in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn. Under the direction of Professor Anthony Caradonna, the institute has cleverly used both faculty- and student-designed furniture and household objects to furnish the residence, and has thrown in pieces by famed graduates including Eva Zeisel, Giovanni Pellone, Harry Allen, and William Katavolos.
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South Central Farm Documentary Up For an Oscar Tonight

As you're dazzled by light refracting off one million Swarovski crystals at a very Rockwellian Oscars this evening, there'll be one award worth watching besides the Mickey Rourke vs. Angelina Jolie faceoff for Biggest Lips. Up for best documentary feature is The Garden, the story of a 14-acre community garden in South Central that was the largest of its kind...until it was bulldozed in 2006 by developer Ralph Horowitz to make way for a Forever 21 warehouse. Since 2006 the plot has sat vacant while the 350 families locked out of their plots have mounted a massive campaign to combat the warehouse and boycott the retailer. Local residents have even accused project supporters City Councilwoman Jan Perry and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa of corruption; last year, the mayor recieved at least $1.3 million in donations from the fast-growing retailer and even took the company's founders on a trade mission to Asia in 2006. This weekend, protests at Forever 21's Pasadena location seemed like bittersweet promotion for the documentary, which is currently making the festival rounds. We'll be pulling for the film—and the displaced farmers—tonight. Update: The Garden didn't win, but that's okay with us because another architecturally-significant film, Man on Wire, about Philippe Petit's tightrope walk between the World Trade Center towers, did. After accepting the award, Petit balanced the Oscar on his chin.