Posts tagged with "David Chipperfield":

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$600 million Chipperfield expansion for Metropolitan Museum of Art put on hold

Slightly more than a year after British architect David Chipperfield was selected to redesign portions of New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, the project has been put on hold. Museum officials disclosed last month that they plan to temporarily suspend design work on the $600 million expansion project as part of an institution-wide effort to restructure finances and address a $10 million deficit. They said the restructuring would be a two year process and that a time frame for resuming design work on the expansion would depend on the pace of fundraising for it. The Chipperfield project will “be quiet for a while,” The New York Times quoted museum president Daniel Weiss as saying. “The pace of the project is slowing,” Weiss said, according to The Wall Street Journal. The Met’s disclosure came in the same week that Museum of Modern Art officials announced a $100 million gift from entertainment mogul David Geffen to help fund their expansion, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Three floors of the museum’s new galleries will be named The David Geffen Wing in recognition of the donation, museum officials said. In March of 2015, officials at the Met announced that the museum selected David Chipperfield Architects to design an expansion, which most likely would involve demolition of the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing in the museum’s southwest corner, to increase exhibition space for modern and contemporary art and to double the size of the Roof Garden above the Wallace Wing. At the time, Met officials indicated Chipperfield also might become involved in redesigning other areas of the museum, including “adjacent galleries devoted to the Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, as well as additional operational spaces.” In effect, he was being tapped to take on the design role at the museum that Kevin Roche had for many years. Demolition of the 110,000-square-foot Wallace wing, which Roche designed and which opened in 1987, would need approval from New York’s Landmarks Preservation Commission and others. In April of 2016, museum leaders disclosed that they plan a series of budget cuts and that the timing of the Chipperfield project would be affected. They said the schematic design phase has been completed and that they will wait to proceed with any more design work until money for the project has been raised. Other aspects of the restructuring include a reduction in staff through voluntary buyouts or layoffs or both, a hiring freeze, and scaling back some exhibition programming, as well as efforts to maximize revenues. The cutbacks follow a period of expansion for the Met, including the opening of the Met Breuer satellite museum inside the former home of the Whitney Museum on Madison Avenue, and a reported $3 million campaign to develop a new branding approach for the institution. Chipperfield’s previous museum projects include the Neues Museum in Berlin, Museo Jumex in Mexico City, the Saint Louis Art Museum and The Hepworth in Wakefield, England. Last month, Chipperfield’s design for a new Nobel Center in Stockholm received approval from the city council there. The Met has been drawing more than six million visitors a year, even before the Met Breuer opened. According to a 2014 report in The Art Newspaper, it ranks as one of the three busiest museums in the world in terms of attendance, after the Louvre and the British Museum.
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David Chipperfield’s Nobel Center given the go ahead

After winning commission for the project in 2014, David Chipperfield and partner Christoph Felger's Nobel Center (or Nobelhuset) has endured a turbulent journey. In September last year, Chipperfield had to curtail plans for the Center, located in Blasieholmen in the heart of Stockholm, after it had garnered fervent opposition. It was reported that thousands had signed a petition stating that the building's scale was inconsiderate given the historic site's sensitivity. Caroline Silfverstolpehe of the Preserve Blasieholmen network, lamented the building, described it as a “giant colossus—a de facto convention centre on the mediaeval quayside pillaging everything in its path.” Now, however, the project has finally been given the green light after the city council voted 54 to 43 in favor of the Chipperfield's altered design. The vote, which Lars Heikensten, executive director of the Nobel Foundation, described as a “resounding yes,” came after planning approval was awarded last month. Provided there are no further appeals lodged against the project, ground could break along the Blasieholmen waterfront by 2017. Construction is set to take up to two years being completed by 2019. The project when amended last year was due to open in 2018. Located on the Blasieholmen peninsula on the edge of the Klara Sjö canal, the Nobel Center will host ceremonies for the natural science, humanities, and peace effort Nobel prizes as well as acting as a civic meeting place. In doing so it will be the first building ever to be dedicated to the event. In a statement on the modified project, David Chipperfield Architects said in September that “the modified design integrates the nobel center even better in its urban context and establishes a lively interaction with the citizens and visitors of Stockholm.” When AN first covered the story, the competition jury commented: “The proposed building conveys dignity and has an identity that feels well balanced for the Nobel Center. The limited footprint of the building allows room for a valuable park facing the eastern portions of the site, with plenty of space for a waterfront promenade along the quay. The facade surfaces will also reflect light from the sky down into the street or open space on Hovslagargatan.” “I understand that it evokes much emotion—to build in the inner city is difficult. It is difficult for the simple reason that we love our city. But I think that this knowledge centre could be something we should be proud of,” said councillor Magnus Nilsson. “I am convinced that the building in itself and the activities that will take place there will be highly appreciated,” he added.
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Sou Fujimoto and David Chipperfield among others tasked with “Reinventing Paris”

As part of a master plan comprising 23 sites across ParisSou Fujimoto, David Chipperfield, and 20 others have been named as winners involved in responding the the Mayor's call to "reinvent Paris." https://twitter.com/Paris/status/694829444243046400?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw "A city like Paris must be able to reinvent itself at every moment in order to meet the many challenges facing it. Particularly in terms of housing and everything relating to density, desegregation, energy and resilience," said Anne Hidalgo, Mayor of Paris. "It is important in today's world to find new collective ways of working that will give shape to the future metropolis." The scheme was launched last year at the start of November, and has prompted many architects and developers to submit plans for the 23 sites across the city. Ranging from empty brownfield sites, polluted wastelands, classified mansions, office renovations, and train stations, Hidalgo's plan has been hailed by many with French publication Talerma going so far as to call it a "stroke of genius." Despite the number of changes, one of the 23 sites, an 1880 neo-Gothic former Korean Embassy-turned-mansion has been left neglected. The judges deemed that no proposal (barely any were submitted) was worthy of construction and so the ageing structure will be left untouched on the Avenue De Villiers. The same cannot be said for the Messana railway station, however. Given the unusual location and former typology, many were inspired to make it their own and judges were spoilt for choice. The winning submission came from Lina Ghotmeh DGT Architects who transformed the space into a healthy eating haven. Including a rooftop vegetable garden, a laboratory for agroecosystem research, gardening classrooms, residences for young chefs, bar, and, of course, restaurant. Other notable winning submissions came from British architect David Chipperfield and Sou Fujimoto from Japan. Working alongside Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson, Chipperfield will "reinvent" the Immeuble Morland, a 164-foot tall once state-owned building that lies on the river Seine. The mixed-use program will include a swimming pool, ground floor food market, gym, a hotel, offices, a creche, youth hostel, and set aside 53,800 square feet for social housing. The top floor will also offer panoramic bar and restaurant. Fujimoto, meanwhile, collaborated with revered French product designer Philippe Starck and Manal Rachdi of OXO Architectes. Fujimoto's project will stretch across the Boulevard Périphérique, by the Palais des Congrès de Paris and offer what appears to be a densely packed green roof. Like Chipperfield, Fujimoto dedicated a large portion of his project to social housing. In fact, this will assume 30 percent of the development that will also offer office space, a community center, kindergarten, and play area. The projects are set to cost over $1.46 billion and return $634 million in revenue to the city through the sale or long-term leasing of land. In addition to this, 2,000 over the course of three years are expected to be generated via construction alone.
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David Chipperfield chosen for 2016 Rolex Mentor and Protege Arts Initiative

Swiss watchmaker Rolex is looking out for new talent. The Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative pairs accomplished artists and designers across all disciplines with emerging practitioners for a yearlong, one-on-one mentorship. At an awards ceremony on Sunday in Mexico City, David Chipperfield was chosen as the mentor in architecture. The partnership with the as-yet-unchosen protege will begin mid-2016. A noted architect of cultural and civic institutions, Chipperfield designed Mexico City's Museo Júmex (completed 2013); the Nobel Center in Stockholm (set to open in 2018); the Royal Academy of Arts master plan (expected completion: 2018); and the Turner Contemporary Gallery in Margate, England. In September of this year, David Chipperfield Architects beat out KPF and Foster + Partners to convert the Eero Saarinen–designed United States Embassy in London into a hotel. For the Rolex initiative, panels of arts professionals all over the world convene to nominate new talent in their respective fields. Mentors choose from a list of three to four finalists. Winners will be announced in June of next year. The pair is asked to spend at least six weeks together, collaborating on projects. Past mentors in architecture include Peter Zumthor (2014–2015), Kazuyo Sejima (2012–2013), and Alvaro Siza (2002–2003). In addition to Chipperfield, this year the committee selected Mia Couto (literature), Alfonso Cuarón (film), Philip Glass (music), Joan Jonas (visual arts), Robert Lepage (theatre) and Ohad Naharin (dance).
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David Chipperfield’s Classical display cabinets take a cue from the Ionic column

Looking for a tasteful way to show off your collection of iconic postmodern teapots or architect-designed shoes? David Chipperfield may have the answer. Debuting during the London Design Festival, the "Ionic" display cases find the architect comfortably ordering classical bronze columns and ribbed glass panels. The cabinets have been developed for the David Gill Gallery. "David Gill encouraged me to think to create furniture outside of the normal commercial criteria—the furniture industry is interested in methods of production that are economical and where pieces sit within the marketplace—be that a sofa or a coffee table," Chipperfield said in a statement. "With David Gill, we were able to operate outside the conventional commercial furniture system. It was strange, and yet very interesting." The project evokes the fantasy of architects everywhere: the dream client, with little to no restrictions on vision and budget. "I still wanted to make a utilitarian object but didn't see utility as its primary concern—or the economy of means," Chipperfield continued. "I didn't have to worry about how it was made, just to make something beautiful out of beautiful materials, such as casting and bronze; things that normally lie beyond the possibilities of the commercial process and invest the object with a strong physical presence."
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David Chipperfield shrinks his design for Stockholm’s Nobel Center

David Chipperfield has curtailed plans for his design for Stockholm's Nobel Center (or Nobelhuset) just five months after winning a competition for the project back in April this year. In a statement on the modified project, David Chipperfield Architects said that "the modified design integrates the nobel center even better in its urban context and establishes a lively interaction with the citizens and visitors of Stockholm." When AN first covered the story, the jury comments from the competition were: "The proposed building conveys dignity and has an identity that feels well balanced for the Nobel Center. The limited footprint of the building allows room for a valuable park facing the eastern portions of the site, with plenty of space for a waterfront promenade along the quay. The facade surfaces will also reflect light from the sky down into the street or open space on Hovslagargatan." Sited on the Blasieholmen peninsula on the edge of the Klara Sjö canal, the Nobel Center will host ceremonies for the natural science, humanities, and peace effort Nobel prizes as well as acting as a civic meeting place. In doing so it will be the first building ever to be dedicated to the event. Despite a reduction in size, the idea behind the project remains intact. The building has become slightly more legible as now onlookers can gaze into all floors from the exterior, meanwhile the top floor responds to the surrounding typologies. Surrounded by slithers of opaque glass and metal pilaster strips, the facade according to the architects, "envelopes the building like a dress." This feature is meant to establish visual connection with the city and buildings surroundings. Other changes to the scheme include the implementation of a south terrace and a new plaza inspired by the nearby Blaisieholmstorg Square on the north side. The program includes an auditorium, a museum, conference facilities, educational spaces, and offices, as well as a restaurant, a bar, café, and shop. The focal point of the building is the auditorium which has also been developed during the alteration process, with the intention for it to be the future venue of the Nobel Prize Ceremony for Sciences, Literature, and Economic Sciences. The building is currently set to open in 2018.
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David Chipperfield beats Foster, KPF to convert US embassy in London to hotel

In London's high-end Mayfair neighborhood, the Brutalist United States embassy, originally designed by Eero Saarinen, has been keeping watch over Grosvenor Square for 55 years. Diplomats will soon be exiting the building, however, as developers prepare for a hotel conversion by David Chipperfield Architects. The Architects Journal reports that Chipperfield bested Foster+Partners and U.S. firm Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) for the job. However, there is some uncertainty as to whether Chipperfield has actually been commissioned or not. A spokesman for Qatari Diar, the company that now owns the site, refused to confirm that Chipperfield won the competition, stating: "A range of options on the best use of this important site are currently being considered." Qatari Diar Real Estate Investment has secured the remaining 939 years on the Mayfair district building’s lease and will not be allowed to alter the embassy's design as it was awarded grade 2 listing status for its historical and architectural significance and its "dynamic facade" in 2009. According to the Department of Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS), the concrete building was the "first purpose-built US embassy in Europe." The building's "dynamic facades, well-detailed stonework and consistency of detail and the innovative application of the exposed concrete diagrid" led to its protected status, the DCMS added. Occupying 225,000 square feet, the embassy takes up the entire west side of Grosvenor Square and currently has, according to Bloomberg, around 750 staff. Philadelphia-based KieranTimberlake has drawn up plans for the new U.S. embassy in Nine Elms, just south of the Thames, which is set to welcome occupants in 2017. The firm's winning design has been described by the Times as having a "moat" due to its semi-circular pond on one side. The new embassy resembles a crystalline cube and is surrounded by extensive public green spaces.
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Product> Home and Away: Residential and Commercial Furnishings

Thanks to the increasingly sophisticated tastes of clients and consumers, it’s becoming harder to discern a distinct boundary between residential and commercial furnishings. These tables, chairs, benches, and stools attest to the success of such stylistic crossovers. Los Andes Tables Bernhardt Design This collection of beautifully crafted tables takes inspiration from the lush landscapes and natural elements of the Andes Mountain Range. Nature and modern design take shape in the solid walnut Los Andes collection, with the raised rim mimicking the peaks and plateaus of the rugged mountains in Chile. Designed by Ignacia Murtagh. Okura Ligne Roset This curvy, cushiony settee could anchor a cocktail lounge or a living room with equal aplomb. The collection includes a footrest, armchair, and medium and large settees, available with a high or low backrest. The base is offered in chromed or lacquered steel. Designed by Eric Jourdan. Polygon Tables Herman Miller In their expression of pure geometry, the Polygon Table series provides an elegant solution to the need for all manner of surfaces, at home, the office, and elsewhere. The structure of the table’s wire base yields a dual advantage: a symmetry of form that uses minimal material for maximum strength and a logical method for scaling up or down in size and height to accommodate various dimensions of round, triangle, and hexagon tops of painted Formcoat. By unifying the color of base and top—in a choice of black, white, or gray/graphite—a single table has a subtle appearance, and a gathering of tables, nested or stacked, create an organic composition. Each shape is available in three sizes and heights. Designed by Studio 7.5. Roi, Mat, Fou Avenue Road The three stools, each subtly different, feature a French walnut varnished base and a leather seat. Designed by Christophe Delcourt. Press Room Chair Suite NY In 1958, the Dutch government commissioned famed architect and designer Gerrit Rietveld to design a chair for the press room of the new UNESCO building in Paris. Rietveld was part of an elite group of designers who had been tapped to collaborate on the new building, including Hans J. Wegner, Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius, and Marcel Breuer. Rietveld's chair was meant as a comfortable lounge chair for the low reading table for journalists. However, due to budget limitations, Rietveld's new chair was never produced—but the original design drawings and scale models were preserved, and the chair has been launched for the first time in 2015 exactly as Rietveld had envisioned it. On the underside of each chair is a poem by Christian Morgenstern entitled "The Aesthete," one that Rietveld sometimes printed underneath his designs, reflecting his opinion that a chair was not meant to rest, so it didn't need the comfort of a bed. With solid oak or walnut armrests. Available in 18 fabric options and 9 leather options. Designed by Gerrit Reitveld. Fawley Bench e15 This new product family consisting of a solid wood table, bench, and stool emphasizes the pure use of material and a clear design language. In addition to European walnut and solid oak in oiled or white pigmented finishes, the collection is also offered in black, highlighting the elegant silhouette. Designed by David Chipperfield.
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After a year-long search, the Met chooses David Chipperfield to design the museum’s new wing

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced that David Chipperfield has been selected to "develop a new design for the Southwest Wing for modern and contemporary art, and potentially for adjacent galleries for the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, as well as additional operational spaces." In a statement, Thomas P. Campbell, the director and CEO of The Met, said Chipperfield's firm was selected after a year-long process because of its global experience and sense of collaboration. Campbell also noted the firm's extensive museum work, calling it "brilliantly coherent, elegant, and accessible." Chipperfield's team is now tasked with increasing gallery space, enhancing visitor circulation, doubling the Roof Garden, and creating accessible on-site storage. “We are delighted to have been selected for this extraordinary commission," David Chipperfield said in a statement. "During the competition we developed an understanding and fondness for this amazing institution and we look forward to working with Tom Campbell and his colleagues on the development of the design.” While the design process is just beginning, the Met said the renovation will support "a more open dialogue between the Museum and Central Park." The potential impact of this renovation on the park itself could be the most controversial aspect of this project and will surely be closely watched. While construction is underway, the Met's collection will be temporarily moved to the Breuer Building, the former home of the Whitney, which is moving into a new Renzo Piano–designed space near the High Line. The old Whitney building will open to the public next spring as a satellite campus of the Met.
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David Chipperfield designs a luxe showroom in Milan for Italian furniture brand Driade

In a rising-from-the-ashes revival, prominent Italian furniture brand Driade will debut a new showroom in Milan under the creative direction of British architect David Chipperfield, the company’s newly appointed artistic director. The opening of the three-story, 5,381-square-foot space marks an existential do-over for the firm, which folded in 2012 with debts of over €1.7 million (nearly US$2 million). At the time, the Italian design industry was notorious for chewing up and spitting out small, family-owned companies like Driade that invested disproportionately in product innovation and lacked the capital to expand or compete in the global market. Having cut a €7 million (nearly US$8 million) investment deal with Italian Creation Group in exchange for 80 percent equity, Driade is set to reboot with a showroom that declares its brand identity—from its iconic pieces to the latest designs. Recalling the brand’s infant years between 1968 and 1982, the first exhibition hallmarks the early vision of founders Enrico Astori, Antonia Astori, and Adelaide Acerbi. Celebrated designs from that period include Tokuyin Yoshioka’s monobloc Tokyo-Pop collection and Philippe Starck’s three-legged Costes cafe chair, which inspired an onslaught of clones and the movement of ordinarily mass-produced necessities like kitchenware, pasta and mineral water becoming designer duds. Partnering with top Italian and eventually world-renowned designers such as Patricia Urquiola and Oscar Tusquets, Driade was conceived with a vision to reconcile experimentation with mass production. Located in Via Borgogna 8, Milan, the showroom moonlights as a shop and a gallery showcasing objects and furnishings curated by Marco Romanelli.
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David Chipperfield short-listed for Beethoven Concert Hall in Germany

Some of the biggest names in architecture have been whittled out of a competition to design a new Beethoven Concert Hall—or Beethoven Festspielhaus—in the composer’s hometown of Bonn, Germany. When the competition's short list of ten proposals became an even-shorter list of three, the likes of Zaha Hadid, SnøhettaJAHN and UNStudio were sent packing. David Chipperfield, however, made it through and is joined in the final three by Valentiny hvp architects from Luxembourg and Kadawittfeldarchitektur from Germany. The new hall, which is slated to break ground in 2016, is expected to host celebrations for Beethoven’s 250th birthday in 2020, and the 200th anniversary of his death in 2027. Out of the three finalists, Chipperfield definitely presents the most conservative scheme with four stacked cubes made of glass and spun concrete columns. “Assembled at various depths, the four segments combine to create a whole of architectural virtuosity,” explained the competition on its website. The actual concert hall is wrapped in a grained walnut veneer that can be seen through the structure’s façade. Kadawittfeldarchitektur takes a more dramatic approach with an amorphous structure clad in rippling bands of stone. The main structure is separated from a landscaped seating area through a glass enclosure. Oddly enough, the plan from Valentiny hvp architects looks more like “Zaha” than what the Queen of Swoop submitted herself. The firm creates a series of "overlapping bands of waves" that are said to crest behind a massive, Rhine River–facing glass wall. You can see Zaha's proposal and the nine others that were short-listed on the competition's website. One of these three final proposals is expected to be selected next year, following a cost estimation. The project is being privately financed, but is getting an injection of 39 million euros from the German government. The concert hall is expected to open in 2019. [h/t DesignBoom]
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French Artist Turns Iconic Architecture into Quirky Animated GIF’s

The French “GIF artist”—welcome to the 21st century, everybody—Axel de Stampa has officially made time-lapse videos look like child’s play. In his new project, Animated Architecture, de Stampa spins, shifts, tops, and deconstructs some of the most visually distinctive contemporary buildings—all in endlessly entertaining GIF format. "In Architecture Animée, Axel de Stampa uses GIF format to develop a different approach. While the visitor doesn’t move, the building offers different perceptions, comes alive and reveals additional evidence," explained the artist in a statement. [h/t ArchDaily]