Posts tagged with "Curtis + Ginsberg Archtiects":

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Major affordable housing developments coming to East Harlem and the Bronx

New York City is set to get hundreds of new units of affordable housing in the Bronx and Manhattan. On Tuesday, Mayor Bill de Blasio's office welcomed news that the City Council had approved four developments in the Bronx and East Harlem. Lawmakers had previously rejected rezonings that would've allowed affordable developments in Sunnyside, Cobble Hill, and Inwood, three major blows to the mayor's plan to build or preserve 200,000 units for low- and middle-income households over the next decade. In the Bronx, the biggest project is the redevelopment of the Lambert Houses, a $600 million initiative that will bring two elementary schools, a renovation of a local park, and $12.3 million in transit infrastructure improvements to the West Farms neighborhood. All units at the other Bronx developments, Morrisania's Melrose Commons and West Farms's Second Farms, will be completely rent-regulated. At East Harlem's Lexington Gardens, 20 percent of the units will be let for more than median rents, Politico reports. The complex, designed by Curtis + Ginsberg Architects and developed by L+M Development Partners and Tahl Propp Equities' Lexington Gardens, is a 400-unit development bounded by Park Avenue, East 108th Street, and East 107th Street. Retail, parking, and space for nonprofits will occupy a 15-story, 411,725-square-foot structure. The building is zoned for Mandatory Inclusionary Housing (MIH), which ensures that units will remain permanently affordable. 20 percent of the Lexington Gardens apartments will be available to households making one-third of the area median income (AMI), which is $24,480 for a family of three, while an additional 30 percent will be offered to those making half of the AMI, or $40,800 for a three-person household. The full-block development portends residential construction elsewhere in the neighborhood: The pending East Harlem rezoning could bring 3,500 units to the area in the coming years.  
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Who Designed These Buildings?

On Friday, the prolific New York Times metro reporter Jennifer 8. Lee, whose beat seems to include everything from fortune cookies to urban planning, covered a new mixed supportive and moderate-income housing development in Harlem, co-developed by the Fortune Society. Unfortunately for the architects involved, she misattributed the design of the project, and of another recent affordable housing development in Harlem, David and Joyce Dinkins Gardens, to the other co-developer, Jonathan Rose Companies.
courtesy Curtis + Ginsberg Architects
Designed by Curtis + Ginsberg Architects, the 114-unit, 110,000 square foot Fortune Society project includes housing for former inmates as well as moderate-income apartments. The eleven story building, which is designed to meet LEED Gold Standards, features a terraced green roof system, a portion of which is accessible, rainwater harvesting, sustainable buildings materials, and sun louvers over the windows, among other green design elements. “It has wonderful views of the Hudson,” said Roberta Darby Curtis, principal at Curtis + Ginsberg. “For people who have been incarcerated, having access to the outdoors is that much more important,” Mark Ginsberg, the other principal, told AN.
courtesy Dattner Architects
Dinkins Gardens, completed last year, was designed by Dattner Architects, and was also co-developed by Rose. It also includes affordable housing and is topped with green roof. Though the mistake was surely unintentional, the developers, and the architects, behind these projects deserve credit for these cost effective, environmentally and socially responsive projects.