Posts tagged with "Cosentino":

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Product>Don’t Forget to Gloss

New developments in technology and updates to customizable options for façade products are allowing for countless ways to make an outstanding first impression. Dekton XGLOSS Cosentino

The XGLOSS series is an incredibly resilient high-gloss surface that is suitable for both interior and facade treatments. Nanotechnology lends Dekton’s new colors their luxuriously shiny finish. The five new color options are available in large format slabs in three different thickness options.

  Translucent Color Portfolio 3Form

3form has expanded its range of translucent color panels to offer 250 options that can be layered with different colors and textures to allow for infinite combinations. The colors can be applied to any of five material options including resin, polycarbonate, glass, recycled acrylic, and recycled resin.

Krion Porcelanosa

This exterior wall cladding system is particularly useful against adverse weather conditions, and the development of advanced fixing systems allows Krion to be used in ventilated facades. In addition, it can be thermoformed to create different curves, shapes, or textures. Krion is 100 percent recyclable, and made of an ecological material that is available in a wide range of colors.


UltraClear Guardian

UltraClear glass offers maximum clarity and color neutrality, making it virtually invisible. Without the green tint of standard glass, UltraClear allows for picture-perfect views. It can be combined with low-e coatings, and is fabricated, laminated, and heat-treated like standard glass.

Trosifol Kuraray

The Diamond White PVB interlayer is a single-layer film that offers the safety of a laminated construction as well as a uniform opaqueness and highly reflective surface. The optical properties are better than that of coated or fritted glass, because the glass does not need to be tempered, which results in less optical distortion.

3Seal JE Berkowitz

Composed of a warm edge spacer, primary PIB seal, and two-part silicone secondary seal, 3Seal is robotically applied to ensure an extremely straight sightline, improve thermal performance, increase condensation resistance, promote sound attenuation, and maximize heat-flow resistance.

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Daniel Libeskind on Acoustics, his Unexpected Architectural Process, and his Latest Venture One Day in Life

Little known fact: As a child, Daniel Libeskind was an accordion virtuoso. Until he was about 18, Libeskind toured the world playing concerts on his accordion and busting out works like Flight of the Bumblebee before he was in high school. “I think I probably made more money per hour than I do now,” he joked last night in Cosentino’s showroom where he revealed his latest venture: A 24-hour musical experience with over 75 consecutive concert events in Frankfurt May 21–22. The event, One Day in Life, was meant to capture what Libeskind defined as the “18 dimensions of existence,” such as body, will, memory, gravity, secret, work, and waiting. These “dimensions of existence” correspond with 18 different venues throughout Frankfurt, including Alte Oper, whose artistic and managing director, Dr. Stephan Pauly, coordinated the event with Libeskind. Other venues include a bunker, the Hospital zum heiligen Geist, the Commerzbank Arena, VGF Betriebshofand rail yard depot, a boxing gym, a pool, and a moving streetcar. Libeskind also selected the performers and ensembles to play the music, which includes a mix of classical and modern pieces. The music is meant to evoke its venue’s assigned dimension, for example, French composer Marin Marais’s Tableau de l’Opération de la Taille will be performed at the hospital. In a trifecta of Libeskind’s artistic talents, he created a drawing of the intersection of music, architecture, and the city entitled Musical Labyrinth. The drawing corresponds with the locations of One Day in Life and will be etched in white on a large, inky black platform of Cosentino Dekton tile in front of the Alte Oper Concert Hall. After the unveiling of One Day in Life AN’s managing editor Olivia Martin sat down with Libeskind to discuss how music, art, and architecture can work in concert. The Architect’s Newspaper: Has music always played this prominent role in your art and architecture? Libeskind: Drawing is like writing, like making music, like architecture. It’s an art that has to do with the mind, the hand, and your heart. That’s the connection in music and architecture. Did picking these locations and working out the music to be played in them inspire you to build anything in the future? It made me think about concert halls—there are not enough new concert halls and when they are built, it is not in a 21st-century way. They are more like the Viennese concert hall, more nostalgia about old acoustics, I think we need contemporary 21st-century ways for people to form a community around music, I thought of that a lot. I built not long ago the Grand Canal Theatre in Dublin and I especially took care with acoustics. I thought, what if I were up on stage? What does it look like? What does it feel like for someone performing? Do you always take an acoustic-centric approach to your buildings? I think of acoustics first. I think we are too addicted to the visual world today. It is a great medium to promote visual work but the inner ear when you listen and your orientation is more prominent than seeing. I also directed an opera, Saint François d'Assise by Messiaen. At first they asked me to do everything, including conducting, but then I looked at the score and it would take a year just to do the score—I’d have to give up architecture. So I said no, I cannot conduct, but I did everything else. I did the direction, the costumes, the stage, the lighting, everything except conducting. I’ve also done a lot of set design for opera, but I am an architect, I don't have time for stage design. So would you say you’ve picked architecture over music? No, I believe architecture is an extension of music. For me music is not a metaphor, it’s not the analysis of notes. It’s not an applique of music to architecture. It is a condensation of emotional intelligence and the sense of orientation in the ear and that is what connects it to the field. We should analyze our cities acoustically. How beautiful would it be to not only decorate our city with green but also think about the sound of New York? Every city has its own sound and it would lead to greater joy if people thought about the sound of their cities and the spectrum between silence and noise… and maybe it would give us more perspective than the simulation on our devices.  
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DXU Delivers Luxe Minimalism in Dekton

Sleek black rain screen reflects Porsche Design's understated style.

In the world of high-end retail, first impressions matter. Knowing this, DXU, LLC principal Eric Styer took special care selecting a facade material for the Porsche Design boutique in Oak Brook, Illinois. "We were trying to play off Porsche Design's simplicity and clean lines," said Styer, referring to the clothing and leather goods retailer's minimalist style. "Of course, this location is in a mall, so we had to deal with [their requirements] as well." After first eliminating other options on budgetary, performance, or aesthetic grounds, the architect found himself drawn to Dekton, an ultra-compact surfacing material from Cosentino. Styer's solution, a matte black Dekton rain screen featuring mitered joint detailing and integrated acrylic signage, plays up the material's strengths to embody Porsche Design's understated glamour. "We were looking for materials that would meet Porsche Design's design qualities as well as the mall's," recalled Styer. "They were pushing us to get granite on the exterior. However, that potentially leans in a direction we didn't want to follow." Specifically, Styer worried that the marbling on granite or another natural stone would distract from the overall impression he hoped to convey—of a solid block carved into masses and voids. In search of a similarly durable material, he reached out to Cosentino. The company mentioned Dekton, which was just being introduced to the United States, and suggested that the Porsche Design presented a unique opportunity to explore the material's use in a new application (as a facade). Styer was soon convinced that the material, composed of naturally existing inorganic minerals subjected to a patented high-heat, high-pressure process, would help him realize his technical and aesthetic ambitions.
  • Facade Manufacturer Stone Systems, Cosentino (advisors)
  • Architects DXU, LLC
  • Facade Installer Ryan Construction
  • Location Oak Brook, IL
  • Date of Completion August 2014
  • System Ventilated Dekton rain screen with mitered corners, integrated acrylic signage
  • Products Dekton by Cosentino in Sirius
Styer, who half-jokingly referred to Dekton as "basically surfacing on steroids," selected the material for three principal reasons. The first was its technical compatibility with his design. Dekton is manufactured in 5-foot by 10-foot slabs, thus reducing the occurrence of joints or seams. In addition, it can be miter-cut to mimic the appearance of cut stone. "That went back to the very simplistic, minimalistic impression we were looking for," explained Styer. "For all of our fenestrations in the building we have three-inch returns tucked behind the storefront volumes; that aspect of the material was perfect for Porsche Design." Durability was another important factor in the architect's decision to go with Dekton. The Oak Brook Porsche Design store is located on a high-traffic corner in a popular mall, making it especially vulnerable to wear and tear. Given Chicago's freeze-thaw cycle, Dekton's resistance to thermal shock was also a plus. As well as being technically appropriate and rugged, Dekton appealed to Styer on aesthetic grounds. Elegant but not showy, it captures the Porsche Design brand's emphasis on quality over bling. And though the material was available in only a limited number of colors and finishes at the time (Cosentino's offerings have since expanded to 23 colors), one of those combinations—the matte black Sirius—echoed the interior painting scheme. "In the interior, Porsche Design uses black glass, so if a high gloss black was available, we would have chosen that," said Styer. "But they also use matte black paint, so [Sirius] was perfect for us." The Dekton panels were installed as a ventilated rain screen. "There were some complications, maybe something of a learning curve in the fabrication process," recalled Styer. "A lot of that was due to the newness of the product in the States." None of the components that had been used to install Dekton rain screens in the United Kingdom were yet available on the other side of the pond, he explained, so "the Cosentino team had to jump through some hoops to get them here." The extra effort was worth it, however, as the particularities of the Dekton rain screen helped mitigate the difficulty of dealing with a preexisting structural rhythm. "For it being a pretty hard material, it was flexible in terms of some of the parameters we were looking for," said Styer. "There were piers we couldn't change, and a parapet element we had to tuck back into. To us, it seemed like a magic material." Styer is understandably pleased with where his hunt for an appropriate facade material led him—so much so that he looks forward to further experiments with Dekton. He mentioned in particular the capacity for bookmatching, and imagines a facade distinguished by a mirrored pattern. "It seems like you'd have more of an opportunity to do that with Dekton than with traditional stone," mused Styer. "It's a new aesthetic area I would like to investigate."
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Product> Data for Designers: Six Amazing Apps

Communicating information—both the visual and verbal varieties—in an accurate, timely fashion comprises the heart of any construction project. There are myriad programs and apps on the market that offer to streamline design problems, decision making, and materials selection. Here are some new tech tools that we think really make a difference. Autodesk A360 Collaboration for Revit Autodesk Overcoming the barriers of corporate firewalls and physical location, A360 Collaboration for Revit enables true centralized access to Revit models by team members in all disciplines from multiple firms or sites. It also replaces work-arounds for sharing models such as use of FTP sites, sharing software, or inefficient use of email with PDF attachments. As a cloud-based service, the software does not require costly or complex IT setup and maintenance. ViraconGlass Viracon This app allows users to select from twenty-five different coatings on fifteen substrates, presenting transmitted and reflective glass color on a variety of building types. The models can then be viewed under different lighting conditions from both interior and exterior perspectives, and can be compared to one another. Field Assets InfraWorks 360, Autodesk With this program, owners and operators will be able to collect, mark-up, and share date on infrastructure assets in real-time so teams can make better-informed decisions on how to deploy their field workforce for asset inspection and maintenance, key to optimal productivity and financial performance. SIMplexity Launch LT Introspective Systems This software enables architects to uncover and prioritize the underlying goals of each project, and create a road map from inception to completion. It captures data associated with a project in any format (email, video, images, databases, spreadsheets, PDFs, and more) and connects each piece of information to its role within a job—owner request, regulation, LEED target, or any user-created category—to produce a 360-degree view of the project. HD Home Viewer Cosentino This design tool allows users to change the materials by clicking on virtual countertops, facades, wall coverings, floors, furniture, and bathroom elements to visualize surface clad in the entire range of colors and finishes of Silestone quartz, Dekton ultra-compact material, and recycled Eco. HD Home Viewer is based on HTML5, permitting use on all portable and desktop devices running Android, iOS, and Windows. ColorSnap Studio Sherwin-Williams This iPad app makes it easy to find the closet-matching paint colors within an image and to fine-tune colors using lightness, saturation, and hue features. The Color Visuallizer toole facilitates experimenting with thousands of color combinations by applying color to an image without complicated edge-masking: Simply touch the color and "fingerpaint" the hue into the image.
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Product> Surface Effective: Eight Innovative Cladding Materials & Systems

From enhancing aesthetics with digitally-printed ceramic panels to increasing build-speed via all-in-one insulated metal panel systems, these innovative building products offer specialized facade solutions to architects. ClearShade Insulated Glass Panel Panelite A glazing solution that optimizes both daylight and solar heat control, its honeycomb insert is offered in a range of colors and patterns; customization is available. Dekton Cosentino Available in sheets up to 126 by 56 inches and thicknesses of 8, 12, and 20 millimeters, this ultra-compacted material has a high compressive strength, is non-porous, and UV resistant. In ten colors and textures. Dot-to-Dot Tagina The system is based on three-dimensional ceramic modules that function as pixels when mounted to an exterior facade. Consulting with the manufacturer, designers can create their own limited edition glazed porcelain tiles for ventilated facades or other architectural coverings. Benchmark Kingspan A single package system that combines the energy efficiency of IMPs with a proprietary carrier panel system that accommodates many cladding options, including aluminum composite material, metal composite material, ceramic granite, thin brick, plate, high pressure laminate, and ceramic tile. Renewall Lamboo Laminated bamboo elements are up to 20 percent more stable than hardwoods, while milling, sanding, and finishing using conventional machinery. Its naturally occurring silica content resists insects and fungal agents. LEED eligible. Hashtag Cambridge Architectural In panels up to 96 inches wide, the flattened surface area of this rigid stainless steel mesh boosts reflectivity. Produced from 100 percent recycled materials, it is LEED eligible. Lea Lab Lea Ceramiche Architects can create their own custom cladding imagery on ultra-thin, oversized ceramic panels using the Lea Lab digital printing technology. Upload high-resolution files, specify the panel size, and the manufacturing process is initiated. Baltic GKD Metal Fabrics With a range of visible light transmittance from .28 to .42 and a solar gain coefficient of between .20 and .29, this metal fabric makes an effective sunshade.
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Q+A> Daniel Libeskind on Cosentino’s Dekton, Architecture, and Music

At Cosentino’s launch of Dekton, AN had an opportunity to sit down with Daniel Libeskind. The world-renowned architect designed an outdoor sculpture, Off the Wall, made from the new material that weathers like stone but has manufactured advantages of specialized color, texture, and form, thanks to Cosentino’s particle sintering technology (PST) that simulates metamorphic rock formation at a highly accelerated rate. It originally debuted this spring at Salone del Mobile in Milan. AN: You studied music in Israel. Do you find any of your classical music training to inform your design and architecture work? Daniel Libeskind: Totally. Even though I was a virtuoso performer I continue to use that sense of my relationship to music very deeply in my work. Architecture and music are closely related in many ways. They’re both very precise: In music, even a vibration cannot be off by a single half note. And it’s the same with architecture; the geometry, the spatial character of a building must be accurate. And in the end, they’re very similar in the sense that despite their scientific basis and precision, they have to register emotionally. In other words, we don’t think about the music, or an atmosphere that affects us spiritually. From the way a score is written and has to be performed by an orchestra, an architect doesn’t build his building. Sometimes he is not apparently there; the architect is more like a conductor of a concerto. It’s full of closeness for me. To continue the musical analogy, would you say the style of your work is more traditional and evenly phrased like Mozart, or neoclassically experimental like Stravinsky? Music to me is not really in categories of classical or rap or rock or medieval or Gregorian. Really, it’s a universal language of rhythm, sound, and tempo. I would say each of my projects has its own musical quality. Acoustics themselves are so important in my work. In the Jewish Museum in Berlin, I designed an entire void for the acoustics. And let’s not also forget that our sense of balance isn’t in our eye but in our inner ear. All of these things converge on my set of interests. What are your impressions of the acoustic and/or technical qualities of Dekton? I think Dekton is a great material. First, it’s not just reusing old materials. It brings qualities of porcelain, glass, and quartz together through a new technique of creating the material. Which I think has a lot of incredible characteristics, both acoustical, visual, and also tactile. The sculpture you designed in Dekton for Cosentino has a spiral quality with intersecting corners that suggest an indoor/outdoor application. It’s a spiral, that organically grows but also uses the tectonic means of planes to ascend through movement toward light. Each face has a different quality of light and movement because of where it’s placed, so it is a sculpture but its also an architectural microcosm that suggests an ability to create spaces that are really fluid and very tectonic. Beyond-the-Wall-Dekton-Cosentino-archpaper Any ideal applications for Dekton, not just for your practice but for architects in general? I think in large-scale walls—because, you know, architecture contains walls—to create a beautiful sense of light and resilience with the material. It has great technical qualities—rigidity and imperviousness to water—and also aesthetically in terms of color, texture, and materiality. And for exteriors, because I’m working on buildings in mega scales, I think it’s a very good material because if you think of other cladding materials, you can’t really compete with this technical ability. The interior/exterior possibilities are also exceptional. Most of my buildings have a sculptural form. They’re never just a box; they’re spatial forms that most often have never been seen before. In that sense, the question of inside/outside is very important because in my work there’s no division like a cube where its very clear. Those buildings, like that spiral I’ve created for Cosentino, are both inside and outside simultaneously. It can be used in floors that merge into walls that merge into soffits and Dekton can achieve that seamlessly in large scales. Do you foresee Dekton playing a role in any of your future projects? Oh definitely. We’re working on a number of large-scale building projects around the world and I’m determined to use it because I love the material. For example we have a very large project in Sao Paolo that hasn’t been made public yet. We also have some creative opportunities in China and Singapore. Back to music, do you have a favorite band or album you’re currently listening to? I’m from the era of CDs—not records!—but not yet MP3s. On my table lays music that spans millennia: ancient Greece, the latest rap recordings, Helmut Lachenmann, one of the great composers from Germany. Music is always fantastic. A model of Libeskind's Off the Wall is on view at the Center for Architecture in New York, as part of the Surface Innovation exhibition that runs through the end of October.
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Blurred Lines: SOFTlab and Cosentino

A new exhibition helps a New York-based firm explore indoor and outdoor applications of a new building material.

Cosentino is celebrating Architecture Month with Surface Innovation, a multi-media exhibition at the Center for Architecture in New York that presents innovative applications of its new Dekton material. A combination of raw, inorganic materials found in glass, porcelain, and natural quartz, the new indoor/outdoor surfacing material is made with particle sintering technology (PST) that recreates the natural process of stone formation. The company invited six local architecture firms to design unique projects featuring the material, including SOFTlab, a design/build firm known for its mix of research, craft, and technology in large-scale installations and building projects. For SOFTlab, working with a product that could be used for both interiors and exterior applications was an opportunity to reconcile the growing inverse relationship between the skin and volume of large buildings. “We came up with the idea of building something a little more dense than a single story or residentially scaled building, where Dekton may be used,” said Michael Svivos, founder and director of SOFTlab. “We went to a larger scale building, that blurs the inside and outside.”
  • Fabricator SOFTlab
  • Designers SOFTlab
  • Location New York
  • Date of Completion October 2013
  • Material paper, adhesive
  • Process Maya, Rhino, Grasshopper, laser cutting
Starting with the idea of a vertical atrium, which often includes biophilic elements like water features and indoor gardens, the SOFTlab design team envisioned an ATRIUn, a uniquely shaped building feature that uses the durability of Dekton’s stone-like properties to bring the outdoors in. ATRIUn is sponge shaped, and breaches the structure’s exterior at various points. “It forms an interior plaza in a building, not as something that’s flat, but spans the height, width, and depth of the building,” Szivos said. The form was generated in Maya. After inserting the apertures along the quadrilinear volume, the physics simulation plug-in generated the smooth, sinuous surface across various levels. For its larger projects, Szivos says the firm typically solves engineering challenges with Arup through an advanced finite software analysis software program. Those optimized, large designs are then sent to Tietz-Baccon, their long-time local fabricator. However for smaller projects where SOFTlab fabricates its own models and project components, the physics tool provides a close approximation of Arup’s services. To generate a model of ATRIUn’s design for the exhibition, the designers translated the Maya drawing into Rhino with Grasshopper to feed to their in-house laser cutter. Since the design was modeled in paper, four sided shapes were fabricated. If the design was realized in Dekton, triangular shapes would be necessary to achieve the complex curvature of the ATRIUn skin. The set volume was 24 by 24 by 36 inches, scalable for a building between 10 and 12 stories. ATRIUn and Surface Innovation is on view at the Center for Architecture in New York through October 31.