Posts tagged with "conference":

Advancing Construction Claims 2018 Conference Atlanta, GA

Are You Ready for Your Next Complex Claim? In an increasingly digital and complex industry, Advancing Construction Claims 2018 is a contractor-led meeting where you will learn to mitigate and manage a wide variety of disputes. Preparing your organization is critical, from ensuring you have robust insurance coverage to retaining crucial electronic documents. Trends in contract language and design delegation add further complexity to claims management. Best practices continue to be updated on how to manage delay, defect and other frequent claim types. At this meeting you'll hear how contractors and their partners are dealing with all of the above from reducing risk and dealing early with disputes, all the way through to the management of mediation and arbitration. If your job for 2018 is to mitigate and manage construction claims, then this is the event for you!
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A preview of ACADIA 2017, where disciplinary boundaries are blurred

On November 2-4, ACADIA will host its annual conference at MIT. Ahead of the proceedings, The Architect’s Newspaper (AN) spoke with one of this year’s organizers, Skylar Tibbits, Assistant Professor of Design Research in MIT's Department of Architecture and director of the Self-Assembly Lab—to get a preview of what to expect from this year’s impressive lineup. AN: The theme of this year’s conference is Disciplines & Disruption. What are the prime disruptors you’ve identified and what types of research are you expecting to see? ST: If you asked this question in previous years, everyone’s attention was on robots. We had a robotics arms race for a moment and robotics has spun off into its own architectural conferences. The submissions this year are more about AI and Machine Learning, Visualization like AR/VR, and advances in HCI demonstrating the wealth and breadth of tools now available and the velocity of technological change. AN: The most disruptive thing is really the acceleration of technological change, is it not? ST: It’s a given that people participate in ACADIA for the latest and greatest research in technology for the architectural field and yet we are struck also by the context. Disruption isn’t about just rapid change in markets but about people, their contexts, and concerns and the feeling of cultural and technological shifts happening concurrently. AN: Can you speak more to these shifts and how you define disciplines in increasingly co-located and overlapping fields of research? ST: Disciplinary shifts look like convergence and hybridization. Boundaries between disciplines shrink and we ask what are the limits of the discipline today. Is ACADIA a Materials Science conference or a Computer Science Conference? Of course, the work comes out of architecture practice, but we need to ask those disciplinary questions in a bigger way. When everyone is a hybrid, you can get quite existential about what you are doing. We have a great line-up of keynotes from Neri Oxman and Thomas Heatherwick to Nervous Systems and Ben Fry that I think embody these hybrid practices. AN: What has changed in the course of ACADIA’s history? ACADIA started back when CAD was a novel idea and now every architecture student uses tools in really advanced ways. The technologies are now so ubiquitous and yet there is always room for innovation. The pressing questions become about testing the limits of the disciplines and how we can understand and elevate the social/cultural/political impacts while we innovate. AN: What makes hosting the conference at MIT special? The organizers and myself wanted to bring the MIT ethos to ACADIA. I want attendees to come away with a sense of the real MIT, not just that we are tight-knit group of techies, but that there are people here looking seriously at the big picture and developing hybrid research practices. ACADIA kicks off this weekend with a Hackathon at MIT Media Lab followed by three days of workshops at the newly opened Autodesk BUILD Sspace. The conference is happening at MIT November 2-4. Visit 2017.acadia.org
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Product> Sustainable and Green Products from Greenbuild 2015

The 14th annual Greenbuild International Conference and Expo took place November 18–20 in Washington, D.C. This year’s expo featured the latest and greatest products and materials in sustainable design. Check out these cutting-edge green building products from the show. SageGlass Electrochromic Glass SageGlass Control interior sunlight and glare without affecting scenic views with SageGlass Electrochromic Glass. Equipped with electronic tinting and clearing capabilities, this dynamic glass is suitable for windows, skylights, and curtain walls. The glass also helps reduce energy consumption and building cooling loads. Deep Dive Kirei Kirei teamed up with Maine Heritage Timber to create Deep Dive, a collection of reclaimed timber that can be used for wallcoverings, ceilings, and millwork. Deep Dive is available in two specifications: Heritage Plank and Shadow Wood. The ½-inch-thick Heritage Plank comes in three widths, lengths that range from 1 to 4 inches, and both prefinished and unfinished options. Featuring a mix of thicknesses, Shadow Wood is available in three widths and lengths. TGI-Spacer M Technoform This durable and lightweight window spacer works hard to reduce unwanted drafts and condensation on the interior surface of window glass. TGI–Spacer M comes in a wide variety of size configurations and six neutral colorways—Black, Light Grey, Dark Grey, White, Champagne, and Bronze. Custom sizes and colors are also available. Topspin Draper Inc. Topspin is a retractable interior and exterior shading system comprised of a series of fabric panels and spring rollers. This system can be installed on horizontal, vertical, and sloped glazing, and it’s capable of withstanding wind speeds up to 38 mph. Topspin is available in widths up to 10 feet and lengths up to 40 feet. SkyScape Pregrown Modular System Firestone This 15-inch-by-20-inch vegetative roof system features a foundation comprised of 100 percent recycled high-density polypropylene and a durable honeycomb structure that allows plants to share moisture and nutrients. Each module weighs 50 lbs., features an interlock below grade on all four sides to withstand high winds, and manages stormwater through unitized moisture retention reservoirs. Autodesk Insight 360 Autodesk With the Autodesk Insight 360 software program, architects can easily access building energy and environmental performance data, such as whole building energy, heating, cooling, daylighting, and solar radiation simulations. The interactive software allows architects to create 3-D models with Revit and FormIt 360 Pro, giving them an inside look at real-time performance outcomes.
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The Key To Everything Green

Nashville Public Square, 2007 Green Roof & Wall Award of Excellence winner, Courtesy of Green Roofs for Healthy Cities / Hawkins Partners Landscape Architects. The green roof and wall industry has always been focused on the role of water—we can’t sustain green roofs and walls without it. The theme of this year’s CitiesAlive: Green Roof & Wall Conference is “Water: The Key To Everything Green.” Programming will explore how green roofs and walls can play a key role in onsite stormwater management and a more holistic approach to water use and reuse. Here are some great examples of why water will be the topic on everyone’s mind in Tennessee. Opening Plenary: The Great Debate—To Irrigate or Not To Irrigate The new LEED v4 outdoor water use reduction standards may trigger the removal of irrigation systems on green roofs. Is this good for projects? Or does it threaten viability and longevity? How will green roof and wall installations survive in the face of climate change and unpredictable weather patterns? Net Zero Water: Boot Camp Launch We are pleased to announce the roll out of the first two-day Net Zero Water Boot Camp, scheduled November 11-12 to kick off CitiesAlive. The courses cover everything from water capture and storage to treatment and reuse. Other ½ day training opportunities also available. Upgrade your professional expertise and earn CEUs in Nashville this fall. Industry Experts Take on The Water Theme Each year, CitiesAlive features up to 100 panel presenters that address the most up-to-date research, policy and design that drives excellence in the living architecture sector. This year is no exception, featuring two days of top notch programming. Rebecca Black is the director of business development at Green Roofs for Healthy Cities.  FIND OUT MORE There has never been a better time to come visit Music City. November 12-15, 2014 in Nashville, Tennessee. Learn more and register today at www.citiesalive.org.
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Two Opportunities to Learn Dynamo at facades+PERFORMANCE

BIM continues to transform the process of design and building. Dynamo for Autodesk Vasari is a leading open source visual programming environment that extends the parametric capabilities of Revit and Vasari.  April’s facades+PERFORMANCE conference in New York includes two conference tech workshops focusing on Dynamo. Gil Akos of Mode Lab will lead Enhanced Parametric Design with Dynamo (4 AIA CES LU credits). Participants will learn the fundamentals of parametric design within Dynamo, with attention to how the application can be used during every stage of the design process. The workshop will also feature a preview of work-in-progress versions of the open-source software.Workshop attendees will receive a one-month complimentary subscription to Mode Lab, a source for in-person and online education in digital design tools. Mode Lab and Autodesk are also hosting a live Q&A on Dynamo on March 21, 2014. Learn more here. For conference-goers interested in how Dynamo can be used to design for better environmental performance, there’s Solar Radiation and Daylighting Analysis with Dynamo (8 AIA CES LU credits). Mett Jezyk and Ian Keough, both of Autodesk, will lead the workshop. In the morning session, participants will learn how to use Dynamo to evaluate solar radiation on a building exterior and set up a recursive optimization strategy. After lunch, the workshop will focus on using Dynamo as a cloud service to access daylighting analysis capabilities. Both workshops take place on April 25. Register for a facades+PERFORMANCE tech workshop today on the event registration page.
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Facades+ Headliners Usher in The Future of Performance

There's a lot to be excited about in the jam-packed schedule of intimate dialog and tech workshops on day two of AN and Enclos’ upcoming Facades+ PERFORMANCE conference. But don't forget about the exciting keynote-speakers headlining day one! Industry leaders Stefan Behnisch of Benisch Architekten and Gerardo Salinas of Rojkind Arquitectos will set the tone as they discuss the effects of emerging design, fabrication, and construction techniques on building facades in our current technological, environmental, and economic landscape. Leading innovators from across the AEC industry will be on-hand to redefine sustainable facade performance, so don’t miss this rare opportunity. Register now and mark it down on your calendar: Facades+ PERFORMANCE, October 24th-25th at the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Main Campus in Chicago. “For me, performance means going beyond the technical behavior of a facade or technical system to incorporate new-found relationships between technology, fabrication, and understanding the full potential and use of the local craftsmanship to obtain the desired results," Salinas told AN. "At Rojkind Arquitectos, we look at every project as a state of active awareness fueled by continuous research, cross-pollination and context sensitivity. Rather than focusing on 'all' we selectively choose a context and adapt our thinking to recognize opportunity under those parameters.” Before returning to his native Mexico in 2010 to become the first partner at Rojkind Arquitectos, Gerardo Salinas worked on several master planning and institution projects with Ellerbe Becket, acted as Senior Project Designer with HNTB and Senior Associate at Anderson Mason Dale Architects, and demonstrated his expertise and dedication to sustainable design as a member of the U.S. Green Building Council. In his keynote address, “The Economics of Fabrication,” Salinas will discuss how, by viewing the users' needs as sources of inspiration, his firm is able to construct designs that maximize potential while maintaining attainability. “The facade as a building’s skin is becoming a more and more complex element in architectural development,” said Stefan Benisch, founder and principal of Behnisch Architekten. “Considering that the number of trades and different materials within a building is decreasing, and the remaining, fewer trades will become more complex, the facade then needs to become a highly sophisticated, complex, integrated element, not unlike what the skin represents for the body.” In his keynote address, “Techinical and Architectural Expectations: The rapidly developing role of the building skin in the wake of new technologies,” Bensich will bring his decades’ worth of knowledge and experience to the Facades+ stage. Through his award winning work, like the Norddeutsche Landesbank in Hannover, Behnisch has infused dynamic, eye-catching design with forward-thinking sustainable technologies to create buildings that provide maximum benefit to their users, the public realm, and the natural environment. Join him on October 24 to see the projects that are paving the way for the next era of sustainable facade design and construction. Reserve your space now to hear more from these and other groundbreaking professionals on the future of high performance facades and the technologies that are revolutionizing our built environment, only at Facades+ PERFORMANCE
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San Francisco Facades+ Performance Conference: One Month and Counting!

The San Francisco Facades+ Performance conference is exactly one month away! Join the conversation and rake in up to 8 AIA LU credits per day at the conference, presented by AN and enclos, July 11 to 12, 2013. An abundance of good information, networking opportunities, and hands-on workshops are on the agenda, so don’t miss the chance to attend this year’s invaluable two-day event. The symposium on Day 1 consists of exciting presentations and discussion-based panels that investigate the ever more fast-paced development of facade technology, tackle new-fangled viewpoints on building skins, and discover ground-breaking, sustainable design practices. Ken Yeang of Hamzah & Yeang will present the morning Keynote Address, Eco-Architecture: Living Facades and Architecture and Gary Handel of Handel Architects will give the afternoon Keynote Address, Glass Without Guilt. Dialog and Tech Workshops form Day 2, which offers a rare chance to participate in comprehensive conversations with renowned design professionals in a small seminar-style setting. Participants have the opportunity to customize their specific programs to cater to their individual professional goals and interests by choosing half-day workshops from morning and afternoon sessions. Participants may also select one of six daylong workshops in which they will work closely with industry professionals on hands-on projects to build indispensable skills essential in utilizing revolutionary facade technologies. Speaker highlights include Edward Peck of Thornton Tomasetti, Claire Mazfield of Atelier Ten, and David Frey of SOM among other exceptional panelists. Take a look at the agenda and register today – Early Bird registration ends this Friday, June 14.
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APA Hands Out National Planning Excellence Awards

Northwest Indiana’s 2040 masterplan took home top honors for comprehensive planning last week, when the American Planning Association handed out its 2013 National Planning Excellence Awards. The association also saluted 12 projects with the first-ever National Planning Achievement Awards. Tying into a major theme at this year’s conference, the APA award winners tended toward projects with an ambitious scope, such as Philadelphia’s sweeping planning and zoning rewrite and New York’s Zone Green initiative. Cincinnati’s riverfront development, The Banks, won the implementation award, winning praise for its resurrection of an area cut off from downtown by an expressway since the 1950s. Since then the city’s population has dropped 41 percent. But after a low point in 2002 when the mayor abolished the planning department, Cincinnati is in the midst of a “rebirth,” according to city planners there. “How do we modernize our city without suburbanizing it?” asked Katherine Keough-Jurs, a senior city planner with Cincinnati. She was speaking at a panel on the resurgence of urban planning in the city. “Maybe what makes our city great is what we strayed away from. Let’s look back to that.” Bridging the expressway that once severed downtown from what is now, The Banks was one key example. The city is also developing a form-based code, targeted to areas where walkable communities still thrive. The goal is to keep planners from trying to start a new neighborhood center where it would compete with an existing one. Michael Osur, Deputy Director of the Riverside County, California Department of Public Health was selected for the National Planning Excellence Award for a Planning Advocate and Ronald Shiffman was named National Planning Award for a Planning Pioneer. Goody Clancy, Interface Studio, and the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning were also awarded in the Planning Firm, Emerging Planning & Design Firm, and Planning Agency, respectively. More National Planning Excellence Awards winners, from coast to coast, below. View the twelve winners of the National Planning Achievement Awards here. (All images courtesy APA.) National Planning Excellence Award for a Grassroots Initiative Cathedral City's Environmental Conservation Division (ECD) Kids & Community Program Cathedral City, California From the APA: "The Environmental Conservation Division (ECD) Kids & Community Program is an environmental education and awareness project where young people conceptualize, design, plan and create hands-on environmental projects that help reduce landfill waste and beautify the landscape of Cathedral City. The program's goals include making recycling and conservation fun, preserving the beauty of the local environment, and encouraging youth to play an active role in community efforts. It engages youth within the community and offers a way to learn about the environment while being part of the solution." The HUD Secretary's Opportunity & Empowerment Award  Restoring the American City: Augusta's Laney Walker/Bethlehem Augusta, Georgia From the APA: "The Laney Walker/Bethlehem Revitalization Initiative involves two historic African American neighborhoods and is a pioneering effort to reverse decades of blight and disinvestment and regenerate nearly 1,100 acres of Augusta's urban center. This decision to catalyze regeneration of Augusta's urban core was primarily driven by politics and the need to address a historically disenfranchised population. The project addresses a number of needs and community objectives outlined in the Augusta-Richmond County Comprehensive Plan, including affordable housing, access to jobs and services, open space, blight abatement, infill development, and preservation of local heritage." Daniel Burnham Award for a Comprehensive Plan  2040 Comprehensive Regional Plan: A Vision for Northwest Indiana Lake, Porter and LaPorte Counties, Indiana From the APA: "The Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission's (NIRPC) 2040 Comprehensive Regional Plan (CRP) represents the first broad planning initiative covering the counties of Lake, Porter and LaPorte. The CRP focuses on a variety of issues including transportation, land use, human and economic resources, and environmental policy objectives. The objective is to offer residents more transportation choices, and making the cities more sustainable and livable." The Pierre L'Enfant International Planning Award The Valsequillo Initiative Puebla, Mexico From the APA: "The Valsequillo Initiative is a planning effort not only to improve the quality of urban areas growing around the Valsequillo Reservoir and increase opportunities for area residents and remediate decades of environmental degradation, but it also aimed to unify urban and environmental planning for the first time. Four years ago, the 58,000-acre Valsequillo region was set to become a new mega-development, a companion city to Puebla, Mexico's fourth largest urban area. Development proposals would have reduced the value of the area's ecological resources and displaced indigenous communities, small farmers, and communal landholders." National Planning Excellence Award for Urban Design Lancaster Central Market: Assessments, Guidelines, and Recommendations for Preservation and Development Lancaster, Pennsylvania From the APA: "The Lancaster Central Market: Assessments, Guidelines, and Recommendations for Preservation and Development guidelines was created after a comprehensive study of the Lancaster Central Market that connected the importance of architectural preservation, urban development history, and cultural heritage, to present planning and development decisions. The Central Market is on the National Register of Historic Places and was named by APA as one of the Great Public Spaces in America. The study of the Central Market that resulted in the planning guidelines was a regional first, producing a historical-architectural report to guide building renovations, before decisions were made for a capital improvement project." apa_awards_05 National Planning Excellence Award for Environmental Planning NYC Department of City Planning, Zone Green New York, New York From the APA: "Zone Green is an initiative to modernize regulations for greener buildings. It is a coordinated package of zoning amendments, city legislation, and state legislation that promotes the construction and retrofitting of greener buildings. The regulatory changes adopted through Zone Green affect all categories of buildings throughout New York City, from single-family detached homes to high-density office buildings. It also gives owners and builders more choices for investments to save energy, save money, and improve environmental performance." National Planning Excellence Award for Transportation StarMetro's Route Decentralization Tallahassee, Florida From the APA: "For years, StarMetro operated a hub-and-spoke transit system that brought all passengers to one central transfer location downtown. Riders were forced to unnecessarily travel through the central business district to get to work, resulting in extended commutes and overcrowding. A survey revealed that 93 percent of passengers were traveling somewhere other than downtown. StarMetro was tasked with decentralizing all routes at the same time, within its normal operating budget." apa_awards_13 The HUD Secretary's Opportunity and Empowerment Award Owe'neh Bupingeh Preservation Plan Ohkay Owingeh, New Mexico From the APA: "Ohkay Owingeh is the first Pueblo tribe to develop a comprehensive preservation plan that guides practical housing improvements according to cultural values. The Owe'neh Bupingeh Rehabilitation Project is a multi-year, affordable housing, rehabilitation project within the historic core of the tribe's village center. Only 60 homes remain of the nearly several hundred that once existed. Most had been abandoned by 2005 due to deterioration." apa_awards_11 National Planning Excellence Award for a Best Practice Philadelphia's Integrated Planning and Zoning Process Philadelphia, Pennsylvania From the APA: "The Philadelphia City Planning Commission's (PCPC) integrated Planning and Zoning Process is an innovative approach to leveraging the synergy between citizen education, planning, and zoning reform. The PCPC coordinated three distinct planning activities — the Citizens Planning Institute (CPI), Philadelphia2035 (the city's comprehensive plan) and a new zoning code and map revision. Individually, these activities educated hundreds of citizens and professionals, and engaged thousands in envisioning the future of Philadelphia and improving the way development is regulated. Collectively, they created an environment that hadn't existed for 50 years. The city not only adopted a new comprehensive plan and zoning code, but did so in the same year and has moved forward with implementation." apa_awards_07 National Planning Excellence Award for a Communications Initiative We Love Lake Oswego Video City of Lake Oswego, Oregon From the APA: "The City of Lake Oswego created the "We Love Lake Oswego" video as part of its public outreach effort to educate and engage the community in the comprehensive planning process. The video objectives were to convey a compelling story about why to plan for the future, provide a clear, concise concept of what the comprehensive plan update is about, and offer inspiration for the community to participate in the planning process." National Planning Excellence Award for Public Outreach Newberg 6th Grade Design Star Program Newberg, Oregon From the APA: "The Design Star Program is a learning collaboration between the City of Newberg and local 6th grade students that has engaged students in city planning. The program started as part of the city's outreach efforts during National Community Planning Month and is now an annual collaboration between Newberg city staff and middle school teachers and has been integrated into the curriculum. The program teaches students about why things are organized a certain way in their city, and it allows them to think critically about both the positive and negative impacts of development, the need for jobs in the community, how to differentiate between city wants and city needs, as well as environmental impacts of commuting for jobs and recreation. It also teaches students mapping, writing, presentation, and teamwork skills." apa_awards_02 Advancing Diversity & Social Change in Honor of Paul Davidoff YWCA Central Alabama Birmingham, Alabama From the APA: "The YWCA Central Alabama undertook a multimillion-dollar urban neighborhood revitalization effort called YWoodlawn. The YWoodlawn Plan was a collaborative empowerment initiative intended to reduce poverty and hopelessness within an underserved area of Birmingham through reinvesting in the neighborhood; providing innovative housing for families experiencing homelessness; introducing affordable transition housing for families; bringing health, education, and employment-based services to the community's doorstep; and reintroducing homeownership opportunities in a stable, growing community."
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Ray LaHood Touts High-Speed Rail at UIC Urban Forum

  Cities matter. In the Midwest recent headlines have read like an urban planning syllabus: post-industrial rebirth attracts a new generation of urbanites downtown, the roll-out of high-speed rail begins to pick up pace, and while innovative solutions to the region’s well-documented problems abound, a lingering fiscal crisis and unfunded pension liabilities threaten to squash even the most attainable aspirations. Those topics and more made the agenda at University of Illinois Chicago’s annual Urban Forum held Thursday, whose lineup included the mayors of Columbus and Pittsburgh, as well as U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood. “Metropolitan Resilience in a Time of Economic Turmoil” was the topic at hand. Sporting reindeer antlers, a protestor was removed from the conference for trying to confront UIC board of trustees Chairman Christopher Kennedy over an ongoing labor dispute at the University. His opening salvo may have summed up the emotional state of the intertwined crises of labor and urban redevelopment better than the slew of statistics his target subsequently laid out, but the numbers are indeed telling: Illinois faces the nation’s largest unfunded pension liability; Chicago and Cook County grapple with decaying infrastructure and persistent impoverishment—some 500,000 people in the suburbs live in poverty, outnumbering those in the city. Governor Quinn and Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle skipped out on their scheduled appearances to deal with ongoing pension negotiations, but their deputy staffers filled in for the hand-wringing. It would cost so much just to “stop the pain,” said Deputy Mayor Steven Koch, and pay off debt interest at all three levels of government that doing so would bankrupt them instantly. At least they are not alone. “We have a particularly bad form of this disease,” Koch said, “but the disease is widespread.” Somewhat less grim was the following panel, which asked the top brass of Columbus, Las Vegas, and Pittsburgh to share their municipal travails. Facing financial crisis in 2001 and then again in 2008, Columbus “had to make a decision about what kind of city we wanted to be,” according to Mayor Michael Coleman. Service cuts were unavoidable, he said, but cutting too much could plunge the city into a spiral from which it would take decades to recover. Faced with cutting firemen and police, Coleman said he approached the business community with plans for a half-percent tax hike. They and the public supported it, he said, in lieu of further cuts. In Pittsburgh, Mayor Luke Ravenstahl recounted the steps he took to attract $5 billion in new downtown investment to the former steel city, which “hit the wall” around 1983. The ultra-green PNC Tower and a growing cadre of Google jobs were his celebrated examples, but he said investing in bike paths and other transportation infrastructure was critical to the revival of the city’s Bakery Square neighborhood. Secretary LaHood closed the day with a rallying cry for high-speed rail that minced no words. “High-speed rail is coming to America,” he said. “There’s no stopping it. We are not going back.” Though the secretary deflected credit for the policy change onto the President, he said his legacy would be safety, pointing to distracted driving restrictions now on the books in 39 states. “Everyone knows what’s needed in the United States,” LaHood said. “The issue is how do we pay for it?” Federal grant programs for multimodal transportation projects have expanded under the Recovery act, but LaHood said the key to sustaining growth was leveraging private money, in part through strategic loan programs. As for governors refusing to spend federal money on rail projects in their states, the secretary said, “Elections matter.”
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Facades+Innovation in Chicago: Romero’s reunion, adaptive glazings and more

AN's Facades + Innovation Conference wrapped up last Friday in Chicago, rounding out the event’s inaugural run from New York to San Francisco and ending at the Illinois Institute of Technology. Architects, engineers, builders, and designers at today’s symposium plumbed the conceptual depths of form as well as the materials, programs and trends that could guide the future of design. Fernando Romero, founder of architecture firm FREE, kicked off the morning with a tour of his facade work, from the hexagonal network of mirrored steel tiles enclosing the Museo Soumaya in Mexico City, to IIT’s McCormick Tribune Campus Center just two blocks from the conference hall. Romero worked on the McCormick Center while at OMA, but had never before visited the completed structure. Walking through the building after his talk, delivered on his 41st birthday, the architect said it was a gift to finally visit. Digital tools are part and parcel with contemporary building design, but speakers with the digital technologies panel focused in on some important advances in the field. Thornton Tomasetti, who are working with Morphosis on Cornell University’s new computing and information science building and the first phase of the Cornell-Technion Tech Campus on Manhattan's Roosevelt Island, spoke of Grasshopper tools that calculate column sizes, beam sizes and the like to determine a building’s embodied carbon. This data links with EnergyPlus programs to accurately model environmental performance over a building’s lifetime. Will Laufs directed our attention to adaptive glazings on high-performance mold-generated facades. Open-molded modern concrete allowed for elegantly detailed ductile facades, but it was the high-tech aspirations of the technology that proved most interesting. By weaving electronics into the facade, windows could become dynamic “screen prints” that shift solar heat gain coefficients, say, as occupants pass by certain areas. We also heard about current trends in the industry, including the prevalence of “design build” in the loosest sense: Architects are joining builders in the design process earlier, and vice versa. “Executive architects,” meanwhile are bringing a comprehensive approach to permitting, mediating conflicts between a difficult projects many trades and disciplines. Given the collegiate setting, we fittingly turned to academic experts for the day’s final panel. From Cal Poly to Milwaukee, we heard a chorus of professors encouraging collaboration and freethinking in design studios. Stepping out of the ivory tower was a common theme as well, with teachers touting practical design projects and funded faculty research that engages graduate and post-graduate students directly in creative work. We hope to see you next year: Our 2013 conference will come to New York City first, on April 11 and 12. We’ll take the show to San Francisco in July and see you in Chicago next fall.