Posts tagged with "Competitions":

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How Fruity?

Just a reminder that everyone has until Tuesday, September 1, to make their submissions to the Redesign Your Farmers Market competition launched earlier this month by us, GOOD, The Urban & Enviromental Policy Institute at Occidental College, and the LA Good Food Network. They've updated the submission guidelines, so be sure to check 'em out, as well as three proposals that have already gotten the thumbs up.
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Reburbia Resolved

Judges of Dwell and inhabitat's Reburbia competition split the difference between fantasy and pragmatism in picking winners out of last week's 20 finalists. Grand prize went to "Frog's Dream," Calvin Chiu's fanciful vision of abandoned McMansions converted into wetlands.  Judge Geoff Manaugh of BLDGBLOG readily acknowledged the plan was chosen not in spite of its surrealism, but because of it:  "It's poetic, not practical - and that's exactly why this project is positive evidence of how we might really rethink suburbia," he said. But the jury's second favorite was one of the only entries, out of 400, that was a policy proposal rather than a design proposal.  "Entrepreneurbia: rezoning suburbia for self-sustaining life," submitted by Urban Nature, F&S Design Studio and Silverlion Design, suggested changing zoning laws to allow small businesses to take root in suburbia.  Judge Jill Fehrenbacher, founder of inhabitat, called it "clearly the most practical, cost-effective and energy-efficient proposal submitted to us, and therefore the one which has the biggest potential to effect real change." Coming in third was Forrest Fulton's proposal for turning big box store parking lots into farms, and the winner of last week's online "People's Choice" contest -- garnering 2300 votes -- was Galina Tahchieva's "Urban Sprawl Repair Kit," which devised infill strategies for five common suburban building patterns.
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Head of the Class

The AIA just announced the projects that received the highest marks in this year’s Educational Facility Design Awards, and they’re a diverse class – the 13 winners run the gamut from urban to rural, elementary to university, built to unbuilt. Deemed “excellent” by the jury, Antoine Predock Architect’s Indian Community School follows a long ridge on a former farm outside Milwaukee, sidestepping historic trees and sporting a roof of overlapping angled planes that blends into the site’s topography.  Bohlin Cywinski Jackson’s Visitor Center for the Parks Service in Pennsylvania borrows from its setting to make a plea for environmental consciousness instead:  its shingles were cut on-site from old tires found in the streams and woods nearby. The urban designs may be more constrained by their settings, but they acquit themselves admirably.  In Chicago, OWP|P converted Ralph Ellison elementary school into a high school, renovating the original 1926 limestone building and grafting on a modern glass box with a mosaic of glazed windows.  Another striking visual comes from Daly Genik Architects:  On a long, skinny site sandwiched between two highways in Los Angeles, their industrial-chic Camino Nuevo High School has corrugated metal sides that muffle street sounds while cooling the building at the same time: stylish and smart. Full list of winners: “Excellent”: Indian Community School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin (Antoine Predock Architect, PC) Yale University Sculpture Building and Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut (Kieran Timberlake) Environmental Education/Visitor Activity Center, National Park Service, Pennsylvania (Bohlin Cywinski Jackson) “Merit”: Francis Parker School, San Diego, California (Lake|Flato Architects) ASU Polytechnic Academic Complex, Mesa, Arizona (RSP Architects, Ltd. in association with Lake|Flato Architects) Camino Nuevo High School, Los Angeles, California (Daly Genik) Canada’s National Ballet School, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects) “Citation": Cornell University West Campus Residence Initiative, Ithaca, New York (Kieran Timberlake) Staples Elementary School, Easton, Connecticut (The S|L|A|M Collaborative) Ralph Ellison Campus, Chicago, Illinois (OWP|P) Avon Old Farms Beaston Performing Arts Center, Avon, Connecticut (The S|L|A|M Collaborative) Modular Zero Energy Classroom, Hawaii (Anderson Anderson Architecture) Green Dot Animo Leadership High School, Lennox, California (Pugh + Scarpa Architects, Inc.)
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Fill it In, Trick it Out

Dwell and inhabitat's REBURBIA competition last month drew hundreds of schemes for making the suburbs more sustainable, and now they want your votes to pick a "readers' choice" winner from the 20 finalists. (The official winners will be picked next week by a jury, and featured in Dwell's December/January issue). Nearly half of the entries suggest filling in suburbia by re-purposing space from roads, parking lots, big-box stores and McMansions.  Others propose tricking it out with new technology:  turbines installed over freeways to harness the wind energy created by cars whizzing underneath; a device to enable parked cars to generate enough energy overnight to power houses; a new airborne system of mass transit.

There's a strong strain of retro-futurism detectable in the current front-runners.  Alexandros Tsolakis and Irene Shamma's sleek airships make you want to don a jetpack and silver jumpsuit.  And Light + Space's towers of sustainable residences bear a striking resemblence to Safdie's Habitat '67.

This is the popular vote, so just like in high school, the sexy designs are getting the attention while the zoning-policy proposals sit all by themselves in the cafeteria.  Head over to the competition website through August 17th to check out the finalists, and maybe even consider parking your lunch tray next to some of the underdogs.
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Emerald City

What if one block in Texas became the sustainable model for the world? Such was the question posed recently by Urban Re:Vision, a California-based group bent upon creating better cities through rethinking the components that make up a city block. Earlier this month, the organization unveiled the three finalists in one of its latest design competitions: Re:Vision Dallas. Contestants were asked to create proposals for a mixed-use development near downtown that would do "no harm to people or place." Find out more about the finalists after the jump: Each of the three winning proposals boasted strong themes of nature and working the land. Entangled Bank, by the Charlotte, North Carolina, architecture firm Little, features a "sky pasture", where livestock would graze, and a vertical farm. The multi-phased development includes both podium and tower elements, each outfitted with energy-producing technology such as solar panels and vertical wind turbines. The project was also programmed sustainably, including such community resources as a nutrition center, an organic culinary institute, and daycare. Forwarding Dallas, by the Portuguese firm Atelier Data & MOOV, is morphologically inspired by the natural landscape of hills and valleys. The buildings would boast trees and "luxurious" plants in the gullies, and more sturdy vegetation at the higher elevations, with the tops of the promontories bedecked with solar panels and wind turbines. Last but not least, Greenways Xero Energy, by David Baker and Partners Architects and Fletcher Studio of San Francisco, California, rides the line between a public market and a barnyard. Broken into three separated masses, the project would engage its residents as well as its neighbors with public orchards, community gardens, and locally supplied restaurants. Equipped with solar panels, though no wind turbines, Xero also features such energy saving devices as solar hot water, a ground source heat pump, and hybrid desiccant cooling system. While many Urban Re:Vision competitions and projects have been strictly theoretical, Re:Vision Dallas will put the ideas it generates into bricks and mortar. Dallas has already purchased the land for the development and the mayor is backing the plan to bring a paragon of sustainability to Texas.
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Lost in Translation

While searching for competitions on a number of architecture websites, I came across a misleading description of an international competition in Madrid, Spain, sponsored by the COAM (Colegio Oficial de Arquitectos de Madrid). English-language sites are promoting a “Solar City” competition that would deal with “solar intervention strategies for temporary use in an artistic, architectural development, particularly in neighborhood involvement,” according to one. What does “solar intervention” mean? Using solar panels? Smarter orientation of buildings? Funnily enough the whole purpose of the competition is twisted by a bad translation, since “solar” in Spanish means “site,” and has nothing to do with our astro rey, the Sun. The competition, in fact, is about proposing temporary uses for urban sites, and might more correctly be translated as, “Ideas for the Development and Temporary Use of Urban Gaps.” The real objective is to identify spaces in the urban grid that have been abandoned after a demolition or remain undeveloped or inactive, which could be reprogrammed for temporary community uses and to design strategies for reuse. Jokes aside, it would be a shame if English-speaking competitors miss the point of this interesting brief. Check out or competitions page for up to date (and, we hope, correctly translated) information.
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Your Chance To Fix LA's Transit Mess!!!!

What do Thom Mayne, Eric Owen Moss, Neil Denari, LA Planning director Gail Goldberg, and Aspet Davidian,  engineering director at the LA County Metropolitan Transportation Authority have in common? They're all on the jury for The Architect's Newspaper and SCI-Arc's new competition, A NEW INFRASTRUCTURE: Innovative Transit Solutions for Los Angeles. Launching today, the competition takes advantage of LA County's Measure R, which  will provide up to $40 billion for transit-related projects across the city over the next 30 years. It asks  architects, engineers, urban planners, and students to propose new ideas that use design to dramatically rethink the relationships between transit systems, public space and urban redevelopment.  Entries will focus on specific rail extension projects and also take a look at larger-scale, inter-related transit planning challenges. Potential competitors can download the competition outline and registration here. Entries are due March 15, and winners will be announced on March 21.
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And the Real Winner Is...

As we mentioned Tuesday, there was some confusion as to who had won the CityRacks Design Competition--held by the city's Department of Transportation, the Cooper-Hewitt, and Transportation Alternatives--given that no official announcement had been made last week. Whether Bustler's report impacted the decision or not may never be known, but it was the "Hoop" (above) and not, as predicted, the "Alien" (after the jump) that carried the day. Ian Mahaffy and Maarten De Greeve of Copenhagen beat out 200 challengers, including 10 finalists, to be named kings of New York City bike racks. In addition to the $10,000 prize they will receive, some 5,000 hoops will be installed throughout the city in the next three years. "The jury was convinced that the Mahaffy and De Greeve design will best meet the City's bike parking needs and generate greater interest in cycling," DOT head Janette Sadik-Khan said in a statement. The competition also honored two designs for indoor bicycle parking, which should come in handy now that the city is advocating a zoning change to require bike garages in new large-scale developments.