Posts tagged with "Citi Bike":

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NYC to add more bike lanes in response to surging demand

New York City streets are a decadent mass of pedestrians, cabs, delivery trucks, and the crosstown bus, all scooting somewhere quickly. But even as rideshare apps are pushing more cars on the pavement, there's one green and steadfast transit option that's seeing a surprising surge in popularity.

Right now, the city's streets host 450,000 bike rides per day, an increase of 280,00 trips from 2005. To meet accelerating demand, the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) promised on Monday to add 50 miles of painted bike lanes and ten miles of protected paths each year.

Over the last decade, New York has seen an explosion of bike infrastructure. Crain's reports that cyclists now cruise over 1,133 miles of bike lanes, up from a little over 500 miles in 2006. Of those, around 40 percent are shielded from automobiles by concrete or other physical barriers. These are the gold-standard tracks because of the protection they provide relative to painted paths.

But even this relatively robust network can't stop bike fatalities. Nine in ten cyclists killed while riding are killed outside of bike lanes. In response, the DOT plans to ramp up safety efforts in three Queens and seven Brooklyn neighborhoods where many bike fatalities and injuries occur.

Still, officials are optimistic that bikesharing, which was introduced only four years ago, will become further enmeshed in New York's urban fabric. City Councilmember Ydanis Rodríguez, who represents Upper Manhattan and serves on the council's transportation committee, would like to one day see free transfers between Citi Bike, the city's bikeshare system, and the MTA. (An annual Citi Bike membership costs $163.) Citi Bike broke ridership records with more than 70,000 riders on one day in June of this year, while last year, the system logged more than 14 million rides.

Despite their low cost relative to cars, and emissions-free crunchy-green aura that renders bicycles anodyne in most quarters, New Yorkers haven't embraced bike culture universally. On the Upper East Side last year, residents objected to bike lanes near a school, worried that speeding cyclists could mow down young ones. Though those crosstown lanes were ultimately approved, out in Corona, Queens, longtime Community Board 4 member (and unrepentant xenophobe) Ann Pfoser Darby called bike lanes in her neighborhood a waste of money, claiming they would be empty after President Trump deported the area's undocumented immigrants.

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Fight breaks out at Community Board 6 meeting over bikeshare stations

This post is part of our years-long running Eavesdrop series (think page 6 for the architectural field). It’s your best source for gossip, insider stories, and more. Have an eavesdrop of your own? Send it to: eavesdrop[at]archpaper.com.

It turns out not everyone loves a pollution-free alternative to CO2-belching cars and overcrowded public transportation in Brooklyn. At a Community Board 6 (CB6) meeting last month, one longtime Cobble Hill resident lashed out at a board member over the location of the neighborhood’s new bikeshare docking stations. Even though the locations of the Citi Bike stations have been public knowledge for nearly a year, the resident was captured on video yelling at the member, who sits on the board’s transportation subcommittee: “Is there a bike stand in front of your house? What are you gonna do? “You’re gonna hit me? What are you gonna do?” An anonymous attendee called the NYPD to intervene but no arrests were made.

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New York City’s Citi Bike bike-share system expands into New Jersey

Bike sharing is a trend that is taking the country by storm of late as Jersey City, New Jersey, jumps on the biking bandwagon installing 35 docking stations for 350 bicycles. The new Jersey City bike sharing setup will work in sync New York City's system and will have the same pricing scheme. Likewise, membership to either system overlaps with the other, so bikes can be used across both cities. Docking stations have been placed near PATH stations and spread over the city and into the suburbs. In fact, nearly every neighborhood will have one. Subsequently the distances between docking locations is longer than that compared to the system in NYC. In New York, Motivate, the group behind the scheme, focused on core areas and then dispersed docking locations later on. Speaking to the Jersey Journal, Mayor Steve Fulop said, "We wanted each of the areas in the city to have access right from the start. That was a priority." Dispersing the docks so widely is a risk however, as commuters may be put off cycling the longer distances. Fulop though expressed his excitement for the system to be integrated city-wide. “It’s not very often that a city gets a completely new public transit system, a new way to enjoy the outdoors and stay active, and a new link to New York all at once, but that’s what we have today with Citi Bike,” Fulop said in a press release. “This is something that will connect every corner of the city. We have bike stations in every ward.” Part of the appeal of the biking scheme is that it doesn't require any public money for operating subsidies. Like in NYC, Citi Bike Jersey City is funded by private sponsorships and user fees. Motivate president and CEO Jay Walder said: “Thanks to Mayor Fulop’s visionary leadership and the support of terrific sponsors, the Citi Bike program is now a seamless regional transportation network improving commutes on both sides of the Hudson.”
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With deal in place, Citi Bike system set to expand in 2015

It's happening. After years of talks and reports, it's actually, finally, in-paper, happening—Citi Bike is expanding. Tuesday, at the Queensbridge Houses in Queens, DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg announced that the system of 6,000 bikes will double by the end of 2017—putting 2,000 more bikes on the streets than initially envisioned when the program was launched. The news comes as Bikeshare Holdings, a private investment company headed by the CEOs of Equinox and Related Companies, acquires Alta Bicycle Share, which oversees Citi Bike, and other bikeshare programs around the world. As the Daily News first reported, former MTA Chairman Jay Walder will serve as Alta's new CEO. Starting next year, a new fleet of blue bikes will arrive in Williamsburg, Greenpoint, and Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn, and in Long Island City, Queens. As Citi Bike noted on its blog, all of these stations were intended to be part of the program's "initial deployment." Based on a map provided by Citi Bike, the second phase of expansion will include Upper Manhattan, Astoria, Queens, and more Brooklyn neighborhoods. But the system won't just be expanded, it will be entirely overhauled. Anyone who has been on a Citi Bike recently knows why—seats are torn, bikes are broken, docks are out-of-service, and the credit card system is glitchy. To pay for all of this, and to keep the program solvent moving forward, Citi Bike will raise the annual membership fee from $95 a year to $149. The $60 annual membership New York City Housing residents will not change. According to the NYC DOT, Bikeshare Holdings has invested $30 million into the program, the Partnership Fund for New York City pledged $5 million, the Goldman Sachs Urban Investment Group is lending $15 million for a credit increase, and Citigroup has increased its sponsorship commitment by $70.5 million and has extended it through 2024. (Citi initially paid $41 million for a five-year sponsorship contract). “We believe in Citi Bike’s potential as a fixture of New York City’s public transit system," Mayor de Blasio said in a statement. "It can make our neighborhoods more accessible, help us achieve our sustainability goals, and bridge inequities in our transportation network. To achieve all that, bike share has to be reliable and responsive to community’s needs. Today, after tremendous efforts across our administration, we can say we have the management and the support in place to fulfill that mission."
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Biker’s Tan: Citi Bike system opens in Miami next month

By now, you probably know about Citi Bike's woes in New York City: the damaged equipment, the broken seats, and—what else?—oh, right the money problems. But with a bailout reportedly imminent, and expansion likely next year, things are starting to looking up for the bike share system. And that's not all—the blue bikes aren't just expanding around New York, they're headed down to the palm tree-lined streets of Miami as well. No, it's not part of one giant, contiguous Citi Bike system, so you can stop planning that East Coast bike ride right now. Instead, as Miami's NewTimes reported, Miami Beach's bike-share system dubbed "DecoBike" is expanding into the city of Miami next month and will be rebranded as Citi Bike. The new Miami system will have 750 bikes and be run by DecoBike. [h/t Curbed Miami]
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With Some Cash From Related Companies, Citi Bike Could Expand Next Year

The latest piece in the ongoing saga of Citi Bike actually contains some good news. The Wall Street Journal first reported that Related Companies, through its affiliate, REQX Ventures, is close to finishing a deal that would inject millions of dollars into the struggling, but popular, bike share system. The influx of cash would  allow Citi Bike to expand into Upper Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens. It would also almost double the program's current number of bikes to 12,000. The program originally promised to deliver 10,000 bikes at its launch under the Bloomberg administration so there will be an extra 2,000 bikes crisscrossing the city. This, of course, comes with a cost. The Journal reported that Alta Bicycle Share—the company that operates Citi Bike—could raise the yearly membership price from $95 per year to $140 each year. A subsequent New York Times piece  said membership could actually increase to $155 per year. According to the Times, the expansion could begin next year with an expected completion in 2017. "The arrangement would wrest control from Alta, the company, based in Portland, Ore., that has partnered with the city to date, and give it to REQX, a venture formed by some principals of the real estate firm Related and the fitness chain Equinox," the Times reported. "REQX would also assume a majority stake in Alta’s other systems, in cities like Boston, Washington and Melbourne, Australia. The agreement could be announced as early as this week, though officials cautioned that a deal had not been completed."
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New York City Asks Citi Bike to Cover $1 Million in Lost Parking Revenue

New York City's bike share system, Citi Bike has had a rough first year. The bikes are in bad shape, the docking technology is glitchy, and the system has been plagued with financial troubles for months. To make matters worse for the beleaguered program, New York City is asking Alta Bikeshare—the company which oversees Citi Bike—to cough up $1 million to cover lost parking revenue from the parking spaces the bike stations occupy. According to the Wall Street Journal, a provision in Alta’s contract states that the company must reimburse the city for revenue lost from turning parking spaces into bike docking stations. That provision was part of  Mayor Bloomberg’s commitment to make the program entirely free of tax payer dollars—a commitment that Mayor de Blasio plans to keep. But because of ongoing negotiations between Alta and REQX Ventures—an investment firm that could provide Citi Bike with much-needed capital—this $1 million check may never be written or cashed. The two entities are reportedly trying to remove this parking provision from a revised contract. The Journal reported, "cutting Alta a break on lost parking revenue could be construed as an effective public subsidy, and could raise political and philosophical questions about whether taxpayers should support New York City's bike-share.” As with all Citi Bike news, though, what happens next is anyone's guess.
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Can a Canadian Furniture Magnate Save Citi Bike?

Given the past few weeks of Citi Bike news, the events that played out over last weekend shouldn’t come as a surprise. But, alas, they do. Bixi— the bankrupt Montreal company behind Citi Bike's glitchy equipment—was purchased by, who else, a Canadian furniture magnate named Bruno Rodi. Yes, the man whose company sells living-room furniture and bills itself as the "spécialiste du sofa" will himself become the "spécialiste du vélo." Rodi's winning offer of about $3.6 million (US) was around $1.4 million less than a bid put together by Related and Equinox Fitness. But the higher offer was dismissed by a judge who ruled that it missed the deadline and didn't include the minimum deposit. So, what does Rodi plan to do with Bixi? That’s hard to answer because he’s not currently talking to the press. He's busy sailing around the Indian Ocean at the moment. Why? Because he’s a world traveler, that's why. He’s reportedly sailed every sea and visited nearly every World Heritage Site. And one time, he rode his bike along the entire route of the Tour de France. As problems mount for Citi Bike, the people at CitiGroup are pretty darn satisfied with their involvement in the program. Citi's head of creative and media for North America marketing, Elyssa Gray, recently said they're already seeing returns on their initial investment. [h/t The Atlantic Cities.]

Citibank’s Elyssa Gray Extols Citi Bike As Difficulties Loom

Though dark clouds appear to be gathering, Citigroup is just peachy about the nearly year-old bike share program that bears their name. The financial corporation pledged $41 million to the initiative, allowing it to launch without a dime of public money. At the Ad Age Digital Conference, Elyssa Gray, director of creative media for North American marketing at Citibank, gushed about the popularity of the program and suggested that the bank is starting to recoup some of its investment. Ms. Gray revealed $4.4 million in earned media since Citi Bike's launch and sizable growth in brand preference. Despite these indications of profitability for Citi, the program's ultimate fate will depend on its ability to translate its much-lauded usage into self-sustaining revenue.
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Video> 48 Crazy Hours In the Life of a Citi Bike

While Citi Bike is publicly bleeding money and senior staff, the program continues to be extremely popular on the streets of New York. The blue bikes have woven themselves into the city’s urban fabric like yellow cabs, or halal carts, or rats eating shwarma that fell off a halal cart. New data released by Citi Bike shows that the bikes aren't just being used by tourists pedaling from MoMA to the High Line—they are a viable transportation option for the city's commuters. Sarah Kaufman of NYU’s Rudin School of Transportation, Juan Francisco Saldarriaga from Columbia’s Spatial Information Design Lab, and designer Jeff Ferzoco took some of Citi Bike's data and translated it into a video to show general patterns of the program. The map represents about 75,000 rides taken over a two-day period in September. Their work, which shows purple dots zipping around Brooklyn and Manhattan, isn’t too surprising: ridership is up dramatically around rush hour and is most concentrated in the financial district and Midtown. Researchers at NYU also discovered that Citi Bike has become a viable transit alternative—especially when the MTA is experiencing delays. So, Citi Bike has become a valuable transit alternative. “For the month of September, there is evidence of ‘reactionary biking,’ in which subway riders encountering delays likely switched modes to bike share for that trip,” they explain. And as the map shows, most people using the system are yearly members. That's great for New Yorkers—a one year membership sets them back less than a month on the MTA—but it is killing Citi Bike's bottom line. The program needs to up the yearly membership fee or boost sales on daily passes if it wants to stay solvent and continue to expand. That's because, unlike other bike share programs, Citi Bike receives no public money; and New York City Mayor de Blasio says that’s not going to change. If only there was a bank—perhaps one whose name is plastered all over the bikes—that could just write another check. If only.
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As New York’s Bikeshare System’s Challenges Mount, Citi Bike’s General Manager Resigns

Citi Bike’s week of bad news just got worse. After reports that the program was short tens of millions of dollars, and plagued with technical  and maintenance problems, Citi Bike's general manager, Justin Ginsburgh, has resigned. He is pedaling off to advise a construction firm. It’s not clear what’s next for the struggling, but popular program. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has said the city will not bail out the program, but it may allow Citi Bike to raise membership fees.  
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Citihack: Kickstart Your Bike-Share Commute With the Shareroller

Despite what your takeout dinner delivery person may have you believe, electric bikes are, in fact, a fine-able offense in New York City. Nonetheless, Manhattan resident Jeff Guida is hoping to make these outlawed vehicles much more common by selling a small, portable device that motorizes Citi Bikes, the city's popular bike-share network. The Shareroller is housed in an 8-inch-by-11-inch-by-3-inch box that, once mounted, turns share-bikes into e-bikes. While New York was the laboratory for the product, the engine can be installed on many bike-share systems in other major cities—like Washington, D.C., Chicago, London, Montreal, and Toronto—as they all share the use of the same basic vehicle model. The product boasts an installation/removal time of ten seconds and claims it allows users to reach top speeds of 18 mph. The Shareroller also comes equipped with a pair of LED headlights and a built-in USB charging port. In explaining how the product actually works, the Kickstarter page enthusiastically boasts: "Let's just say it required thousands of hours of CAD design and prototyping. It's a very complex system that has been designed with incredible precision" before launching into the nitty-gritty." Guida and his team are in the process of developing 3-D printed adaptable mounts that allow the Shareroller to be affixed to bike and scooter models beyond the base bike-share design. The group is hoping to raise $100,000 to enable further testing and larger-scale manufacturing. While the goal seems to be to launch in the summer, pledging over $1,995 to the cause now grants you immediate access to beta-version just in time for Vision Zero!