Posts tagged with "CCA":

Celebrating Architectural League Emerging Voices

Timken Lecture Hall, San Francisco Campus

Free and open to the public Reception and book signing to follow discussion More info: architecture@cca.edu

Since 1982, the Architectural League of New York has sponsored Emerging Voices, a juried lecture series recognizing architects, landscape architects, and urban designers whose distinctive voices promise to influence the field of architecture.

This year, the League published 30 Years of Emerging Voices, a survey of honorees with essays interpreting the transformations in architectural discourse, design, and practice that this roster reveals.

Join the conversation by attending this panel discussion featuring principals from all of the Emerging Voices firms currently practicing in the San Francisco Bay Area. Thirteen leading architects and landscape architects will share their current visions for the field and reflect on their practice trajectories in a conversation moderated by Allison Arieff, editorial director at SPUR, and featuring the League’s executive director, Rosalie Genevro, and Emerging Voices program director, Anne Rieselbach. The presenters, many of whom teach at CCA, UC Berkeley, and other schools, are founding principals of some of the Bay Area's most distinguished practices: Anderson Anderson Architecture, Faulders Studio, Fernau & Hartman Architects, Guthrie + Buresh Architects, Iwamoto Scott, Kuth Ranieri Architects, Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects,Ogrydziak Prillinger Architects, Pfau Long Architecture, Rael San Fratello, Stanley Saitowitz | Natoma Architects Inc., SurfaceDesign Inc., and VeeV Design.
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On View> SPUR exhibit tackles illegal housing in San Francisco

Urbanism From Within SPUR 654 Mission Street, San Francisco Through May 1st There's a little over a week left at the exhibition Urbanism From Within put on by the San Francisco Planning & Urban Renewal Association (SPUR), so head over and brace yourself for some captivating research, drawings and peep-show high-jinks along the downtown Mission corridor. Examining San Francisco's housing crisis, the exhibit of student research and drawings, centers on the secondary (in-law) units of the city. The exhibit was organized by Neeraj Bhatia and Christopher Roach of California College of the Arts and the Urban Works Agency. There are currently an estimated 50,000 illegal, secondary units within San Francisco's confines, and the exhibition poses new questions about how such units can connect to the city and its networks to help develop dense and affordable alternatives to the current housing situation. Last March, San Francisco's Planning Commission began supporting a pilot program in the Castro District to legally build secondary units. The exhibit is meticulously laid out in the gallery space, with students' drawings of hypothetical secondary unit typologies attached by clothespins and spaced along a taut wire line. Within the center of the space are two curtained off areas where one looks at finely crafted models through peep holes. The models and curtains speak to the illicit nature of the city's in-law units. The attention to detail, and the focused and nuanced vision, lay out how we can connect the interior to the exterior, and how people in San Francisco and beyond can dream of more spaces to live in.
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Wrapping up CCA’s Data Clay Symposium on combining experimental form with new materials

With the scent of wet St. Louis clay wafting through the air, the Data Clay Symposium kicked off at CCA last weekend. Hosted by the Architecture & Fine Arts Divisions at CCA, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, and the CCA Digital Craft Lab, the event joined architects, artists, designers, makers, critics and creators to discuss and display their latest syncretic experiments and the possibilities of the seemingly disparate mediums of data (i.e. computation) and clay. Moderated and curated by Joshua G. Stein and Del Harrow, and following on the heels of an exhibition on view at the San Francisco's Museum of Craft & Design, the symposium started with a talk by Future Cities Lab co-founder Jason Johnson and his Creative Architecture Machines research group at CCA, exhibiting student work that integrates robotics, interactivity, coding, and clay extrusions manifested in real time. Ron Rael of UC Berkeley and Emerging Objects followed with his research into Earth Architecture and the ancient strategies of clay building. Walking the line between passive building and high-tech computational techniques with his experiments on evaporative cooling bricks, Rael demonstrated the potential of the ancient and the modern coming together in a coherent and cogent architecture of today. Jenny Sabin of Cornell University and Jenny Sabin Studio presented work connecting biology, coding, and material systems that have fostered her experimental practice, which works at the intersection of rapid-prototyping, scientific exploration, and ceramics. With a BFA in Ceramics and a Masters of Architecture, Sabin has been able to integrate and develop a unique space for a practice that radically combines the digital and the analogue. Andy Brayman, a studio potter of the Kansas City–based Matter Factory, presented his unique take on traditional ceramics and data by showing off his knowledge of code and software platforms through his open-sourced self-education and research developments. The morning session came to a close with work presented by UC Berkeley PhD student Laura Devendorf and her playful syntheses of art practice, technology, and research. Her experiments, work at the intersections of a diverse set of disciplines, presenting innovative promise for the "maker" field.
The afternoon featured a keynote by Dries Verbruggen from Antwerp design studio Unfold. Verbruggen’s talk traced the history of digital design, then referenced his book Printing Things, which investigates the myriad techniques and processes of printing. He touched on notions of copying, iteration, and the physics of the physical world gone digital. One of the most intriguing projects of the symposium, on display at the Museum of Craft and Design, is Unfold's recreation of a potter's throwing wheel in digital form, which can be changed through your hands'  interaction.
Bobby Tigerman, associate curator of decorate arts and design at LACMA, followed, channeled remotely from Los Angeles, with a historical look at issues of technology and the hand-made, ending with a note that digital craft is on the rise and has prompted stimulating debate and connected cultures worldwide. From the History of Art and Architecture department at UC Santa Barabara, Assistant Professor Jenni Sorkin expounded on the nature of open source, and the hotly-debated realm of ownership and originality in object-hood. Wrapping up the Symposium was Stephanie Syjuco, a sculptor and Assistant Professor in the Ceramics department at UC Berkeley. She glided through her own work, focused on clay, data, and large scale installations, synthesizing traditional ceramic techniques and digital software such as Cinema 4D. Ending the day was an engaging debate revolving around disciplinary identity, scales and modes of production, the quality and quantity of education, and the ability of the arts, architecture, and design to make a real difference in the world today.
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“Creative Architecture Machines” Dissects Maker Culture at California College of the Arts

On November 2nd a group of architects, builders, students, makers, educators, inventors and designers packed in for the Creative Architecture Machines Colloquium at California College of the Arts. The talk was organized by Jason Kelly Johnson of Future Cities Lab and brought together five practices working at the intersection of fabrication, computation, and making. Johnson led off the evening with an introduction to the practices and ideas behind maker culture; waxing philosophical on digital fabrication, the ubiquity of 3D printers and the future vision of what cutting edge Architecture offices will look like, complete with their own robot arms, of course. Joshua Zabel of Kreysler & Associates followed with some striking imagery and thoughts on new and old projects. Kreysler is fabricating the rippled composite rain screen for the new SFMOMA addition by Snøhetta and has been working at the forefront of composite technology for the past three decades. Andrew Atwood of Atwood-A and First Office traced the development of what we now know as the ubiquitous rendered image and brought with him a series of exploratory and experimental drawings and images that questioned and poked fun at current forms of representation. Returning to the realm of fabrication and material science Ron Rael of Rael-SanFratello and Emerging Objects spoke on the necessity to explore the materials (from pulverized recycled tire rubber to salt) that comprise the radical forms that architects and designers are pushing today. Fedor Novikov of Labori Construction Robotics spoke to the projects that he and his brother Petr are involved with at the IAAC,  involving robots and 3D printed substances. Their dynamic Mataerial project which they have dubbed “anti-gravity object modeling,” allows freeform plastic extruded from a robot arm to attach to virtually any surface as it cures on contact through a chemical process (through the use of thermosetting polymers) within the material instead of less death-defying substances commonly found in 3D printers. Ending the evening were Brandon Kruysman and Jonathan Proto of Bot & Dolly (recently acquired by Google), best known for their role in the Oscar-winning film Gravity. They shared work from their short film Box, which explores the intersection of projection mapping, robotics, and film making and its origins in their experiments at the Robot House at Sci-Arc. The evening concluded with a panel discussion that touched on  intellectual property, open source platforms, behavioral studies, sustainability, and the ethos of technology. The atmosphere remained electric as the speakers and audience compared their notes and predictions for the foreseeable robotic futures that we are surrounded with.
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Going Dutch in SF Next Week

In case you didn't watch the World Cup this year, orange is the official color of the Netherlands. And it's the inspiration for a week of Dutch design events in San Francisco starting on November 14 called Seeing Orange. The week will feature Dutch creativity that includes not just architecture (hi Rem and friends..) but design, fashion, graphic arts, and so on. One of our favorite events is a bike tour (makes sense.. have you ever been to Amsterdam?) of Dutch design highlights led by architect David Baker and urban planner Robert Bregoff. The tour will visit places like My Dutch Bike, which sells handmade Dutch cycles and gear, Hedge Gallery, which features art by Dutch designers, Propeller, showing off sleek Dutch furniture and accessories, and several other destinations. Another highlight: UN Studio founder Caroline Bos will talk with CCA students and faculty about the firm's "Deep Planning" techniques. Sounds mysterious, but great. The full list of events is here. No word yet on whether there will be any of those great Dutch pancakes, but we'll keep you posted..
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SFMOMA Extension: Channeling Your Inner Maya Lin

On Tuesday, SFMOMA will reveal the final contenders for the city's most prestigious project of the moment, the extension of its 1995 Mario Botta building.  But imagine an alternate universe, where an open competition would invite a broad range of concepts from established firms and fresh talent alike. This parallel world could be experienced a couple of weeks ago, during a final review for an architecture class at CCA. Craig Scott of IwamotoScott assigned his students the challenge of designing the new building. For inspiration, they started with two artworks from artists featured in the Fisher collection (e.g., Richard Diebenkorn, Gerhard Richter), and took it from there. The results, presented to a panel that included Joseph Becker, assistant curator of architecture and design at SFMOMA, were quite diverse and offered real insight into the puzzle. Think Project Runway, but for architecture, and you'll have a sense of how the day went. Figuring out where their snazzy new building would connect to the old, fiercely geometric building was one of the bigger conundrums that the students grappled with. Dylan Barlow came up with an intricate, cellular design that connected to the existing structure through its roof garden. This got the thumbs-up from the panel. "It isn't so bad going up through the Botta," said panelist and fellow CCA professor Keith Plymale. "It's getting up to the roof garden and having to come back down through it that's not so great." Barlow also incorporated the drop-off for the W into his scheme, envisioning it as a drive-through gallery that would give hotel guests a sneak peek at the collection. A more aggressive "intervention" was proposed by Michael Wlosek, who dropped a new top floor on the old building, leaving the top of the Botta oculus peering out like a periscope. Inside, the striped walls of the oculus functioned as a sort of art piece. There were also clear sightlines through the museum to the new space behind, which solved one particular problem. The tricky infill site, coupled with the extensive additional space that the museum is calling for--100,000 square feet of galleries and 40,000 square feet of back office--meant that some of these architectural models looked a bit like cardboard Napoleon pastry. Pedro Marugan's refined model showed how everything might fit together. The new extension will have a narrow street presence, replacing the firehouse on Howard St. The architect's standard imperative--maximize natural light, create a sense of transparency--battles with the museum's need to protect artwork and hermetically sealed environments. Annie Aldrich made a virtue out of that necessity with a canyon-like entrance that keeps the facade fairly monolithic. Inside, the interior opens up with shafts of light coming through jagged skylights. At the end of the day, I had a renewed appreciation for the difficulties for the task at hand, as well as for the creativity on display. What if the general public was presented with the challenge of designing the extension, if only as a fun exercise? That many more people would have a better appreciation of what it is that architects do.  It would at once demystify architecture, but increase awareness of it. And it just might make us demand more out of our built environments.
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City Stunts

A new exhibition at the Graham Foundation’s Madlener House puts urban residents on notice: engage your community, become amateur planners, designers, and architects. Actions: What You Can Do with the City was organized and curated by the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal and seeks to challenge traditional planning’s organization of the built environment into work, residential, and leisure zones. The exhibition is composed of 99 actions, "common activities such as walking, playing, recycling, and gardening that are pushed beyond their usual definition by the international architects, artists, and collectives featured in the exhibition.” The actions range from cheeky solutions to lying down on hostile benches (Action #38) to sensible maps of how and where to forage for urban fruits and vegetables (Action #9). City dwellers often come up against barriers – often by design (e.g. anti-sitting devices, Action #43) – to full enjoyment of their surroundings. The resulting friction is pervasive throughout the show. The actions not only propose alternatives or means around the impediments, but sometimes heighten the dialogue by suggesting new ones. On the same table sit decorative metal skateboarding-deterrent starfish (Action #42) and shoes modified with plastic cutting boards (Action #30) that allow pedestrians to slide on hard edges and railings. One item is designed to curb pedestrian damage, while the other encourages movement on unintended surfaces. These seemingly contradictory ideas and other actions challenge our thinking on urban environments and inspire greater engagement and participation. Actions: What You Can Do with the City Graham Foundation 4 W. Burton Place, Chicago Through March 13, 2010