Posts tagged with "Cape Cod":

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Product> Hot Stuff for Kitchens & Baths

Assertive style and high performance are characteristic qualities in the latest crop of new products and collections for the kitchen and bath. Often drawing on designs of the past, they nonetheless present an advanced aesthetic. La Cornue W La Cornue The W line dramatically re-envisions cooking appliances. The collection includes a freestanding “oven tower”, an induction “table” with four burners, and a ventilation hood, as well as an armoire-type cabinet and work table of oiled oak. The components are contemporary, yet maintain certain hallmark details of La Cornue, such as the control knobs and the towel bar that runs the length of the cooktop. Designed by Jean-Michel Wilmotte.   Urban Kitchen SieMatic With its mix of stylistic elements, the Urban design theme reflects the contrasts and vitality of city living. Central to the program is the SieMatic 29 sideboard; its mitered and rounded side panels and gently curved pedestal are a contemporary update of the traditional piece of furniture. It is complemented by a variety of freestanding cabinet units, featuring open shelving, cupboards, and drawers.   Cape Cod Bath Collection Duravit Part of the Cape Cod suite of bathroom furnishings and fixtures, this console vanity uses a simple palette of materials in an expressive way. The frame is rendered in cool, smooth chrome, while the cabinet boxes and horizontal surfaces are offered in a choice of high gloss white, as well as four wood finishes: American walnut, European oak, vintage oak, and white beech. The vintage oak model brings an extra touch of nature into the bathroom as its countertop features an irregular live edge, making each piece of furniture unique. Designed by Philippe Starck.   Black Steel Finish MGS Select products in the MGS MB Bath Collections are now available in Black Steel, a matte black finish for solid stainless steel fittings. Shown on the MB282 widespread three-hole faucet, Black Steel has a refined yet edgy appearance. Unlike a powder-coat or electroplated finish, Black Steel is produced using Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD), a process used in aerospace, military, and high-tech industries. Through PVD, the color actually penetrates the metal, resulting in a smooth, durable finish that is consistent throughout every component of the faucet design.   ILBAGNOALESSI One Laufen One element of a complete collection of fixtures and fittings, the ILBAGNOALESSI One water closet is available in both floor- and wall-mount models. WaterSense certified, the dual-flush fixture features LAUFEN Clean Coat, a glaze-in-glaze finish that ensures dirt and bacteria are easily rinsed away. Designed by Stefano Giovanni, in cooperation with Alessi and Laufen.   Henrybuilt Henrybuilt kitchens combine the integrated design and functionality of a “system” kitchen with the flexibility and personalization associated with custom-designed rooms. Spaces that are refined without being overtly precious, and that are technically sophisticated—without being cold or difficult to maintain—are the result of an individually focused design process.
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Organization Rescues Cape Cod Modernist Homes

Built in 1970 by prolific Cape Cod–based architect Charles Zehnder, the Frank Lloyd Wright–inspired Kugel Gips house spent nearly a decade unoccupied and in disrepair while under ownership of the National Park Service (NPS). Abandoned and rotting, the compact Modernist home was nearly lost to the idyllic peninsula’s salty winds, and worse yet, the wrecking ball, until Wellfleet, Massachusetts–based architect Peter McMahon and the Cape Cod Modernist Trust (CCMT) stepped in. As part of their mission to preserve and document the Cape’s rich Modernist heritage—a legacy of 80 homes by local and European-born architects like Marcel Breuer, Serge Chermayeff and Nathaniel Saltonstall—McMahon and a group of around 35 volunteers have faithfully restored the house, opening it up to visitors, vacationers, scholars, and artists. Following the outbreak of World War II and their subsequent migration to New England, seminal Bauhaus figures like Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer were drawn to Cape Cod by its pristine natural environment, cheap, undeveloped land, and the open minds of the local artistic and architectural community. On parcels costing as little as $1,000, architects constructed simple, experimental summer cottages with budget materials and intimate connections to their natural surroundings. “The designs were very intentional,” CCMT founder McMahon told the Boston Globe in 2009. “There’s a lifestyle implied by these buildings, one that recognizes the importance of nature, creativity, and sustainability, one that says you don’t need a lot to be happy” Featuring a large cantilevered roof, exposed concrete, wood shingles, two decks and gracious windows overlooking a nearby kettle pond, the 2,200-square-foot, three-bedroom house is the first restoration undertaken by the CCMT. Commissioned by Peter and Judy Kugel, both Boston academics, the house was built within the boundaries of the Cape Cod National Seashore and in 1998 was acquired through eminent domain by the NPS for $80,000 before falling into disrepair. Thanks to a generous $100,000 contribution from the town of Wellfleet and the pro bono services of Manhattan based Fox Diehl Architects, along with the sweat of McMahon and his volunteers, the home now looks as good as it did 43 years ago. Seven such Modernist homes are owned by the NPS, five of which were in poor condition and scheduled for demolition before the Massachusetts Historical Commission deemed them significant specimens of postwar Modern residential architecture. The CCMT has since acquired long term leases on the five properties and plans to make them available for educational programs, summer rentals, and scholar and artist residencies. Over the summer, the CCMT completed renovations of the Jack Hall-designed Hatch cottage, and in October the organization raised over $60,000 via Kickstarter for the restoration of the Weidlinger house, designed Hungarian Modernist Paul Weidlinger. According to the CCMT, Gropius, Breuer, and Le Corbusier all weighed in on Weidlinger's design, with Corbusier reportedly commenting "don't pave the driveway." But it is not the publicly owned properties that are in real danger. Times have changed and land prices have escalated since Breuer built his pair of houses on the Cape for $5,000 each. For many would-be residents, the modest scale and off-the-shelf materials of these mid-century relics are not worth saving when a beachside McMansion would fit nicely in their place.