Posts tagged with "Burning Man":

In upstate New York, a DMT-inspired psychedelic temple rises

Tucked away on a tree-studded, 40-acre plot just a quarter mile from the Hudson River, one of New York’s most unusual construction projects is underway. The Chapel of Sacred Mirrors (CoSM)—a transdenominational church and registered nonprofit—has been constructing the Entheon: “A place to discover god within.” The three-story windowless art space will be a temple to, among other things, original “visionary art” from the church’s husband-and-wife co-founders, Alex and Allyson Grey. The couple, who have been together since first meeting (and dropping acid) in 1975, previously ran an art space in Manhattan. After closing down their Chelsea outpost in 2009, Alex and Allyson moved upstate, where they have been running their collective and a psychedelic variant of a bed-and-breakfast. Their Wappingers Falls location hosts monthly full-moon festivities, as well as large concerts and events. Placing art at the very center of their faith, the estate already features large-scale architectural artworks, such as the three-story gazebo-temple Altered States made by artist Kate Raudenbush, who describes herself as “New York-based, Burning Man–bred.” Alex Grey is perhaps best known for his hyper-detailed paintings of human bodies set on trippy backgrounds that reveal the figures’ underlying circulatory systems, musculature, and spiritual meridian points through translucent skin. Grey's audience has not been limited to a cult following of the chemically inclined; he exhibited at the New Museum in 1986. For members of CoSM, visionary art is at the center of their cosmology—like pre-iconoclastic medieval clerics, they understand art not just as a gateway to the divine, but as the manifestation of the divine itself. It’s only natural that this artist-pastor couple would need to build a sanctuary for creativity. Selecting a point on their 40-acre plot that aligns with the solar plexus of a projected goddess, “the kabbalistic sephirot of justice,” CoSM has begun converting a former carriage house into a three-level, 12,000-square-foot concrete structure replete with modern amenities, including an ADA-compliant elevator. As with the foundation of the Greys’ relationship and their church, psychedelics and entactogens play a central role in the eccentric design of the Entheon. It was, in fact, a (then legal) shared MDMA experience that showed the Greys they should not sell their work, but rather build a chapel to share it with a “worldwide love tribe.” Though currently a bare concrete structure, there are big plans for the Entheon. Highly detailed renderings by Ryan Tottle (an Academy Award-winning animator who has worked on major films such as Disney’s Frozen) promise an architecturally complex and spiritually rich exterior. The proposed building is a veritable mythological bestiary. Four-faced ancient-Egypt-inspired “Soulbirds” guard one door. Another door features a design that returns Adam and Eve to the Garden of Eden. Winged “Angels of the Creative Imagination” punctuate the facade, interspersed between the larger “Godheads” that comprise the bulk of the outer walls. These Godheads “bear symbols of different world-wisdom traditions above each Cosmic Eye.” “DNA dragons” rise up from the corners of the roof to its center—liquid and vibrating creatures whose sides are a continuous double helix, a form that, according to a likely false urban legend, was discovered by British molecular biologist Francis Crick under the influence of LSD. Allyson’s “secret writing,” a script using a 20-letter unpronounceable alphabet, will run the upper edge of the Entheon and be guarded by sculpted “Angels of the Four Directions.” And these are just some of the building’s creatures and spiritual guardians. The roof—trypophobes beware—is a concentric array of eyes; called “Collective Vision,” the imagery inspired by a DMT experience of Alex’s that Allyson had the insight to suggest as a roof pattern, a “canopy of consciousness.” As a free e-book on the Entheon points out, “Collective Vision” is a visual motif that has appeared in the graphics and on the stage sets of “America’s number one cult band, Tool.” The collective hopes to use cast concrete, 3-D printing, and other technologies to realize this energetic facade. The three-level interior of the Entheon is intended to be equally elaborate. Through the ornate gold doors there will be, among other spaces, a Chapel of Sacred Mirrors, with its Gothic-style arches; the All One gallery; a museum shop; and a reliquary room featuring the spectacles of the first person to both synthesize and take LSD, Swiss scientist Albert Hoffman, and the ashes of the legendary Harvard professor and psychedelic evangelist Timothy Leary. Leary’s famous Millbrook mansion, the site of so much psychonautic exploration, is just over 20 miles away from CoSM’s own estate. Fundraising for the Entheon continues. The first cycle of fundraising began in 2013 (plans to build began around 2012). According to its website, the church has raised $2.3 million so far. For devotees, the Entheon is the logical next step in their faith of art and love. As Alex told Mushroom Magazine in July 2015, “We believe the inevitable consequence of love is the building of temples.”

Burning Man goes to D.C. with new show at the Smithsonian Museum

The psychedelic stylings of Burning Man will be reaching a wider audience with the installation of No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C. Visitors can enjoy photographs, sculptures, and interactive installations from the annual festival, usually just ephemera, only a stones-throw away from the White House. The challenges of translating a massive outdoor festival (where sculptures are designed to be burnt to the ground at the end) to a museum setting wasn’t lost on the curators. Art cars and sculptures, some originally on display on the Playa and others commissioned for the show, jewelry, and even experiences­–through VR–in an institutional setting reveals an underlying tension between the disposable, freewheeling nature of Burning Man and the typically more stoic nature of museum exhibitions. Large-scale installations in the gallery form the heart of the show, but the Renwick has partnered with Golden Triangle Business Improvement District to spread six outdoor pieces throughout the neighborhood. From March 30 through December 2018, residents can spy: No Spectators will put multiple large installations front and center, many of which were commissioned specifically for the show, including a temple from sculptor David Best. Despite taking place in the middle of Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, Burning Man has always had a heavy architectural and planning component to the festivities. Technically complicated pavilions and temples go up every year, such as 2018’s digitally fabricated Galaxia, and the temporary city that houses 70,000 residents every year serves as a proving ground for radical urban planning ideas. No Spectators sprung partially from the desire to spread the Burning Man gospel, as organizers admit to the Times, as well as the opportunity to tap a wellspring of previously un-exhibited work. For the Smithsonian’s part, the museum has committed to upholding the festivals’ ideals, having kept corporate logos away from the art, hiring local “burners” to help patrons appreciate the pieces, and commissioning a history of the festival to contextualize the works. No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man will run from March 30 through January of 2019.

Burning Man’s 2018 temple revealed

Burning Man, a summer festival located in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, is something of an architectural bonanza. Each year, dozens of artistic displays and sculptural forms are erected in Black Rock City, the temporary metropolis that hosts the festival. Temples in the past have included a wide range of designs, from pagoda-inspired structures to Wicker Man-eqsue towers. Galaxia, designed by architect Arthur Mamou-Mani a professor at the University of Westminster and the owner of the fabrication laboratory Fab.Pub, has been selected to serve as Burning Man 2018’s main temple. The temple will be constructed of twenty spiraling timber trusses, crowned with a 3-D-printed mandala. A series of alcoves are formed between the timber trusses, allowing spaces of congregation for attendees. According to the Burning Man Journal, the distance between the timber trusses will be wide enough to facilitate movement to the core of the structure. The Galaxia structure “celebrates hope in the unknown, stars, planets, black holes, the movement uniting us in the swirling galaxies of dreams”–a description fitting for the international designs of the festival as well as the broad scope of its attendance. The architect, Arthur Mamou-Mani, has designed installations in Black Rock City for the last six years. Based in London, Mamou-Mani specializes in digitally designed and fabricated architecture. As reported in the Reno Gazette Journal, the 2018 temple will be pre-fabricated and mostly built off-site as a collaboration between a crew of artists using a range of robotic tools such as 3-D printers, laser cutters and robotic drill arms. Through this digital fabrication process, Mamou-Mani hopes to reestablish the architect as craftsman, allowing for a closer connection between the design and construction processes. Shipping the interstellar structure will also prove to be quite a feat, requiring the use of flatbed trucks to transport them to the center of Black Rock City. Regardless of the architectural and engineering efforts going into the Galaxia, the structure is nonetheless temporary and will go up in flames on the last night of the festival, in accordance with Burning Man principles.

AN’s top five picks for this week’s news

Missed some of our articles, tweets, or Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Gehry Partners to design Extreme Model Railroad Museum in Massachusetts The firm is replacing Gluckman Tang as architects of the Extreme Model Railroad Museum and Contemporary Architecture Museum in North Adams, Massachusetts. What happened to speculation in architecture? Architects are not really thinking about new ways of living and relating to the world outside of our own history and discourse. What happened? Gorge yourself on Burning Man's annual exhibition of weird and wonderful architecture The Architect's Newspaper takes a look at the best art and architecture at Burning Man. The 2017 edition of the desert gathering kicked off this week.. Thanks to big data, all architects will face a major professional crossroads bigger than CAD or BIM Should we architects cede our authority to algorithms, it’s likely we’ll lose all control and influence over the forces that reduce great design to mediocrity. Irishtown Bend in Cleveland could be in line for a massive transformation Cleveland non-profit LAND studio and CMG Landscape Architects are proposing radical changes to Irishtown Bend in Cleveland, Ohio. Jenny Sabin's selling furniture from her MoMA PS1 installation Well, we lied. There's actually six top news items today, because we just couldn't resist this: Jenny Sabin Studio's "spool stools," the seating for Sabin's MoMA PS1's Warm Up installation, are now available for purchase. Prices start at $150.

Gorge yourself on Burning Man’s annual exhibition of weird and wonderful architecture

It's that time of year again. The time when scantily clad, goggle-wearing Instagrammers take to the Black Rock Desert in Nevada and post pictures of the exotic sculpture that populates the central area, commonly known as the playa. This year's theme for participants was "Radical Ritual." The festival officially started today and as always, there is a wealth of whacky art to feast upon, all of which ranges in scale and eccentricity. Notable installations include: Tree of Ténéré by California foursome Alexander Green, Mark Slee, Zachary Smith, and Patrick Deegan, a 32-foot-tall tree made from 25,000 leaves and 170,000 LEDs that reacts to biorhythmic and sound; Gummie Bear Mandala Pyramid by Long Beach artist Karla DelCarpio, which is made from 100,000 hand-cast gummy bears and rises to 12 feet; and Zachary Coffin's  Temple of Gravity, a returning installation that encourages visitors to climb on hanging rocks. Images of these, and more can all be found below. A full list of the 2017 Black Rock City honoraria recipients can be found here.  
 

A post shared by Salomon Cohen (@salocohenvr) on

 
 
 

A post shared by Zentue (@zentue) on

 

A post shared by Mandy (@whatifwego) on

 

A post shared by Haley Rene (@haley_rene) on

 
 

A post shared by Amanda Whalen (@_killerwhalen_) on

   

A post shared by Caro (@carolinagalle) on

 

A post shared by Aluna (@alunaburningman) on

 
 

Take a look at the best of Burning Man 2016

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN) was posting images all last week from Burning Man, the yearly festival that takes place in the Nevada desert (see our highlights from the opening and the third day in). AN was represented by Andrew Krebs of SOM’s Los Angeles office; he’s been supplying us with images and videos. These images can be found in our coverage of the week. Here is an Instagram roundup of some of the most intriguing installations and designs that were present at this year's festival.

A photo posted by Junior (@tahoepinup) on

A photo posted by Burner 4 Life )'( (@jeucey) on

A photo posted by Jessie Rethman (@sonnet_714) on

A photo posted by Nuriel Molcho (@nurielmolcho) on

A photo posted by asyabutler (@asyabutler) on

A photo posted by fredd'o (@fredrikow) on

A photo posted by @lavidafallera on
A photo posted by LensCulture (@lensculture) on
A photo posted by Nuriel Molcho (@nurielmolcho) on
A photo posted by @artofinteriors on
A photo posted by Grosscup (@sgrosscup) on
  https://youtu.be/bfPdFzkPqmU?t=24s  

AN’s highlights from day five of Burning Man

The Architect's Newspaper (AN) will be posting images all week from Burning Man, now underway in the Nevada desert (see our highlights from the opening and the third day in). AN is being represented by Andrew Krebs of SOM's Los Angeles office; he's been supplying us with images and videos. Scroll down to see more from Instagram! We'll post more as we receive updates.
#burningman2016 #westcoastisthebestcoast #temple2016 A photo posted by @cmtomasetti on

#home #burningman #burningman2016 #blackrockcity #photography #photographer #photooftheday

A photo posted by @burningmanfestival on

Made it to the coffee! @burningman #burningman2016 A photo posted by Kristi Keno (@kkenooo) on

It's even better than I thought possible... #lighthouse #burningman #burningman2016 #art #blackrockcity #brc #love

A photo posted by Michael Holden (@michael.holden.photographer) on

AN’s highlights from day three of Burning Man

The Architect's Newspaper (AN) will be posting images all week from Burning Man, now underway in the Nevada desert (see our highlights from the opening). AN is being represented by Andrew Krebs of SOM's Los Angeles office; he's been supplying us with images and videos. Scroll down to see more from Instagram! We'll post more as we receive updates.  

The temple #blackrockcity #burningman2016

A photo posted by Christine Kim (@chr.kim) on

#burningman #happyburn #welcomehome #burningman2016 A photo posted by Kos (@firekos) on

The amazing places a sand storm can lead you to 💨

A photo posted by Vanessa Adao (@acasadava) on

I'm going to take my bike and ride thru these rings. LOL #burningman2016 A photo posted by Henry Park (@henrypark74) on

Landed

A photo posted by HYBYCOZO (@hybycozo) on

AN’s highlights from the opening of Burning Man

The Architect's Newspaper (AN) will be posting images all week from Burning Man, which just started in the Nevada desert. AN is being represented by Andrew Krebs of SOM's Los Angeles office; he's been supplying us with images and videos. Scroll down to see more! We'll post more as we receive updates. Other highlights from Instagram:

Tangential dreams 👌🏻

A photo posted by Hamish Macpherson (@hmacpherson77) on

#burningman #burningman2016 #blackrockcity #hyperlapse A video posted by Burning Man Videos Curated (@burner_videos) on

Burning Man Festival buys 3,800-acre swath of Nevada

For those feeling the Bern with nowhere to go, have you ever considered the Nevada desert?

Well, you should, because Burning Man Festival recently purchased the 3,800-acre Fly Ranch, a not-too-shabby swath of desert in Nevada’s far western Washoe County. The nonprofit art group announced the news via blog post: “As a year-round site, Fly Ranch has the potential to expand Burning Man Project’s activities and existing programs, as well as amplify Burning Man’s cultural impact into the wider world beyond Black Rock City.”

Pack your bags and bring your face paint because the desert is about to get pretty cool, man.

An architecture course built around Burning Man and students finding ways to fund their projects

Each year, the Burning Man festival held in the Black Rock desert of Nevada attracts fantastical sculptures of all shapes and sizes. Joshua Potter, a fifth year student at the University of Westminster in London, is hoping that his structure "PURSUIT" will make to this years festival. Part of his studio assignment, PURSUIT follows a parametric approach—and an emphasis on self-reliance to fund student projects—that has become synonymous with his studio unit. Run by tutors Arthur Mamou-Mani and Toby Burgess, the studio, named DS10, has garnered a strong pedigree for complex designs. However, DS10's primary approach, according to Potter is about producing "happy and fun" architecture that also relies on rigorous testing such as model making and digital fabrication. “The studio's philosophy is to involve students as much as possible in the design, fabrication and construction process" the two said. "We chose Burning Man for its ten guiding principles which include ‘Radical Self-Reliance,’ ‘Radical Self-Expression,’ ‘Leave no trace,’ and ‘communal effort.’ This meant playful and climbable structures, fully built by us as a team in a way that wouldn't harm the local environment.” Within the past five years, DS10 has submitted over 80 projects to the Global Arts Grant of Burning Man. As a result, six proposals have been provided funding through the scheme, notably Fractal Cult and Shipwreck constructed in 2013 and Hayam in 2014. Students are heavily encouraged to seek funding for their projects either through the Global Arts Grant or Kickstarter, to see their projects realized. "They try and make it a lot of fun, but it's a lot of work!" said Potter, who also added that DS10's ethos has taught many students, including himself about being independent and self reliant. His project brief, meanwhile, called for a project that could respond to a social agenda, through a set of parameters. As a result, PURSUIT was born. Deriving from a mathematical theory known as "pursuit curvature," a system that relies on inputs and thresholds. Potter used the shape of an arrowhead and formed the idea of six arrowheads pointing towards the center. Using the this algorithmically, an iterative process forces certain points to move in accordance with each other. "With Pursuit Curvature, each point starts at a unique position of a polygon, and moves incrementally towards the nearest adjacent point until they all converge in the centre. The path travelled is directly influenced by the points around it, so the final curves represent the effects all of the points have on one another as a group," he explains. On his Kickstarter page, he goes on to say that his project "celebrates humanity's ongoing quest for Peace, Freedom and Joy - in Life, Love and Art" aiming to "create an interactive and unique sculptural playground for visitors."
  The design forms three interconnected spaces that offer unique perspectives of their surrounding and interior spatial arrangements. Potter adds that this encourages "playful interaction" and allows visitors to climb up the and around the structure while also providing a "space for personal reflection and communal gathering." If Potter's $25,575 dream is realized, PURSUIT will be burnt to the ground when Burning Man is over, perhaps symbolizing the final end of the "pursuit."

Here are ten beautiful views of pop-up architecture (and Bjarke Ingels) from the 2015 Burning Man Festival

As the Burning Man festival comes to a close, here's a look at what pop-up architecture was exhibited at the Black Rock site in Nevada. Attracting a diverse audience including an unwelcome plague of insects, Burning Man closed on Labor Day. During the festival, it has almost become expected to find many weird and wondrous sculptures and art installations ranging from psychedelic letterforms to giant wireframe naked statues by the likes of Marco Cochrane. Architect Bjarke Ingels was also on the scene wearing some very steampunk goggles. Take a look at ten of our favorite images found on Instagram of the annual festival. https://instagram.com/p/7dkxG5QSKz/ https://instagram.com/p/7ZBc0tLZQs/ https://instagram.com/p/7ZAYx7rZe4/ https://instagram.com/p/7WI6itLZf1/ https://instagram.com/p/7djMFgsX_Z/ https://instagram.com/p/7diw7Cxrku/ https://instagram.com/p/7dgdTKGWm3/ https://instagram.com/p/7Yx4Eiqb45/ https://instagram.com/p/7difXMqb7d/ https://instagram.com/p/7ZAOEBLZeh/