Posts tagged with "Brooklyn Bridge":

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This is how the DOT could turn the Brooklyn Bridge into “Times Square in the Sky”

For both cyclists and pedestrians, traveling across the Brooklyn Bridge is far from a pleasant affair. Squeezing onto a ten-foot-wide (17 feet at its widest) elevated path intended for shared use may no longer be viable as the bridge becomes a destination in its own right and not just a piece of infrastructure. In light of this, the New York City Department of Transport (DOT) is looking into creating a "Times Square in the Sky," an expanded pathway thats accommodates more foot traffic. As complaints mount, the DOT seems prepared to take action. “We’ve decided the time has come,” New York's Transportation Commissioner Polly Trottenberg told the New York Times. “We want to think in a deep, thoughtful way about the next evolution of the bridge.” The resulting plan, dramatically titled "Times Square in the Sky," looks to widen the pathway used by non-vehicle travelers on the bridge. As its name suggests, the project acknowledges the bridge's role as a place to visit as many tourists stop to take photographs of the views it offers as well as the structure itself. In addition to this, the bridge is also uses as a place for sitting, talking, performing, as well as selling and buying goods. In its study of the bridge, the DOT notes that its narrowest point is also conveniently a hotspot for picture taking. The DOT suggests a central bike path, protected by railing or barriers to create dedicated cycle lanes going in each direction with pedestrian walkways on either side. This would take advantage of the un-used promenade space between the two towers. As for the approaches to the bridge, two options have been put forward: A short range plan to "reallocate existing even split between bikes and pedestrians to 10 feet for pedestrians and 7 feet for bikes" and a "seasonal fence to reduce conflicts," as well as a long range plan to build elevated cantilevered walking spaces. Pinch points around the staircases are alos recognized and targeted for remediation. Controls and crossings to manage speed and different uses would be located at the Brooklyn end, while the DOT would "explore the feasibility of closing and covering the stairway" on the Manhattan side. For now, the DOT's next course of action is to go ahead with a consultant study, running through to February of next year and to be carried out by AECOM. This will include structural analysis, conceptual design development, historical preservation implication study, and a conceptual cost estimate.
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VIDEO> Repairing and Replacing Two New York City Region Bridges

Bridges. They can be grand and majestic, awe-inspiring symbols of engineering ingenuity, city-defining pieces of infrastructure, and, as you may have heard by now, at serious risk of collapsing. To stop that from happening, engineers basically have two options: repair or replace. Both of those strategies are currently pursued in the New York City region. As the New York Times explains in a new video, the Tappan Zee Bridge was in such bad shape that it made more sense to just build a new bridge right next to it at the cost $3.9 billion. When complete, the new structure will have express bus lanes, and a bike and pedestrian pathway. Now, obviously, the Brooklyn Bridge isn't going anywhere, but the aging icon does need to have some work done. Instead of replacing the structure, the bridge has remained open while construction crews have been reconstructing its ramps and approaches, replacing 600 bridge bearings, and removing lead paint.
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Proposal Could Triple Pedestrian Space on the Brooklyn Bridge

Every day, an average 4,000 pedestrians and 3,100 cyclists cross the upper-level pathway of the Brooklyn Bridge. Commuters, tourists, and joggers vie for space on the congested path, whose width varies from 16 feet to as little as 8 feet—creating a bottleneck for two-way bike traffic. For years observers have recounted harrowing tales of near collisions on the overcrowded span, like the bike-phobic Post pitting reckless cyclists against merely oblivious tourists and the Times calling for the appropriation of a traffic lane for bike use. But now a proposal to double the width of the path could offer a solution to the overcrowding. The answer to this conflict is expansion, according to three City Council members from districts adjacent the Bridge: Margaret Chin representing Lower Manhattan and Brad Lander and Stephen Levin representing the Brooklyn waterfront from Greenpoint through Carroll Gardens. “As the lower Manhattan and Brownstone Brooklyn communities continue to grow, the Brooklyn Bridge is becoming an increasingly vital connection,” council member Chin wrote in a statement. “We must ensure this historic destination is equipped to handle our city’s growing transportation demands.” Currently the pathway widens as it passes around the iconic bridge towers supporting the bridge's suspension cables, extending over the innermost traffic lanes below. The council members propose widening the entire pathway to that width, creating a dedicated bike lane on the northern side and an additional pedestrian lane on the south side, thus tripling pedestrian capacity. The proposal has not yet been discussed with designers or engineers, and council member Levin suggested a design competition to create a more refined plan. No budget or plans for funding have been established and no timeframe has been set for such a project. The council members suggest that it could be integrated with current plans for a redesign of the approach at Tillary Street on the Brooklyn side of the bridge, which currently leaves pedestrians and cyclists to pile up in the middle of the road waiting for a crosswalk. Increased capacity will also demand a redesign of the Manhattan approach, as bottlenecking already creates congestion there as well. Any alterations to the bridge will require the approval of city preservationists, as the main span is a city-designated landmark, a national historic landmark, and a national historic civil engineering landmark. Modification would not be unprecedented, however, as the original trolley and railways were removed from the bridge in the 1950s.
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Quick Clicks> Backtracking Bridges, Library Life, Crowd-Sourcing, and an Architecture Queen

Bridge Backtracks. Brownstoner uncovered the above historic view of the Brooklyn Bridge in 1903 back when transit and pedestrians dominated its traffic flow. StreetsBlog also noticed that the bridge has lost quite a bit of capacity as trains were removed in favor of cars (down significantly from its 1907 peak of 426,000 crossings a day). Also be sure to check out the super-high-res photo over at shorpy.com. Library Life. Robert Dawson lamented, "These are brutal times for public libraries," in a piece for Design Observer. With funding in short supply, he argued that the library is more than a room full of books, but a true "American Commons." Crowd-Sourced. The Institute for Urban Design is prepping for the first annual Urban Design Week this September with a crowd-sourced assignment to improve New York City. Running through April 30 and called By the City / For the City, you're invited to share your ideas via this handy online form. (via Polis.) Architecture Queen. The Philippine Star reports that newly registered architect Shamcey Supsup was crowned Miss Universe-Philippines. The magna cum laude graduate of the University of the Philippines won over 39 other (non-architect) contestants. Supsup's next stop is Sao Paulo, Brazil where she will take on the world, T-square in hand. (via Archinect.)
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Skin Condition

Putting the Verizon building behind bars—and plans for its recladding on ice. (StartAgain/Flickr) It looks like one of New York's ugliest buildings may also have turned out to be one of its naughtiest. The exchange place at 375 Pearl Street is reviled by many, including tall buildings expert and AN pal Carol Willis, thanks to its blank sides and besmirching of our Brooklyn Bridge panoramas. Fortunately, plans were in the works to have Cook + Fox reclad the building and turn it into something more befitting of an increasingly polished downtown, not unlike the recent transformation of another former phone exchanger across from Bryan Park, 1095 Avenue of the Americas. But that could all come tumbling down thanks to some long—or is it tall—overdue taxes. A rendering shows Cook + Fox's proposal to transform the building into something more palatable for developer Taconic Properties. (Courtesy Cook + Fox) Curbed sounded the alarm about a report in the Tribeca Trib that details some serious zoning and tax violations stretching back to when the building was first drawn up in 1972. Apparently, when the exchange place—basically floor upon floor of telephone connections—was constructed by New York Telephone, it added hundreds of thousands of square feet more than it promised in its deal with the city, from whom it bought the land for $17 million at the time. Had it not been for the 2007 sale of 29 of the building's 32 floors to Taconic Development, and the developer's subsequent advertisement of the missing square footage, the city might never have realized. But now, they're suing Verizon and the developer—the city alleges Taconic was complicit, given its below-market-rate price for the floors—for $53 million plus interest. And if that were not enough to kill the reclad, there's an injunction on any construction work taking place at the building until the case is resolved.