Posts tagged with "Bronx Museum":

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Bronx Museum announces Gordon Matta-Clark exhibition

The Bronx Museum has just announced it will stage an exhibition on Gordon Matta-Clark and his work in and around the Bronx. The exhibit Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitecture will examine “the artist’s pioneering social, relational, and activist” work. There have been scores of Matta-Clark exhibits, but few connect the artist's work to the underserved and troubled urban landscape of the 1970s and his activist approach. The museum has a distinguished history—under its Director, Holly Block, and Principal Curator, Sergio Bessa—of highlighting the borough's urban history and its often neglected importance to the art of the city and the moments of artistic joy that often spring from its rocky soil. Matta-Clark is the perfect artist to pair with the Bronx Museum’s mandate to not just highlight the borough's urban history but to highlight activist solutions by artists and architects. The exhibit will run from November 2017 to January 2018. For more on the Bronx Museum, see its website here.
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Tuesday> Reception at the Bronx Museum’s “Beyond the Supersquare” exhibition

Beyond the Supersquare: Art and Architecture in Latin America After Modernism at the Bronx Museum is the most exciting and challenging architecture and urbanism exhibit in New York at the moment. The focus of the exhibit is the influence modern architecture and architectural thought has had on contemporary art in the Caribbean and Latin America. But while it features the work of artists and not primarily architects, all the works selected by Bronx Museum Executive Director Holly Block and Independent Curator María Inés Rodriguez were chosen for their insights into architecture and the immediate challenges of the region's exploding urbanism. supersquare2 In addition the museum has commissioned artist Terence Gower to create SuperPuesto, a colorful outdoor temporary pavilion that creates a modernist space in which visitors can immerse themselves in the themes highlighted in the show. The Architect's Newspaper, along with New York architects Carlos Brillembourg and Belmont Freeman, both of whom have personal and professional roots in the region, will host a reception at the museum this Tuesday, September 16 from 6–8:00p.m. We will also walk across the Grand Concourse and visit Superpuesta and meet the artist, Terence Gower. View more images from the exhibition in AN's recent Portfolio piece here.
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Flowers and Recycled Planters Transform a Step Street in the Bronx

A formal dedication for a creative urban intervention called ARTfarm brings flowers and greenery to a formerly barren step street in the Bronx.  Architects Valeria Bianco, Christian Gonsalves, Shagun Singh, and Justin Taylor designed and built the project  with help from Architecture for Humanity and the Bronx Museum of the Arts. Drawing inspiration from a nearby farmers' market, ARTfarm recycles wooden cabinet doors and crates into 59 planters for a variety of plants and transforms a concrete and stone stairway into a lush tiered garden. ARTfarm received $5,000 in funding from the New York Department of Transportation Art Program, pARTners.  The program seeks to transform New York's public realm through art and design to create a safer, more inviting streetscape. “From concrete step streets to chain link fences on ordinary street corners, we’re bringing art to streetscapes citywide to redefine these in-between spaces,” said Commissioner Sadik-Khan in a release. “With the help of our local partners, New Yorkers are rediscovering slices of neighborhoods near and far through colorful artwork that makes these places more attractive, welcoming destinations for everyone.” ARTfarm was built by local school children, community residents, and Architecture for Humanity volunteers and will be in place for eleven months.  The installation is located on Step Street at 165th Street and Carroll Place in the Bronx.
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Acconci Gets In on the Ground Floor

What do kitchen counter tops, shower-wall cladding, and the Grand Concourse have in common? Corian, of course. Thanks to performance-artist-turned-designer (and Bronx native) Vito Acconci and Acconci Studio designers Adam Jakubowski and Bradley Rothenberg, the Bronx Museum can now boast its very own DuPont fabricated sculpture. Acconci’s large, porous installation is titled Lobby-For-The-Time-Being and provides an imaginative, fabric-like reconsideration of the now ubiquitous polymer, originally developed in 1967 to replace human bones. In what seems like the most recent installment in a worldwide series of Corian-centric, site-specific sculpture, Lobby-For-The-Time-Being incorporates seating (take that Philadelphia), as well as lighting and projections by Taylor Levy and Che-Wei Wang. Technically, Acconci’s first foray into architecture was way back in 1971, the year the Bronx Museum opened. Though it’s unlikely anyone remembers Seedbed for its central wooden structure...