Posts tagged with "Biennale":

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Boston’s emerging designers get spotlight in design biennial

Winners of the fifth Design Biennial Boston can be viewed on The Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway Conservancy in Boston. Aimed to celebrate and give exposure to up-and-coming architects and designers from the New England region, the Biennial is on view until October 18th. This year, it consists of four installations which vary in themes, materials and artistic style. In order to bring their ideas to life, Design Biennial Boston has provided each winning team with $10,000 and access to cutting-edge fabrication equipment provided by sponsor Autodesk BUILD Space. The four winning teams, selected among a pool of designers from New England, were called upon to create installations echoing the region’s unique qualities and reflecting on the Greenway’s Playful Perspectives theme. The works by Jennifer Bonner of MALL, Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy of DESIGN EARTH, Daniel Ibañez of Margen-Lab, and Yasmin Vobis and Aaron Forrest of ULTRAMODERNE entertain ideas of rigid to free-flowing forms, local materials, economic trends, and global impacts all representative of the region. Another Axon by Jennifer Bonner of MALL (pictured above) is an installation comprised of a colorful array of twelve minimalist trees. A play on traditional architecture and design rendering, the installation uses common building materials such as vinyl siding, stucco, and artificial turf to challenge perceived building ideas. Primitive by Yasmin Vobis and Aaron Forrest of ULTRAMODERNE is a geometric disposition of lines juxtaposed with rough materials: rugged cedar columns canopied with a thin aluminum shroud. The relationship between the shapes create an experience of existence within an abstracted, delicate grove. Blue Marble Circus by Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy of DESIGN EARTH is a spherical, plastic monument highlighting the correlation between humanity's actions and the degradation of the ecosystem. The installation, as the name suggests, is a deep-blue plastic sphere which through form, color and material refers to the iconic symbol of environmental awareness. Ways of Wood by Daniel Ibañez of MARGEN-LAB is a compilation of logs that serve as public seating. The logs draw a visual connection between different states in timber's industrial process, from raw material to its highly polished state as a designed object. The installation aims to initiate a conversation on North America’s timber extraction industry and serve as a reminder of the often forgotten natural source of timber.
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First-ever Antarctic Biennale takes architecture on a South Pole cruise

These days it seems there are tri- and biennials (or biennales, for all you sophisticates) popping up in cities all over: In addition to the venerable, alternating art and architecture biennials in Venice, in recent years architects and artists have convened in Shenzen and BejingLisbon, Berlin, and Oslo; Chicago and soon, Columbus, Indiana. Now, the enterprising tentacular reach of international artists and designers, aided by global warming, are moving their skip-a-year shows to a new locale—Antarctica. The just-launched Antarctic Biennial, which artist-founder Alexander Ponomarev is calling an "international socio-cultural phenomenon," will take 100 participants by vintage research vessel to the southernmost continent in March 2017 to mull over "shared spaces" like oceans, outer space, and of course, the antarctic. The idea has crossover appeal: In 2014 Ponomarev founded the Venice Architecture Biennale’s first supranational pavilion, featuring 15 architects. The pavilion returned the following year, for art, and again in 2016 for architecture with ANTARCTICA: RE-CYCLICAL, featuring work by Asymptote co-founder Hani Rashid. As announced this month at Art Basel Miami Beach, Berlin-based architect Gustav Duesing and artist Sho Hasegawa won the Biennial's open call and will join other explorers on the expedition next year. Below, the Antarctic Biennial–produced video, complete with foghorns and rapid-fire closed captioning, pretty much says it all: http://www.antarcticbiennale.com/wp/wp-content/themes/antarctic/video/video1.mp4 Learn more about the polar biennale here.
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Inside the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam

The two-story concrete Fenixloods II, a former coffee warehouse for Rotterdam’s port, boasts a sign asking “What’s Next?” at the upper level entrance to announce the 2016 International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam (IABR) that runs April 23 to July 10. Inside, a Tyvek curtain is printed with introductory text and visitors can be immersed in a virtual reality film, an example of new technologies that are creating "mixed"—as opposed to fully virtual—reality (MR). A flat screen projects movies—created by the designers of IABR with Rnul Interactive—that show 10-year-olds who pause in their activities to say, “welcome.” Just a few steps into it, this seems to be a different kind of show. The exhibitions focus on what we can develop in the future: not just the “New Economy” but the “Next Economy,” both in terms of policies that direct design and design that directs policy in urban areas. Featuring a selection of over sixty projects on the themes of the healthy city, inclusive city, productive city, and sustainable city, the exhibition is curated by Maarten Hajer with exhibition design by Michiel van Iersel, the Belgium architecture firm 51N4E, and Dutch graphic designers 75B. It encompasses not only the call for projects (23 selected) but also country-focused guest-curated sections from China and South Africa. Those are joined by an additional group of ateliers from Holland, Belgium, and Albania that produced over the past year design solutions for sustainable and productive cities. Many projects combine DIY tactical urbanism strategies such as the Hackable Cityplot, in which designers and residents are revitalizing a former industrial area in Amsterdam with self-built housing and shared infrastructures. Others focus on issues of local value-added economies in contrast to the extractive and more abusive ones. The opening weekend included lectures and discussions with a welcome from Rotterdam’s Labour Party mayor Ahmed Aboutaleb. He spoke of the need for a “peaceful city” and articulated new ways of community-based planning in Rotterdam where the citizens are making their own neighborhood plan—something not unlike New York’s 197a plans. Curator Hajer animatedly moderated sessions on the productive city with Rotterdam and South African-based teams showing projects such as IShack, which is a solar power-based community electricity system in Stellenbosch Cape Town, and new manufacturing initiatives for Rotterdam The Hague region. The vast exhibition in the 2,600-square-meter-space is designed to mimic the public realm: there are no barriers between sections, enabling open views from one end of the warehouse to the other. This openness is punctuated by plywood constructions forming rooms for talks and hands-on work sessions. Large composite-board tables are the display surfaces for most projects' models and materials. Some tables, such as the one for the Living Necropolis, invite you to lie down to watch a video of the informal houses developed between cemeteries in Manila. Other displays include couches for watching films or settings for interaction. While many projects are regional (due to funding sources and other factors) numerous international projects are displayed. (This includes two from the U.S.) This variety of work demonstrates the potential for essential collaboration among designers, governments, and residents. While the pondering What’s Next? is intriguing, these projects now underway can serve as future models. These range from the mega-scale (regional sustainable energy infrastructures in the Netherlands, ways to house refugees in Europe) to the smallest-scaled item (Parallel Lab's canvas stool that turns into a backpack for use by merchants in the in-between spaces of Hong Kong). Therein lies the value of a show like this: ideas abound, but as a painted wall graphic of William Gibson’s prophesy attests: “The Future is Already Here.”
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34 Nations to submit works for the Inaugural 2016 London Design Biennale

Despite having an established pedigree within the creative world, London has never had its own Biennal(e)—or even Triennale, for that matter. This year however, the city is opening the Inaugural 2016 London Design Biennale, showcasing work from 34 participating countries around the theme of Utopia by Design. Set to be hosted at Somerset House, a former royal palace on the Strand in central London, the Biennale will run from September 7 to 27 this year. On display will be installations curated by leading design institutions from around the world. Participating bodies include USA's Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, DAMnation (Belgium), German Design Council, Moscow Design Museum (Russia), Triennale Design Museum (Italy), India Design Forum, Southern Guild (South Africa), The Japan Foundation, and Victoria and Albert Museum (UK). Other participating nations will be: Albania, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Chile, Croatia, France, Greece, Indonesia, Israel, Korea, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Palestine, Poland, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunisia, and Turkey. Judging the contributions will be an an international advisory committee and jury comprised of established figures within the industry who will "award medals to the Biennale’s most significant national contributions." “We are delighted to announce the first ever London Design Biennale to be held at Somerset House," said Dr. Christopher Turner, Director of the Biennale. "500 years after the publication of Sir Thomas More’s classic, we are inviting countries to interrogate the contentious theme, Utopia by Design. These responses will demonstrate the power design has not only to strike up and inform debate, but also as a catalyst: provoking real change by suggesting inspiring or cautionary futures. Alongside the exhibition there will be an ambitious talks programme bringing together the very best international thinkers, and I hope that the Biennale will become a laboratory of ideas that might, in their way, contribute to making the world a better place.” London Mayor Boris Johnson also added: "Just as the London Olympic and Paralympic Games brought the world together through sport, they also inspired it through design, with Barber and Osgerby’s elegant torches and Heatherwick’s kinetic cauldron – a great unifying convergence of nations in fire and copper. In autumn 2016 the London Design Biennale will attract designers, as well as visitors, from all around the world for a vigorous exchange of ideas and ingenuity—the currency of London’s important and world-leading creative economy.”
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Flux Factory revives a “threat to the motoring public” with the first Fung Wah Biennial

Remember the Fung Wah Bus? Posing an "imminently hazardous and potentially deadly risk for its own drivers, passengers and for the motoring public," the Chinatown bus provided fast, dirt cheap service between New York and Boston before the company shuttered in 2015. Now, thanks to New York–based arts nonprofit Flux Factory, eager riders can re-live the experience: For three Saturdays in March, the arts group is commissioning 24 artists for the first Fung Wah Biennial. The daylong, site-specific exhibitions will take place on trips from New York to Baltimore, Boston, and Philadelphia, three of the most popular Chinatown bus routes. (Although Fung Wah ran buses on one route only, Flux uses "Fung Wah" as metonymy for the network of buses that ferries passengers from Chinatown to Chinatown in the northeastern U.S.) On the ride, artists will share sound installations, video projections, performances, and other pieces that "tease out the nuanced politics of transit." Commissioned pieces explore the loneliness, isolation, and fun of travel; travel and migration; and the history and infrastructure of Chinatown buses. Tickets, priced from $36.87 to $47.12, are a far reach from Fung Wah's $10 fares, but there's art! Most passengers will be ticketed Biennial-goers, although those just trying to get from point A to B are in for a real surprise. The idea for the biennial, curated By Sally Szwed, Matthias Borello, and Will Owen, arose from conversations around the high cost of living and studio space is forcing artists out to other cities; travel for leisure, work, or necessity; and a comment on the network of privately operated, affordable transportation between Chinatowns. Below are participating artists and their designated routes:

BOSTON: Marco Castro, Eric Doeringer, Fan Letters (Alex Nathanson + Dylan Neely), Sunita Prasad, Joshua Caleb Wiebley, Ariel Abrahams + Rony Efrat, Magali Duzant, Keith Hartwig + Daniel Newman, Seth Timothy Larson + Abigail Entsminger, Manuel Molina Martagon, Kristoffer Ørum, Ruth Patir, Pines / Palms (Emily Ensminger + Sophie Trauberman), Jonah Levy, Roopa Vasudevan, Tereza Szwanda

PHILADELPHIA: Michael Barraco, Chloë Bass, Adam Milner, Marjan Verstappen + Jessica Valentin, Meg Wiessner, Joshua Caleb Wiebley, Ariel Abrahams + Rony Efrat, Magali Duzant, Keith Hartwig + Daniel Newman, Seth Timothy Larson + Abigail Entsminger, Manuel Molina Martagon, Kristoffer Ørum Ruth Patir, Pines / Palms (Emily Ensminger + Sophie Trauberman), Jonah Levy, Roopa Vasudevan, Tereza Szwanda

BALTIMORE: Dillon De Give, Ursula Nistrup, Kristoffer Ørum, Ariel Abrahams + Rony Efrat, Fan Letters ( Alex Nathanson + Dylan Neely), Magali Duzant, Keith Hartwig + Daniel Newman, Seth Timothy Larson + Abigail Entsminger, Manuel Molina Martagon, Ruth Patir, Pines / Palms (Emily Ensminger + Sophie Trauberman), Kristoffer Ørum, Jonah Levy, Roopa Vasudevan, Tereza Szwanda

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First Look> Inside the Chicago Architecture Biennial

AN got a firsthand look at some of the projects inside the Chicago Cultural Center, many of which are juxtaposed across media, scale, and intellectual territory. For example, simple wood models from South African studio Noero Architects' 180 Square Meters sat quietly next to a wild set of renderings by François Roche that showed digital narratives of buildings as characters in their surroundings. Nearby, an oddly-detailed full-scale mock-up of a light steel stud-framed room welcomed visitors to go inside. Here are some of our favorites from our first glimpse at the sprawling main exhibition in Chicago: "The End of Sitting" questions why we design so much of our environment for sitting, given recent research showing how unhealthy it is to sit all day. This is the first show by the radical architecture and media collective Environmental Communications. It includes a selection from 200,000 images found in a Venice, California, garage. The Rock Print load-bearing column was built using a robot that placed rocks bound by string into a mold, which was then removed to create this curious structure. Atelier Bow-Wow occupied the courtyard of the Cultural Center, which is an important place, but is often cut-off from the rest of the building. They animated the courtyard by exploring the idea of a prison as a place of potential. Amanda Williams's work on the south side of Chicago includes a set of abandoned houses painted with colors derived from pop culture in the surrounding neighborhoods. It is displayed in a hallway. MOS Architects built a house made of hallways to critique McMansions, which they see as all foyers and hallways. Its disciplinary deadpan was a great juxtaposition next to "Architecture is Everywhere" by Sou Fujimoto Architects, a series of small everyday objects, like staples and binder clips, arranged into architectural models complete with scale figures. Makeshift is an ad-hoc construction that responds to its specific site with an improvised structure for music performance. It is based on the music legacy of Chicago. The Biennial is bustling with people as well, as everyone from Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel to designers from around the world are in attendance. For ongoing Chicago Biennial coverage, check back with AN over the next few days and weeks.
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Iker Gil to curate speculative Chicago projects for city’s inaugural architecture biennial

As the Chicago Architecture Biennial's October opening approaches, its organizers are beginning to release details about its forthcoming exhibitions. The latest hint is an ad for BOLD, a show of “speculative proposals that re-imagine the design potential” of Chicago's waterways, roadways, vacant lots and public space. Subtitled Alternative Scenarios for Chicago, the show will be organized by architect Iker Gil of MAS Studio (Read AN's Q&A with Gil here.) Local graphic designers Plural are also overseeing the event. Per the press release, the following firms will participate in BOLD: CAMESgibson + SOM David Brown with 3D Design StudioCentral Standard Office of DesignAnia JaworskaKrueck+SextonLandon Bone BakerStanley TigermanMargaret McCurry,JGMA, and JAHN David Schalliol Design With Company Hinterlands Michael Pecirno PORT UrbanLab Weathers with AECOM Earlier this month the exhibition organizers announced the winners of its Lakefront Kiosk competition: Rhode Island–based Ultramoderne will build a sleek, low-slung pavilion dubbed Chicago Horizon. Its first show was announced last year: an exhibit of aerial photography by Iwan Baan. The inaugural biennial will host more than 100 architects and artists from more than 30 countries.
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Chicago Architecture Biennial adds 40 firms to inaugural festival’s roster

The Chicago Architecture Biennial released a full list of participating designers today, bringing the total to more than 100 architects and artists from more than 30 countries. Beginning October 3, the inaugural festival of architecture, art, and design is being billed as “the largest international survey of contemporary architecture in North America,” and if all goes well it is expected to become a regular occurrence.

In addition to big-name architects and artists like Bjarke Ingels, Iwan Baan, and Jeanne Gang, the biennial's participants include young, ascending firms from several continents.

Details about the festival, however, have been closely guarded by its organizers and Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who has framed the festival as a continuation of the legacy left by the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. Here's the full list of participants: Al Borde (Quito, Ecuador) all(zone) (Bangkok, Thailand) Andreas Angelidakis (Athens, Greece) Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation (Madrid, Spain; New York, United States) Aranda\Lasch (Tucson and New York, United States) Architecten De Vylder Vinck Taillieu (Gent, Belgium) Assemble (London, United Kingdom) Atelier Bow-Wow (Tokyo, Japan) Iwan Baan (Amsterdam, Netherlands) Baukuh (Milan, Italy) Besler & Sons + ATLV (Los Angeles, United States) Tatiana Bilbao S.C. (Mexico City, Mexico) BIG - Bjarke Ingels Group (Copenhagen, Denmark; New York, United States) Santiago Borja (Mexico City, Mexico) David Brown with 3D Design Studio, Central Standard Office of Design, Ania Jaworska, Krueck+Sexton, Landon Bone Baker, Stanley Tigerman, Margaret McCurry, JGMA, JAHN (Chicago, United States) Carlos Bunga (Barcelona, Spain) Bureau Spectacular (Los Angeles, United States) SOM + CAMESgibson (Chicago, United States) Counterspace (Johannesburg, South Africa) Csutoras & Liando (Jakarta, Indonesia; London, United Kingdom) DAAR (Decolonizing Architecture Art Residency) (Beit Sahour, Palestinian Territories) Design With Company (Chicago, United States) Environmental Communications (Los Angeles, United States); Mark Wasiuta, Marcos Sanchez, Adam Bandler + GSAPP Exhibitions (New York, United States) El Equipo de Mazzanti + Nicolas París (Bogota, Colombia) Assaf Evron (Chicago, United States; Tel Aviv, Israel) Fake Industries Architectural Agonism + University of Technology, Sydney (New York, United States; Sydney, Australia) Fala Atelier (Porto, Portugal) Ramak Fazel (Los Angeles, United States) Frida Escobedo Taller de Arquitectura (Mexico City, Mexico) Didier Faustino (Paris, France) Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zürich (Zürich, Switzerland) + Self Assembly Lab, MIT (Cambridge, United States) Nikolaus Hirsch/Michel Müller (Frankfurt, Germany) with David Adjaye (London, United Kingdom), Markus Binder (Stuttgart, Germany), Bollinger + Grohmann Ingenieure (Frankfurt, Germany), Aroon Puritat & Chayanon Hansapinyo & Sumeth Klahan (Chiang Mai, Thailand), Tobias Rehberger (Frankfurt, Germany),Tomás Saraceno (Berlin, Germany), Superflex (Copenhagen, Denmark) Hinterlands Urbanism and Landscape (Chicago, United States) Moon Hoon (Seoul, Korea) Independent Architecture (Denver, United States)+ Paul Preissner Architects(Chicago, United States) John Ronan Architects (Chicago, United States) Johnston Marklee (Los Angeles, United States) junya.ishigami+associates (Tokyo, Japan) Barbara Kasten (Chicago, United States) Kéré Architecture (Berlin, Germany) Kuehn Malvezzi (Berlin, Germany)+ Armin Linke (Milan, Italy; Berlin, Germany) +Marko Lulić (Vienna, Austria) Anne Lacaton & Jean-Philippe Vassal + Frédéric Druot (Paris, France) Yasmeen Lari + Heritage Foundation Pakistan (Karachi, Pakistan) Lateral Office (Toronto, Canada) LCLA Office (Cambridge, United States; Medellín, Colombia) LIST (Paris, France) MAIO (Barcelona, Spain) Makeka Design Lab (Cape Town, South Africa) Mass Studies (Seoul, Korea) MOS Architects (New York, United States) New-Territories / M4 (Paris, France; Bangkok, Thailand) NLÉ (Lagos, Nigeria; Amsterdam, Netherlands) Noero Architects (Cape Town, South Africa) Norman Kelley (Chicago and New York, United States) OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen (Brussels, Belgium) + Bas Princen(Rotterdam, Netherlands) onishimaki + hyakudayuki architects (Tokyo, Japan) OPEN Architecture (Beijing, China) + Spirit of Space (Chicago, United States) otherothers (Sydney, Australia) P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S (Los Angeles, United States) Michael Pecirno (London, United Kingdom) Pedro&Juana (Mexico City, Mexico) Pezo von Ellrichshausen (Concepción, Chile) PIOVENEFABI (Milan, Italy) Plan:b Arquitectos (Medellín, Colombia) Point Supreme (Athens, Greece) PORT Urbanism (Chicago, United States) PRODUCTORA (Mexico City, Mexico) RAAAF [Rietveld Architecture-Art-Affordances] (Amsterdam, Netherlands) Pedro Reyes (Mexico City, Mexico) Bryony Roberts (Los Angeles, United States) + South Shore Drill Team (Chicago, United States) RUA Arquitetos (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) Rural Urban Framework (Hong Kong) Tomás Saraceno (Berlin, Germany) David Schalliol (Chicago, United States) selgascano + helloeverything (Madrid, Spain) Deane Simpson (Copenhagen, Denmark) Sio2arch (Chicago, United States; Barcelona, Spain) Smout Allen (London, United Kingdom) + Geoff Manaugh (New York, United States) SO-IL (New York, United States) Sou Fujimoto Architects (Tokyo, Japan) Stefano Boeri Architetti (Milan, Italy) Studio Albori (Milan, Italy) Studio [D] Tale (Harare, Zimbabwe; Cape Town, South Africa; London, United Kingdom) Studio Gang (Chicago, United States) TOMA (Santiago, Chile) UrbanLab (Chicago, United States) URBZ (Mumbai, India) Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam) WAI Architecture Think Tank (Beijing, China) WEATHERS with AECOM (Chicago, United States) Amanda Williams (Chicago, United States) Wolff Architects (Cape Town, South Africa) WORKac + Ant Farm (New York, United States) Liam Young (London, United Kingdom)
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An expanse of sustainable timber just clinched the Chicago Architecture Biennial’s Lakefront Kiosk Competition

Officials with the Chicago Architecture Biennial today announced the winners of the Lakefront Kiosk Competition, choosing a team whose stated goal was “to build the largest flat wood roof possible.” Dubbed Chicago Horizon, the design is by Rhode Island–based Ultramoderne, a collaboration between architects Yasmin Vobis and Aaron Forrest and structural engineer Brett Schneider. Their pavilion uses cross-laminated timber, a new lumber product that some structural engineers call carbon-negative for its ability to displace virgin steel and concrete while sequester the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide during its growth. Ultramoderne's long, flat roof “aims to provide an excess of public space for the Architecture Biennial and Chicago beach-goers,” according to the project description. Their design rose above 420 other entries from designers in more than 40 countries, and will receive a $10,000 honorarium, as well as a $75,000 production budget to realize the kiosk. BP is providing those funds as part of a $2.5 million grant to the inaugural biennial. Three teams—Lekker Architects, Tru Architekten, and Kelley, Palider, Paros—were finalists for the top honor. Fala Atelier, Kollectiv Atelier, and Guillame Mazars all received an honorable mention. The Biennial has posted a selection of submissions to the Lakefront Kiosk Competition on its Pinterest page.

After the biennial, Chicago Horizon "will find a permanent home in Spring 2016, operating as a food and beverage vendor, as well as a new public space along the lakefront.

During the Biennial three other kiosks will be installed along the lakefront. Details on those are due to be announced next week, but here are the preliminary project descriptions:
The Cent Pavilion, designed by Pezo von Ellrichshausen in collaboration with the Illinois Institute of Technology, is a forty-foot tower meant to convey silent and convoluted simplicity. Rock, the kiosk designed by Kunlé Adeyemi in collaboration with the School of the Art Institute of Chicago is a pop-up pavilion a public sculpture composed from the raw and historic limestone blocks that once protected the city’s shoreline. Summer Vault, designed by Paul Andersen of Independent Architecture and Paul Preissner of Paul Preissner Architects, in collaboration with the University of Illinois, Chicago, is a lakefront kiosk that consists of basic geometric shapes combined to create a freestanding hangout within the park.
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Here are the 60 designers exhibiting at the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial

More than 60 design firms across four continents will contribute to a new festival of design that aims to become the largest international survey of contemporary architecture in North America, co-artistic directors Joseph Grima and Sarah Herda announced Tuesday. The Chicago Architecture Biennial kicks off October 3 and lasts through the year, comprising one-time events and ongoing exhibitions across the city. The festival will be based at the Chicago Cultural Center, but activities will extend to sites including Millennium Park, Michigan Avenue's City Gallery, 72 East Randolph Street, and the Theaster Gates–rehabbed Stony Island Arts Bank. Chicago officials announced the biennial in June. Until now details were scant on the festival, which takes after the Venice biennale. Questions remain, however, on the content of the participating designers' expected contributions, and on the city's ability to fund what has been advertised as a major tourist draw with global cultural significance. Oil giant BP agreed to donate $2.5 million for the inaugural show—a contribution that was reportedly solicited personally by Mayor Rahm Emanuel. And Tuesday Biennial organizers announced a $1 million gift from SC Johnson. But the city’s still looking to raise at least half a million dollars more. “The Biennial team affirms with confidence that the fundraising goal will be met,” said a spokeswoman. The Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE) and the Graham Foundation will present the show, with programming in partnership with the American Institute of Architects and the Chicago Architecture Foundation. Iwan Baan will exhibit a photo series about Chicago, the organizers announced in November, and the show will pay homage to Chicago architect Stanley Tigerman, who in 1977 helped mount a seminal conference that gave today's biennial its name: The State of the Art of Architecture. Here's the full list of participating firms, as of April 14: Al Borde (Quito, Ecuador) allzone / Rachaporn Choochuey (Bangok, Thailand) Andreas Angelidakis (Athens, Greece) Andrés Jaque / Office for Political Innovation (Madrid, Spain; New York, USA) Aranda\Lasch (Tuscon, USA; New York, USA) Assemble (London, UK) Atelier Bow-Wow (Tokyo, Japan) Iwan Baan (Amsterdam, Netherlands) Erin Besler / Besler & Sons (Los Angeles, USA) Tatiana Bilbao S.C. (Mexico City, Mexico) Bjarke Ingels Group / BIG (Copenhagen, Denmark) Santiago Borja (Mexico City, Mexico) Carlos Bunga (Barcelona, Spain) Bureau Spectacular / Jimenez Lai (Los Angeles, USA) Csutoras & Liando (Jakarta, Indonesia; London, UK) Design With Company (Chicago, USA) El Equipo de Mazzanti / Giancarlo Mazzanti (Bogota, Colombia) Frida Escobedo (Mexico City, Mexico) Didier Faustino (Paris, France) Moon Hoon (Seoul, Korea) Indie Architecture + Paul Preissner Architects (Denver/Chicago, USA) John Ronan Architects (Chicago, USA) Johnston Marklee (Los Angeles, USA) junya.ishigami+associates (Tokyo, Japan) Kéré Architecture / Francis Kéré (Gando, Burkina Faso; Berlin, Germany) Kuehn Malvezzi (Berlin, Germany) Anne Lacaton & Jean-Philippe Vassal and Frederic Druot (Paris, France) Yasmeen Lari / Heritage Foundation Pakistan (Lahore, Pakistan) Lateral Office (Toronto, Canada) LIST / Ido Avissar (Paris, France) MAIO (Barcelona, Spain) Marshall Brown Projects (Chicago, USA) Mass Studies / Minsuk Cho (Seoul, Korea) MOS / Michael Meredith and Hilary Sample (New York, USA) New-Territories / Francois Roche & Camille Lacadee (Paris, France/Bangkok, Thailand) NLÉ / Kunlé Adeyemi (Lagos, Nigeria; Rotterdam, Netherlands) Norman Kelley (Chicago, USA) OFFICE / Kersten Geers David Van Severen (Brussels, Belgium) Onishimaki + Hyakuda Architects (Tokyo, Japan) OPEN Architecture/ Li Hu & Huang Wenjing (Beijing, China) Lluís Ortega / Sio2arch (Chicago, USA; Barcelona, Spain) otherothers / David Neustein & Grace Mortlock (Sydney, Australia) Pedro&Juana (Mexico City, Mexico) Pezo von Ellrichshaussen (Concepcion, Chile) Plan:b Arquitectos / Felipe Mesa & Federico Mesa (Medellin, Colombia) PORT (Chicago, USA) Productora (Mexico City, Mexico) RAAAF [Rietveld Architecture-Art-Affordances] (Amsterdam, Netherlands) Bryony Roberts (Los Angeles, USA; Oslo, Norway) RUA Arquitetos (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) Rural Urban Framework (Hong Kong) SO-IL (New York, USA) Sou Fujimoto Architects (Tokyo, Japan) studio Albori (Milan, Italy) Studio [D]Tale (Harare, Zimbabwe; Capetown, South Africa; London, UK) Studio Gang / Jeanne Gang (Chicago, USA) TOMA (Santiago, Chile) UrbanLab / Sarah Dunn and Martin Felson (Chicago, USA) VTN / Vo Trong Nghia Architects (Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam) WAI Architecture Think Tank (Beijing, China) Weathers / Sean Lally (Chicago, USA) Amanda Williams (Chicago, USA) WORKac+ Ant Farm / Amale Andraos & Dan Wood, Chip Lord & Curtis Schreier (New York, USA) A full list of the festival's sponsors and partners is available on chicagoarchitecturebiennial.org.
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Chicago announces inaugural architecture biennial to begin in 2015

Chicago, in a bid to boost its tourism industry and cultural cachet,  will host an international design exhibition next year modeled after the Venice Biennale, which every two years draws contributions from architects and artists from around the world. Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced the Chicago Architecture Biennial Tuesday. Speaking to the Chicago Tribune’s Blair Kamin, Emanuel said he hopes to use the city’s reputation as a hub for modern architecture to encourage economic development:
"Obviously there's an economic benefit in tourism and travel. Chicago will continue to be seen worldwide as an epicenter of modern architecture… The real question is: Why wasn't Chicago doing this before?"
The Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events (DCASE) and the Graham Foundation will present the show, which will be based in the Chicago Cultural Center. The Chicago Architecture Foundation, whose annual Open House Chicago will coincide with the start of the initial biennial, will help coordinate the first exhibition, which is planned for October 1, 2015 through January 3, 2016. Oil company BP donated $2.5 million for the first show. Kamin reported that Emanuel personally solicited BP’s grant funding, and that the city’s still looking to raise $1.5 million more. While the Chicago event makes no secret of taking after its prestigious namesake in Venice, there will be several differences from that event, which reportedly drew more than 175,000 visitors in 2012. Admission to Chicago’s event will be free, and the show will not have national pavilions. It will have a theme, which has yet to be determined, and will seek to compete in an increasingly crowded field of international design exhibitions. Venice has mounted its exhibition 14 times in 34 years, deviating occasionally from its biennial schedule. If Chicago’s initial event is deemed a success, officials say they’ll duplicate it every two years. Joseph Grima, who co-curated the Istanbul biennial in 2012, and Graham Foundation Director Sarah Herda will co-direct the inaugural Chicago event. Another Chicago-based design curator, Zöe Ryan of the Art Institute of Chicago, is coordinating Istanbul’s next biennial, which will run concurrently with Chicago’s.
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Chicago’s School of the Art Institute taps Jonathan Solomon as head of architecture

Chicago’s top art school announced big changes in its design department this morning. The School of the Art Institute of Chicago Thursday announced their selection of Jonathan Solomon as the new Director of the Department of Architecture, Interior Architecture, and Designed Objects (AIADO). Solomon, who comes from his position as associate professor and associate dean at the School of Architecture at Syracuse University, assumes the job officially on August 1. In 2010 Solomon, who holds a Bachelor of Arts in Urban Studies from Columbia University and a Master of Architecture and Certificate in Media and Modernity from Princeton University, helped curate Workshopping: An American Model of Architectural Practice at the Venice Architecture Biennial. He is the co-founder of 306090, a nonprofit arts stewardship organization. He previously taught design at the City College of New York, the University at Buffalo, and the University of Hong Kong, where he led the Department of Architecture as Acting Head from 2009 to 2012. He is a licensed architect in the State of Illinois. Solomon recently spoke on a Chicago Architecture Foundation panel discussing Chicago Tribune architecture critic Blair Kamin’s series on Chicago designers in China. He is related to Lou Solomon, who helped found Chicago design firm Solomon Cordwell Buenz (SCB).