Posts tagged with "Year in Review 2016":

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The good, the bad, and the ugly: AN’s best preservation stories

In the trenches, preservation can feel cyclical—historic buildings are defended and saved, others destroyed, and public appreciation grows for once-loathed styles (looking at you, brutalism). This year's brilliant adaptive reuse projects are worthy of their own list, but we chose to highlight the epic sagas—new landmarks, victories against out-of-scale development, priceless buildings pulverized, and the controversies and cliffhangers that will shape preservation debates through next year and beyond. (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) Marcel Breuer takes the East Coast by storm Brutalism has a healthy second life online, but in real life concrete buildings often seem a hair away from the wrecking ball. This year, though, fate was pretty kind to one of the masters of the genre. Although Marcel Breuer has been dead for more than three decades, the opening of the Met Breuer, and two other controversies surrounding his buildings, spurred a revival of interest in his imposing yet playful work. In Reston, Virginia, a Breuer building was threatened with demolition, then saved, then demolished—a heartbreaking tale. Further south, an Atlanta library designed by the architect was saved after a public outcry. While the Reston building is gone for good, see what Graves, Koolhaas, and Piano would've done to the former Whitney—it is possible to adapt brutalist buildings without compromising their essential character. Miami Marine The City of Miami declared in November it will borrow up to $45 million to preserve this stadium, an open-air venue for boat races on Biscayne Bay designed by architect Hilario Candela and completed in 1963. The cantilevered concrete structure was severely damaged by Hurricane Andrew in 1992 and left to decay. Restoration of the original structure, as well as the construction of a new 35,000-square-foot maritime center adjacent to the stadium, will begin when funding is secured. Lautner’s Sheats Goldstein Residence has been gifted to LACMA James Goldstein has donated his landmark house, located on Angelo View Drive, Los Angeles, and designed by prolific West Coast architect John Lautner to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). In addition, the dwelling'ss contents and surrounding estate have also been included in the donation. Johnson Fain takes on Philip Johnson’s Crystal Cathedral Johnson Fain is renovating Philip Johnson and John Burgee’s iconic Crystal Cathedral in Anaheim, California. Work on the building, which was completed in 1980 as part of a larger religious campus that contains notable structures by Richard Meier and Partners as well as Richard Neutra, began this year. Preservation across five boroughs While new city laws will make the preservation of controversial or hard-to-love buildings that much harder, this year the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) cleared its roster of almost 100 items that have been on its calendar for years, sometimes decades. As a result, the city has 27 new landmarks—including the Pepsi-Cola sign—to love. Modern architecture hearts were broken, though, when the LPC declined to landmark Alvar Aalto's conference rooms and lecture hall at 809 UN Plaza. Through rezoning, the city is trying to spur the development of more Class A office space in Midtown East, a push that encourages taller buildings but threatens many older ones. In that neighborhood, the commission decided that the Pershing Square Building and the Graybar Building, as well as the Shelton Hotel Building, the Yale Club of New York City, and seven smaller structures, all between East 39th to East 57th streets, from Fifth to Second avenues, were worthy of landmark status. Doing the Wright Thing This year the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation revealed its master plan to preserve Taliesin West, the architect's home and school in the Arizona desert. Harboe Architects drafted the 740-page plan, which outlines preservation strategies for a structure that Wright and his disciples modified many times over the years. The plan presents an approach to conserving deteriorating materials, preserving existing spaces, restoring viewscapes lost to new additions and landscaping, and supporting Taliesin West as a tourist site, education center, and foundation headquarters. The Ambassador Grill and Lounge After a huge push from preservation advocacy groups HDC, docomomo, and fans of postmodern architecture, the LPC is considering Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo Associate's glittery—but threatened—UN Hotel lobby and Ambassador Grill & Lounge for landmark status. At a November hearing, local luminaries like Robert A.M. Stern, Belmont Freeman, and Alexandra Lange, as well as a bi-coastal docomomo contingent spoke in favor of landmarking. The item would be the first postmodern interior to be designated a New York City landmark, and the “youngest” after Roche and Dinkeloo’s Ford Foundation (1963-68) which has interior and exterior landmark status. Meanwhile, the Waldorf-Astoria's mega-glamorous art deco interiors are one step closer to landmark protection. The McKeldin Fountain is no more In Baltimore, contractors have begun demolishing a symbol of the city’s renaissance and the mayor who sparked it, the McKeldin Fountain at Pratt and Light streets. The Downtown Partnership of Baltimore has led the effort to tear down the fountain, named after former Mayor Theodore McKeldin, and replace it with a landscaped plaza that members argue would be a more welcoming gateway to the city. The fountain and adjacent plaza were designed by Philadelphia architect Thomas Todd, a founding partner of WRT, as part of the redevelopment of the Inner Harbor renewal area in the early 1980s. An example of Brutalist architecture made with a series of concrete prisms and walkways, the fountain is owned by the city and listed in the city’s official inventory of public art. It is dedicated to the former mayor who first proposed in 1963 the idea of rejuvenating Baltimore’s Inner Harbor waterfront. Time is running out for the modernist legacy of William Pereira Pereira is most famous for his iconic 1972 Transamerica Building, an 853-foot tall square-based pyramid tower in downtown San Francisco, and for the Googie-styled Theme Building at Los Angeles International Airport, a flying saucer-shaped observation floor supported by four-footed, sinuous frame. These projects are among Pereira’s diverse commissions that number more than 400 and include the masterplans for the Orange County suburb of Irvine, and the University of California at Irvine (UCI) campus. The city of Irvine’s urban plan landed the architect on the cover of Time magazine where Pereira was depicted in front of the suburb’s plan.
Those aspects of his legacy are more or less doing fine—there are serious and ongoing questions about incongruous changes being made to both the Irvine master plan and to the UCI campus —but several of Pereira’s other Los Angeles works are currently more deeply imperiled.
The challenge of preserving architectural heritage in Philadelphia This year Philadelphia—home of the Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, and Rittenhouse Square—can boast of another historic attribute: It is the first and only city in the United States to be named a World Heritage City, one of 266 around the globe.

Despite its recent designation, Philadelphia has had a decidedly uneven record and reputation for historic preservation. Architects who come to the AIA convention will find Center City relatively intact. But other areas of the city are losing historically and architecturally significant buildings at a steady rate, largely due to development pressures and lack of landmark protection.

Saving the Columbus Occupational Health Association Columbus, Indiana is a small Midwestern city filled with buildings designed by a who’s who of American architecture including Eliel Saarinen, Eero Saarinen, I.M. Pei, Kevin Roche, Richard Meier, Harry Weese, César Pelli, Gunnar Birkerts, Robert Venturi, Robert Stern, and many others. Now, its 1973 health center, designed by Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates, (HHPA) is for sale. Despite its wealth of modern architecture and a forthcoming biennale, the town has no formal preservation laws, so a sale could mean the destruction or thoughtless modification of this important building. Yale's Beinecke Library is now open The Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library reopened its iconic building in September following a 16-month renovation led by Hammond Beeby Rupert Ainge Architects with Newman Architects of New Haven. Completed in 1963, Beinecke is considered Gordon Bunshaft’s masterpiece. One of the largest libraries in the world dedicated to rare books, its exterior grid of granite and Vermont marble panels are one of the most recognizable designs of that era and remains both inspiring and inimitable. The renovations restored the architectural landmark to its illuminated glory by refurbishing the six-story glass stack tower, preserving the sculpture garden by Isamu Noguchi, upgrading the library’s climate-control system, and expanding classroom space. Developer wants to put glass cubes on landmarked SOM plaza Fosun International, the Shanghai-based owner of Manhattan’s 28 Liberty Street (formerly One Chase Manhattan Plaza), has commissioned SOM to revamp their own classic International Style building and 2.5-acre plaza design. Among its planned changes to the site, Fosun received LPC approval to build three glass pavilions on the plaza that will serve as entrances to below-ground retail. To do this, Fosun needs to make changes to the site's deed, a move that many preservationists say will disrupt the integrity of Gordon Bunshaft's original vision. Both the International Style building and plaza were designated a New York City landmark in 2009. SOM is updating the tower’s office space and plaza and reintroducing original details lost in prior renovations while transforming approximately 290,000 square feet (four floors) of basement space into retail. (AN first covered the design proposal, and ensuing controversy, in July.) With new rules regarding deed changes now in effect, it remains to be seen how—or if—these glass pavilions will be built. Stop the Pop "After the rollout of #StopThePop campaign last June, what actually popped to the surface was less a discussion about preserving architectural landmarks, and more a social media–facilitated debate regarding what constitutes good taste."
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Who we lost in 2016

A list no one likes read, but here's a collection of notable figures who we lost from the design world this year. (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) Zaha Hadid The tragic passing of Iraqi-British architect Zaha Hadid sent shockwaves through the architectural community and beyond. The Architect's Newspaper (AN) helped break the news of her death and shortly followed-up with an obituary and tribute from architect Sir Peter Cook. Renato Bialetti The creator of one of the most ubiquitous Italian industrial designs of the 20th century, Renato Bialetti was fittingly interred in one of his designs—the octagonal Moka coffee maker. Peter Corrigan Australian architect Dr. Peter Corrigan, AM, the dean of a vigorous and difficult brand of Australian architecture passed away on December 1, 2016. Corrigan leaves behind a grand legacy: of many buildings and countless awards received; of numerous protégés and perhaps some enemies; of wild ideas shared selflessly with many students in Melbourne and elsewhere; of an architectural voice in the wilderness built of dreams and hopes set against the small-mindedness of the local political leadership and the usual numbing logics of the construction market. Bing Thom Hong Kong-born Canadian architect Bing Thom won the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Gold Medal in 2016, the same year as his passing. He was described as "full of passion, thoughtfulness, intelligence, generosity of spirit, and belief in the power of architecture to transform." Claude Parent "Master of the oblique," French architect Claude Parent died on February 27, a day after his 93rd birthday. He was one of the most influential modernist architects to come out of France and founder of the oblique function. His style is widely acknowledged for paving the way for architects such as Daniel Libeskind, Frank Gehry, and the late Zaha Hadid. Thomas S. Marvel Thomas S. Marvel, FAIA, was born in Newburgh, New York, on March 15, 1935 and passed away on November 3, 2015 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. He designed numerous residences, including a very innovative house for his own family in a dense urban neighborhood that was published in Phaidon’s edition of 20th-Century World Architecture. Jack Masey Born in Brooklyn in 1924, Jack Masey worked out of Manhattan for most of his life. A trained architect who also studied graphic design at Yale, Masey worked with R. Buckminster Fuller and Charles and Ray Eames at numerous exhibitions where he incorporated art by the likes of Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. Ali Tayar Ali Tayar is remembered for his love of modern design which he applied to a range of projects including everything from furniture to hardware to restaurants Pop Burger and Pizza Bar in New York City. He grew up in Istanbul and studied architecture at the University of Stuttgart and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Later, Tayar founded the Parallel Design Partnership in 1993. Vladimir Kagan Born August 29, 1927 in Worms, Germany, Vladimir Kagan fled Nazi Germany to France and then settled in New York. While he studied architecture at Columbia University, he never graduated and instead worked with his father at a cabinetry shop before selling his own furniture. Kagan and his furniture flourished; he sold works to films stars such as Marilyn Monroe and Gary Cooper. At the age of 88, he passed away on April 7, 2016, in Palm Beach, Florida Diana Balmori Born in 1932, landscape architect Diana Balmori was a leader in the landscape profession, particularly of designing spaces that interface with architecture. Balmori’s firm Balmori Associates is headquartered in New York but she worked in countries all over the globe, such as with her New Government City in South Korea—a zero waste community designed in 2014.
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2016 was god-awful, but are here are 13 feel-good stories to ring in the new year

If we're being honest, the last few weeks of 2016 were a bit horrible (particularly on the election front) but the entire year wasn't all bad! As we head into its final days, here are our favorite feel-good stories to put that warm and fuzzy feeling back in your heart. (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) Peter Zellner launches Free School of Architecture Architect Peter Zellner's new project, the Free School of Architecture (FSA), will launch next summer as a “tuition and salary free” school seeking to “explore the edges of architectural education.” Read AN's exclusive Q+A with Zellner here. L.A.’s expanding transit is challenging the city’s auto-urbanism In the four years since the first spur of the Expo opened, developers have begun to wake to the untapped market for transit-oriented development along the corridor, signaling a shift not only in the ways in which Angelenos get to and from work, but where and how they live their lives beyond business hours. Now that the line has been completed, development along the western length of the corridor has sped up. #SWA: Scalies with Attitude A new website that allows users to download scale figures for architectural renderings, but these aren't your average figures—all races, ages, and body types are represented. Shout out to Just Nøt The Same for making representation in architecture matter. Passive-Aggressive design: When sustainability shapes architecture Today, architects are more concerned with sustainability than ever, and new takes on old passive techniques are not only responsible, but can produce architecture that expresses sustainable features through formal exuberance. We call it “passive-aggressive.” Chicago's South Side gets a boost Artist Theaster Gates is getting $10.25 million to grow a network of art institutions. Youth on the South Side will benefit from a coordinated effort between four major donors, as well as a few private philanthropists. Ori The modular robotic home furniture from MIT's Media Lab will help you get the most of your shoebox apartment. Check out the video, above. Revisionary Ethics buildingcommunityWORKSHOP seeks to improve the livability and viability of communities through thoughtful design. Here's how. This water is so wet When downtown Lexington, Kentucky held a competition to revitalize and re-pedestrianize its concrete, car-driven downtown, New York–based SCAPE Landscape Architecture chose to reveal and celebrate its geology. Social Impact Design: The don’t be a Dick edition For some, it’s a motto to live by. One New York City–based nonprofit would like architects to design by it, too. New York City bike lane art scores high points with videogame references The New York City Department of Transportation’s (DOT) Art Program partnered this spring with nonprofit New York Cares to paint two bike lane barriers in styles that will appeal to true 90s kids.
Doing it Right: Ricardo Bofill’s Postmodern La Muralla Roja stars as backdrop for Martin Solveig music video Martin Solveig is often partial to pomo imagery in his music videos. For the French artist’s latest hit Do It Right (featuring Tkay Maidza), the accompanying music video is set at the La Muralla Roja (The Red Wall) in Alicante, southeast Spain. Designed by Catalan postmodernist Ricardo Bofill, the 1973 building made arguably as big of a splash in the industry as Solveig does in his music video.
  JGMA wins Chicago Neighborhood Development Award, immediately donates prize money As part of the 22nd annual Chicago Neighborhood Development Awards (CNDA), Chicago-based JGMA’s El Centro were awarded Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Awards for Excellence in Community Design. During moving his acceptance speech, JGMA lead Juan Moreno brought the 1500-person crowd to its feet, and many to tears, as he explained his plan for the award money. 
LEGO brutalist buildings (of course) Berlin-based LEGO enthusiast Arndt Schlaudraff is using plastic—not concrete—blocks to recreate miniature works of brutalist architecture. Using only white bricks and aided by their orthogonal nature, Schlaudraff is able to perfect the clean finishes, crisp lines, and massing often found in Brutalist architecture.
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The top buildings to open this year

Here we take a look back at what—we think—were there most important buildings to open in 2016. From Mexico to Los Angeles to New York, find the this year's best builds below. (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) World Trade Center Transport Hub (The Oculus) Santiago Calatrava New York, New York On March 3, Santiago Calatrava’s World Trade Center Transit Hub opened with much anticipation and mixed reviews. AN reached out to New York’s architects, designers, and engineers to hear their thoughts on the structure. Spring Street Salt Shed WXY and Dattner Architects New York, New York Resembling exactly what it holds—a grain of salt (the building will store 5,000 tons of the stuff)—the Salt Shed climbs to 70 feet along the Hudson River where Canal Street and West Street align. The Met Breuer (restoration) Beyer Blinder Belle New York, New York The Marcel Breuer-designed building was restored and updated by an in-house design team and New York-based Beyer Blinder Belle. The Architect's Newspaper's senior editor conducted a Q&A with Jorge Otero-Pailos, Associate Professor and incoming director of the Historic Preservation program at Columbia University GSAPP to discuss the building's new look. Speed Art Museum wHY and KNBA Louisville, Kentucky After over four years of construction, Kentucky’s oldest and largest art museum reopened. Louisville’s Speed Art Museum is now nearly twice its former size. This year, the North Pavilion was completed as was the remodeling of the interior of its 1927 neoclassical building. Via 57 West Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) New York, New York BIG's first completed building in the U.S. (I know, hard to believe right?) points in the same direction as the Danish architect's seemingly inevitable trajectory: Up. Tenants began moving into the building this past March; units range from studios to four bedrooms. Bounded by 12th Avenue, West 57th Street, and West 58th Street, the development features a new pedestrian passageway that runs from north to south on the building’s eastern border. Vagelos Education Center Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Gensler New York, New York The Vagelos Education Center is filled with high-tech classrooms and facilities meant to keep Columbia University’s medical students at their field’s cutting edge. The 100,000-square-foot, 14-story tower—the tallest realized by DS+R—is one of the rare medical school facilities designed as an integral vertical structure. OE House Fake Industries Architectural Agonism and Aixopluc Alforja, Spain For this two-level dwelling in northeast Spain, located just below Barcelona, the clients wanted to be able to completely close off one “house” and then move to the other “house,” depending on the season and their current needs. National Museum of African American History and Culture Adjaye Associates, Freelon Group, Davis Brody Bond, and SmithGroupJJR Washington, D.C. Filling the last prominent spot on the National Mall—just east of the Washington Monument—the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) has proven itself a striking addition to the tapestry of monumental architecture at the heart of the nation’s capital. 3,600 bronze-painted aluminum panels clad the museum’s three-tiered structure for what is now a must-see in the city. Navy Pier James Corner Field Operations Chicago, Illinois Often cited as the most popular tourist destination in Chicago, Navy Pier celebrated its 100th anniversary this year with the completion of Phase 1 of its redevelopment. The 3,300-foot-long pier is one of the largest of its kind in the world. Torre Reforma L. Benjamin Romano Arquitectos and Arup Mexico City, Mexico New building codes were implemented after the 1985 earthquake that devastated Mexico City and now Mexican architecture practice L. Benjamin Romano Arquitectos (LBRA), working alongside working alongside engineering firm Arup’s New York office, has produced an earthquake-resistant skyscraper designed to last 2,500 years. John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art Machado Silvetti Sarasota, FL The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, part of a historic 66-acre estate in Sarasota, Florida has received a striking new pavilion designed by Machado Silvetti to house new gallery and multi-purpose lecture space. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) Snøhetta San Francisco, California This 10-story, 235,000-square-foot expansion by Norwegian firm Snohetta is set back from the original SFMOMA Mario Botta-designed structure, adding a funny hat to an already funnily hatted building. The museum opened on May 14 to much aplomb. Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art SO-IL and Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Davis, California The Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Arts opened in Davis, California on November 13. Its iconic roof structure “channels the intense light of the region into constantly changing shadows and silhouettes that animate one of the museum’s primary gathering spaces, the entrance plaza.” University of Iowa Visual Arts Building Steven Holl Architects Iowa City, Iowa The new Visual Arts Building for the University of Iowa’s School of Art and Art History, which replaced a 1936 building that was heavily damaged by a flood, provides 126,000 square feet of loft-like studio space for all visual arts disciplines by utilizing both traditional techniques and advanced technologies. Jerome L. Greene Science Center of Columbia University Renzo Piano Building Workshop New York, New York Described by Piano as a "factory, exploring the secret of the mind, the brain, and behavior," the science center officially opens in January 2017 but was completed in October this year. Rising to nine stories, the 450,000-square-foot building will be home to Columbia’s Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute. Approximately 900 scientists will occupy the facility making use of the flexible teaching facilities available.
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OUTRAGE: The best controversies of 2016

As 2016 fades away, we are looking back at some of the best controversies and tricky issues of the year. Here are our most memorable, most outrageous topics of the year. We love it when our readers respond and add to the conversation! (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) Donald Trump, Robert Ivy, and the AIA When Trump was elected, AIA executive vice president and chief executive officer Robert Ivy responded with a statement of collaboration on behalf of the AIA and its 89,000 members. Architects were not happy about that, and we tracked the outcry. One Maryland architect even resigned over the letter. Ivy apologized, but the dissent continued. Another resignation and another apology later, the end result was a great discussion about what architects can do and what the profession stands for, both as a building trade and a community. Flying pigs at Trump Tower The Trump controversy machine keeps rolling, as one architect proposed an installation to help the city of Chicago cope with the Donald. White Dove or White Elephant? We asked a group of architects and critics what they thought of the new WTC Oculus. MoMA to close galleries dedicated to architecture and design When we caught wind of the plan for MoMA to get rid of the architecture and design galleries in favor of a more cross-disciplinary curatorial agenda, the public was outraged.   Designing the Border Wall? When an internet controversy erupted around the "Building the Border Wall?" competition, Ronald Rael responded with a short history of the complex situation at the U.S. border, and the challenges architects face. The U.S. Pavilion at the Venice Biennale Before the designs were even revealed for the pavilion's proposals, the activist group Detroit Resists was already speaking out against the "Architectural Imagination" and its awkward social position. When AN Editor-in-Chief William Menking saw the pavilion in person, he, too, had questions about its feasibility and its public posture. The curators fired back, and then Detroit Resists spoke up again. Patrik Schumacher in general Schumacher is always good for a controversy. When he was not calling for the Venice Biennale to be shut down, he was calling for a complete privatization of the world, more or less. Zaha Hadid Architects did not like these statements, and released a letter of their own, denouncing the remarks. Similarly, a group of protesters set up outside of the office to speak out against Schumacher. How real estate speculation, ugly architecture, and gentrification shape Austin’s urbanity Austin critic Jack Murphy looks at how the housing market in Austin has taken a turn for the worse architecturally. Renzo Piano’s Whitney is an architectural “tourist trap” Senior Editor Matt Shaw doesn't like the Whitney, and some people agree while others disagree. Education today Los Angeles architect Peter Zellner wrote an op-ed about a more open education system, which Sci-Arc professor Todd Gannon, cultural studies coordinator at SCI-Arc, responded to these criticisms. Zellner then started a school called the Free School of Architecture. Climate change displacement is the new gentrification Stephen Zacks looks at the consequences of sea-level rise on vulnerable communities. Lucas Museum After lawsuits and mudslinging, Chicago looses the Lucas Museum of Narrative Arts Tensions ran high over the MAD Architects-designed Lucas Museum of Contemporary Arts. The city of Chicago battled a local open-space advocates only to have the plans for the museum move back to California.
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Goodbye New York: AN picks the best projects outside the Big Three

The Architect's Newspaper (AN) has editors in New York, Chicago, and L.A., but we're not city snobs. With a network of regional writers from Baltimore to Dallas, Seattle to Phoenix, our mission is to cover projects everywhere in North America—and in 2016, we printed far-flung stories that usually fly under the radar. Check out our 15 favorite projects below. (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) WORKac Arizona House revives the Earthship typology “The desert house typology reached an ending point where it became all about overhangs and metal—a common vocabulary of what a desert house should be,” said Dan Wood, principal of WORKac. “We felt like that needed to be renewed.” The Memphis Movement A slew of new developments suggest Memphis, long plagued by high rates of poverty and unemployment, is on the up-and-up, but is the city really rebounding? Gensler designs a new vision for the unloved Milwaukee Post Office The long, low-slung Milwaukee Post Office is not a popular building, but Gensler's forthcoming revamp will inject much-needed vitality into the more-or-less dead space. Basket builders vacate Ohio’s famous basket building After nearly twenty years, the Longaberger Company, maker of wooden baskets, will be moving out of its trademark Longaberger Medium Market Basket–shaped building in Newark, Ohio. What will happen to the building? $1.9 billion Las Vegas Raiders stadium clears penultimate hurdle The odds for the Oakland Raiders football team’s relocation to Las Vegas are looking very good right about now. Not OKC See what's happening to John Johansen’s Mummers Theater in Oklahoma City. Ford begins work on new $1.2 billion campus in Michigan When Ford Motor Company took stock of its current 60-year-old Dearborn, Michigan, facilities, it became clear that the only way forward would be to take a big leap into two new high-tech campuses. Spearheading the master plans is the Detroit office of SmithGroupJJR. When completed, the estimated $1.2 billon, ten-year project will involve moving 30,000 employees from 70 buildings into a Product Campus and a Headquarters Campus. Throughout the project, the entire campus will also have to stay 100 percent operational. New renderings revealed for ambitious, highway-capping park in Atlanta Buckhead Park Over GA400 is a new park typology for the city. Like most great public places, it’s about creating a series of scaled experiences” for visitors, explained Rob Rogers, principal at Rogers Partners and one of the park's lead designers. The Mexico City designers forging a new path beyond modernism By combining high-design references with homespun folk art, the city's designers are able to create works that are contemporary, but also contextual and artisanal, and that speak to the contested and refined realities of their home city. With a grab bag of contemporary stylistic influences coupled with the methodical pedagogy of their elders, the current generation of designers is quickly moving past the orthodoxy of the city’s Modernismo traditions toward new enterprises that blend design, architecture, and furniture. This year the city hosted Design Week Mexico, and it will be the WorldDesign Capital in 2018—the sixth in the program and the first North American city to be named as such. Shelburne Farms Old Dairy Barn, a Vermont landmark, destroyed by fire Sadly, Vermont lost one of its agrarian and architectural landmarks in September when the historic Old Dairy Barn at Shelburne Farms was destroyed by fire. Saving the Columbus Occupational Health Association Columbus, Indiana is small Midwestern city filled with buildings designed by Eliel Saarinen, Eero Saarinen, I.M. Pei, Kevin Roche, Richard Meier, Harry Weese, César Pelli, Gunnar Birkerts, Robert Venturi, Robert Stern, and many others. Now, its 1973 health center, designed by Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates (HHPA) is for sale. Despite its wealth of modern architecture and a forthcoming biennale, the town has no formal preservation laws, so a sale could mean the destruction or thoughtless modification of this important building. Jean Nouvel eyeing North Adams The home of MassMoCA and the future home of Gluckman Tang's Extreme Model Railroad Museum may be getting a master plan by none other than Jean Nouvel. Residents say Celebration, FL is ruined by mold and shoddy construction Although the Walt Disney Company hired a cadre of leading architects to design Celebration, Florida, the sloppy construction of homes in the theme town is driving residents to grief and financial trouble.
Dallas–Fort Worth Branch Waters Network dovetails with rapid development Architect Kevin Sloan thinks American conceptions of planning and notions of “nature” need to be challenged. His Branch Waters Network project in Dallas aims to do just that. 
A torrent of new projects are reshaping Staten Island Okay, okay—Staten Island is part of New York City, but even in a city of islands, the borough gets no love. Islanders voted to secede in 1993, and city officials say it's too far for nice things like bikeshares. Nevertheless, AN visited this spring to check out some new developments shaping the Forgotten Borough.
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Check out the best of AN Interior

It wouldn’t be an end of year wrap-up without a look at this year’s hottest interior designs. AN Interior is published three times per year by The Architect’s Newspaper and features the top projects, products, designer profiles, and more. Check out the best of AN Interior below! (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) In and Outdoors As people continue to choose urban environments over the lush expanse of the countryside, access to outdoor space has become a luxury amenity for both commercial and residential spaces. Take a look at some of the best vertical gardens, over-sized balconies, expanded courtyards, and green roofs from across the nation. Kitchen Confidential When Daniel Boulud, one of America’s leading chefs, decided to renovate his 2,500 square-foot flat atop his flagship restaurant at 65th and Park Ave., he called in Stephanie Goto to turn his seemingly regular kitchen setup into a culinary studio fit for a maestro. All of the Light In a rare Manhattan home that receives sunlight from all sides, Bryan Young, principal of New York-based Young Projects, devised a stainless-steel screen that can be moved from one side of the Gerken Residence to another, allowing guests to have more restricted or open views. The screen’s design mirrors what Young described as the “plaster core,” a textured volume that houses the back-of-house programmatic elements, which allows the rest of the apartment to be so open. What’s that? It’s Design, Bitches AN Interior took a look at L.A.-based multidisciplinary firm, Design, Bitches, whose keen and self-described interest in pop seeps into their practice from every angle. Check out how co-founders Catherine Johnson and Rebecca Rudolph have seamlessly merged architecture, interior design, and graphic design to create some of L.A.’s trendiest spots. Making Design Easy Do you need to furnish a hotel or a new restaurant? Just call Aito—the latest venture from some of the minds behind Scandinavian design giants Flexhouse, Hem, and One Nordic. Their new company gives designers access to a network of manufacturers that Aito's founders have built through previous endeavors to produce high-quality furniture. Ask Aito to make your product. And then if you want to sell your new product, just ask Aito again. The Finnish Line What happens when two siblings want to build the ultimate eco-friendly home? The Atelier House, located in the woods just 30 miles outside of Helsinki. The brother-sister duo of California and Finland-based Atelje Sotamma used digital fabrication and construction technology to leave a light footprint on the land, to make the infinitely customizable structures of their dream home a reality. Virtual Reality, Minus the Virtual Japanese art collective teamLab debuted an interactive installation this fall that’s like virtual reality without the headset. Twenty different immersive experiences were assembled within a single 20,000 square-foot space in the heart of Silicon Valley for this interactive art extravaganza that sought to make virtual reality a bit more social. Berlin Biennale The 9th Annual Berlin Biennale, The Present In Drag, had much less to do with drag than it did with interior design. The exhibition broke with tradition by acting as a platform for artists to perform the present their work and tease out the contradictions and confusing realities of contemporary culture. There were also a lot of urinals in strange places. Stairway to Heaven When Square moved into the old Bank of America data center in San Francisco, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania-based Bohlin Cywinski Jackson went all out to transform the space from miserable and windowless to open, spacious, modern, and fit for a modern tech company. They might have removed all the cooling towers, but this office is still super chill. Double Trouble The 300-square-foot exhibition space known as Jai & Jai Gallery has become a home for L.A.’s young creatives. Check out some of the coolest projects coming out of the gallery.
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The best book and exhibition reviews of 2016

While not architecture, exhibitions and books are essential to informing, challenging, critiquing, and encouraging designers of all stripes. Here we've gathered some of our best reviews of 2016. (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933–1957 Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston By Christine Cipriani AN Lions: 20 must-see things at the 2016 Venice Biennale Venice Architecture Biennale By William Menking, Matt Shaw, Matthew Messner Detroit in Venice: The U.S. Pavilion at the Venice Biennale Venice Architecture Biennale By Matthew Messner Transitional Object (Psychobarn) Metropolitan Museum of Art By Jimmy Stamp Playboy Architecture, 1953–1979 Elmhurst Art Museum By Andrew Santa Lucia No more weird architecture in Philadelphia: a retroactive manifesto for the AIA National Convention AIA National Convention By Fred Scharmen Ost Und oder West [East and West] P! Gallery By Jesse Seegers Free Roses Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (Mass MoCA) By Ryan John King Palladio Virtuel Yale University Press By Nancy Goldring A Genealogy of Modern Architecture: Comparative Critical Analysis of Built Form Lars Müller Publishers By Carlos Brillembourg Superstudio 50 MAXXI By Peter Lang Early Women of Architecture in Maryland AIA Maryland Gallery By Fred Scharmen The Architecture and Cities of Northern Mexico from Independence to the Present Acanthus Press By Ben Koush What do New Yorkers get when privately-funded public art goes big? By Audrey Wachs Dream of Venice Architecture Bella Figura Publications By Robert Landon Cartographic Grounds: Projecting the Landscape Imaginary Princeton Architectural Press By Ariel Rosenstock Insecurities: Tracing Displacement and Shelter MoMA By Zach Edelson Vertical Urban Factory Actar Publishing By Owen Hatherley Mind Your Mannerisms Jai & Jai Gallery By Antonio Pacheco Slow Manifesto: Lebbeus Woods Blog Princeton Architectural Press By Charles Holland
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Our 12 top building reviews of 2016

The Architect's Newspaper strives to bring you candid and insightful takes on top projects from across the U.S. Here we've gathered some of our best reviews, which range from critical to commending and everything in between. (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) World Trade Center Transit Hub by Santiago Calatrava Architects & Engineers Santiago Calatrava’s WTC Transit Hub opened with much anticipation and mixed reviews. AN reached out to New York’s architects, designers, and engineers to hear their thoughts on the structure. One Santa Fe by Michael Maltzan Architecture Architect Michael Maltzan describes his One Santa Fe as an example of “anticipatory architecture”—exercises in form making that endow architecture with the power to productively shape urban policy, planning, and the city at large. Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA) by Diller Scofidio + Renfro It is impossible to visit the new BAMPFA without inducing comparisons to DS+R's The Broad, even though the two museums—one budget-minded, one blockbuster—share few common approaches and features. 3595 Broadway by Magnusson Architecture and Planning 3595 Broadway’s non-confrontational formal language visualizes critical conditions about how Columbia University positions itself when speaking to their ivy-league-educated audience in their Manhattanville and Medical Center buildings in comparison to the public around their 3595 Broadway building at 148th street. The Salt Shed by Dattner Architects and WXY There's a collection of buildings in a city that always strike one as other, as something not easily reduced to the events of inhabitation. One example in downtown Manhattan that testifies to this quality is lower west side’s new Salt Shed. The Whitney by Renzo Piano Building Workshop A year after the initial “wait and see,” it is time to call the Renzo Piano–designed Whitney building what it really is: An architectural tourist trap. Pico Branch Library by Koning Eizenberg Architecture (KEA) The Pico library branch doesn't privilege one side of its park over the other, and its experiment in neighborhood connectivity is most significant in this spirit of quiet assertion—that a building can possess a multitude of functions, but is only successful in doing so if it remains a place of enjoyment and discovery for everyone. Gordon Parks Arts Hall by Valerio Dewalt Train Associates (VDTA) The University of Chicago features an impressive collection of buildings by notable architects: Holabird & Root, Frank Lloyd Wright, Eero Saarinen, Mies van der Rohe, César Pelli, Rafael Viñoly, Jeanne Gang, and more. In October 2015, Chicago–based Valerio Dewalt Train Associates (VDTA) joined these prestigious ranks with their Gordon Parks Arts Hall, the latest addition to the University of Chicago Laboratory School. The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) by J. Max Bond of Davis Brody Bond, Phil Freelon, David Adjaye, and SmithGroupJJR The NMAAHC truly delivers something that few pieces of architecture can: It is a cascade of metaphors for collectivity, but is also in harmony with its content and program. Roy and Diana Vagelos Education Center of Columbia University Medical Center by Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) Nearly four decades since Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio began the collaboration that today is DS+R, with the Vagelos Center they have completed their most perfectly resolved building, an amalgam of their interests and the lessons learned from earlier projects. Vessel by Thomas Heatherwick When Thomas Heatherwick unveiled his design for a new public landmark called Vessel at Hudson Yards, questions abounded. What is it? What will it do to the neighborhood? And what does it say that Stephen Ross, the president and CEO of Related Companies, the primary developer of Hudson Yards, is financing the entire $250 million piece by himself? Center for Character and Leadership Development (CCLD) at the Air Force Academy by SOM Sited next to Walter Netsch's virtuosic 1963 Cadet Chapel, the CCLD is an artful study in conflict avoidance, restraint, and strategic power projection.
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AN’s hottest critical takes of 2016

This year gave us plenty to complain about, and plenty of debates to weigh in on. Writers from all over the country and many disciplines—from curators to economists—have contributed their knowledge to The Architect's Newspaper (AN), whether in writing or as a precursor to editorials. Here are some of the best editorials and opinion pieces we have published in 2016. You might not agree with all of it, but we hope they are thought-provoking and you enjoy reading them! (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) AIA pledges to work with Donald Trump, membership recoils Upon the election of President-Elect Trump, AIA CEO Robert Ivy issued a statement of solidarity with the newly-minted PEOTUS, mainly in support of his infrastructure spending. Our editorial staff responded with a statement questioning this move, and we solicited reactions from architects within and outside of the AIA. The hybrid article helped elicit a pair of apologies from Ivy, and we kept up on the outpouring of reactions as they came in. How Donald Trump transformed New York without any regard for design quality When The Donald was still one of a cadre of GOP candidates, Editor-in-Chief William Menking took a historical look at the architecture of Trump and the critical reactions it has garnered. Designing the Border Wall? When outrage erupted from the online competition "Building the Border Wall?" and many were discussing the ethics of building such a wall, architect and educator Ronald Rael took a closer look at the nuances of the conditions at the border. Why the Met Breuer Matters When the newly-refurbished Met Breuer opened, Senior Editor Matt Shaw visited the building with Associate Professor and Director of Historic Preservation at Columbia GSAPP Jorge Otero-Pailos to take a look at how it shaped up and what it means for New York. What happened to the MAS? Why has the Municipal Art Society—a once-proud organization with a century and half of history—been handed over to the real estate industry? Female-ness, Corb, and Contraband Architect Andreas Angelidakis and artist Juliana Huxtable's contribution was the first in a series of partnerships between AN and Façadomy, a contemporary journal that reflects on issues of identity through the lenses of art and architecture. Is the U.S.’s Biennale Pavilion actually the Quicken Loans Pavilion? Editor-in-Chief William Menking was less than enthused about the proposals put forth by the curators of the 2016 U.S. Pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Renzo Piano’s Whitney is an architectural “tourist trap” One year after its opening, Senior Editor Matt Shaw reflected on what the new Whitney Museum of American Art brings to the city of New York and its architecture heritage. Architectural education is broken—here’s how to fix it Los Angeles architect Peter Zellner wonders what can be better in architecture education today, and posits a new direction for the academy. Todd Gannon, cultural studies coordinator at SCI-Arc, issued a response to the following article that can be found here. Zellner subsequently launched a school. Respecting the SITE An odd design by an odd choice of architect at SITE Santa Fe raises questions about what the Southwest is really about, says Senior Editor Matt Shaw. Are micro-apartments a revolutionary trend? Or are developers exploiting an out-of-control market? The recent trend of smaller units with more amenities could be part of a solution to the housing crisis, but it has the potential to be a territorial concession for the renting class, says Web Editor Zachary Edelson. How institutionalized racism and housing policy segregated our cities Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute details the history of state-sponsored segregation, focusing on housing policy in the postwar era to today. After Oakland, here’s how architects can help make DIY spaces safer Princeton, New Jersey–based Melissa J. Frost and Seattle-based Susan Surface are initiating a discussion to educate the operators of DIY venues about safety measures to prevent injuries at their spaces. Joel Sanders on the past and future of gender issues in architecture Alessandro Bava of London-based collective åyr sits down with STUD author Joel Sanders to discuss the 20th anniversary of the book and what it means today. What do New Yorkers get when privately-funded public art goes big? Associate Editor Audrey Wachs wonders what the $200 million geegaw at Hudson Yards will offer the city of New York. Hudson River Park/Pier 40 deal reveals the tangled web of calculated collusion that shapes NYC Michael Sorkin "follows the money" to expose a decades-long history of a controversial site on New York's west side.
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Our Buildings of the Year and other Best of Design Awards-winning projects

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it's grown to 26 exciting categories. As in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN Senior Editor Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards.  Scroll below to see this year's winners! Click through to see plenty of images, the honorable mentions, and why the jury picked each project. We'd like to congratulate the winners and hope you can submit your work for consideration next year. (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) 2016 Building of the Year > Midwest: University of Iowa Visual Arts Building by Steven Holl Architects 2016 Building of the Year > East: Grace Farms by SANAA 2016 Building of the Year > Southwest: U.S. Air Force Academy Center for Character and Leadership Development by SOM 2016 Building of the Year > West: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Expansion by Snøhetta 2016 Best of Design Award in Landscape > Private: Modern Vineyard by Jeffrey Gordon Smith Landscape Architecture 2016 Best of Design Award in Architectural Lighting > Outdoor: SteelStacks Campus by L’Observatoire International 2016 Best of Design Award for Young Architects: Steven Christensen Architecture 2016 Best of Design Award in Facade: Vagelos Education Center by DS+R with Gensler 2016 Best of Design Award in Building Renovation: The Strand American Conservatory Theater by SOM 2016 Best of Design Award in Digital Fabrication: XOCO 325 by DDG 2016 Best of Design Award for Student Work: Sensory Pavilion by Dirt Works Studio, University of Kansas 2016 Best of Design Award for Temporary Installation: Rounds by SPORTS 2016 Best of Design Award for Lighting > Indoor: Planned Parenthood Queens by Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design 2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Residential: Clinton Hill Courtyard House by O'Neill McVoy Architects 2016 Best of Design Award for Landscape > Public: Lower Rainier Vista & Pedestrian Land Bridge by GGN 2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Retail/Hospitality: In Situ by Aidlin Darling Design 2016 Best of Design Award for Interior > Workplace: Square, Inc. HQ by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson 2016 Best of Design Award for Residential > Multi-Unit: 400 Grove by Fougeron Architecture 2016 Best of Design Award for Residential > Single Unit: Underhill by Bates Masi + Architects 2016 Best of Design Award for Urban Design: Chicago Riverwalk, Phase 2 by Ross Barney Architects and Sasaki Associates 2016 Best of Design Award for Architectural Representation > Digital: Nine Drawings, Seven Models by NEMESTUDIO 2016 Best of Design Award for Architectural Representation > Analog: Welcome to the 5th Facade by Olson Kundig 2016 Best of Design Award for Adaptive Reuse: National Sawdust by Bureau V 2016 Best of Design Award for Adaptive Restoration: The Cotton Gin at The Co-Op District by Antenora 2016 Best of Design Award for Civic Institution: Architecture of Buffalo Bayou Park by Page 2016 Best of Design Award for Unbuilt > In the Drawers: University of Miami Student Housing Master Plan, Phase 1 by CO Architects 2016 Best of Design Award for Unbuilt > On the Boards: The Menokin Project by Machado Silvetti How Synthesis Design + Architecture and Formlabs crafted this year’s Best of Design Awards Grand Prize. (Courtesy Formlabs) How Synthesis Design + Architecture and Formlabs crafted this year’s Best of Design Awards Grand Prize. (Courtesy Formlabs) How Synthesis Design + Architecture and Formlabs crafted this year’s Best of Design Awards Grand Prize    
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AN’s most popular and widely-shared articles of 2016

Whether breaking news or providing a first-look at major projects, AN is always at the forefront of architectural reporting. And while news of major events—Zaha Hadid's passing, the elimination of the MoMA's design galleries—sent ripples through the architectural profession, sometimes our online articles unexpectedly reach a broader audience—see below for our most popular stories of 2016! (See the rest of our Year in Review 2016 articles here.) The AIA and Donald Trump's Election Soon after the election of Donald J. Trump to the presidency, AIA Executive Vice President and CEO Robert Ivy released a memo containing conciliatory and supportive language for Trump’s infrastructure program, despite the racism, misogyny, and hate employed during his campaign. This sparked an initial outburst of opposition from AIA members, then a first and second apology from Ivy, accompanied by continued outcry from architects. One AIA member resigned in protest and ultimately the AIA Media Relations Director resigned as well. Most recently, one Chicago firm proposed a shining art installation along the Chicago River to address the contentious Trump Tower sign. Zaha Hadid (1950 - 2016) The tragic passing of Iraqi-British architect Zaha Hadid sent shockwaves through the architectural community and beyond. AN helped break the news of her death and shortly followed-up with an obituary and tribute from architect Sir Peter Cook. AN also had the opportunity to interview Hadid in December 2015. BIG in the Bronx Copenhagen and New York–based Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) always makes a splash with its projects, and this was no exception: AN got an exclusive first-look at the three-story, 59-foot-tall, 43,500-square-foot station house for the 40th Precinct in the Bronx’s Melrose neighborhood. Florida's guitar-shaped casino These renderings of the $1.8 billion project planned by Florida’s Seminole tribe went viral on Facebook and proved a favorite among users for months on end. Stadium Stars Much like the casino above, these articles on the Las Vegas/Oakland Raiders' new stadium spread like wildfire: Our initial post in August led to ongoing updates as the project moved closer and closer to fruition, even as Oakland made a last-ditch effort to keep the Raiders. Eliminating the MoMA's architecture and design galleries In April, we broke the news that the MoMA was going to abolish its galleries dedicated to architecture and design. The uproar among architects was swift: The MoMA was one of the few institutions to have a world-class architecture and design collection paired with dedicated galleries. Martino Stierli, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, wrote us an initial response to the criticism, then followed up with a more in-depth interview with AN Editor-in-Chief Bill Menking that July. Prince's Minneapolis estate The sudden death of Prince brought attention to an aspect of the artist that many fans might not have focused on: his history as an architecture patron. AN spoke to California-based BOTO Design Architects to learn more about Prince's Paisley Park complex. Siza matters AN got a first look at Pritzker Prize–winning Portuguese architect Álvaro Siza’s first United States project, a 34-story, 400-foot ultra-luxury residential tower in Midtown Manhattan.