Posts tagged with "Bauhaus":

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Herbert Bayer-designed Aspen Institute will launch a center for Bayer studies

Self-made billionaires Lynda and Stewart Resnick have donated $10 million to establish the Resnick Center for Herbert Bayer Studies on the Aspen Institute campus in Colorado. Bayer, an exemplary figure of the Bauhaus movement in America, designed the institute’s historic campus, originally founded in 1949 as the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies. The new Resnick Center will allow the institute to preserve and showcase Bayer’s art, grow its collection, borrow from other cultural institutions, and create new exhibitions to educate the public about Bayer’s remarkable modernist legacy. The gift is timely as the Institute, and the town of Aspen itself, have been heavily involved in the global celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus movement. “Bayer’s unique creative vision allowed him to capture complex phenomena in their core, simplified elements," said Dan Porterfield, president and CEO of the Aspen Institute. "Inspiring such vision in others is the mission of the Aspen Institute. By demonstrating the ways in which Bayer’s art and architecture contributed profoundly to the development of both the Institute and Aspen, Colorado, this new center will bring the Institute and the community into an even greater relationship, which is one of our highest priorities.” Like Bayer’s work, innovative thinking and problem-solving are central to the Institute. The new center will enhance programming, and visitors will be able to learn the principles of design and creativity and apply those principles to their own work, whether it be art, social improvement, or entrepreneurship. The new center will be architecturally integrated with the remaining grounds, bringing to life Bayer’s vision of the campus as a total work of art. The project is expected to complete in Summer 2022. The Aspen Institute is also a non-profit organization, or “think-tank,” working to build a free, just, and equitable society. As the creation of Walter Peapcke and Herbert Bayer, the Institute was the original home of the International Design Conference at Aspen (IDCA), an ongoing series founded in 1949 to serve as a forum for designers to discuss and disseminate current developments in the related fields of graphic arts, industrial design, and architecture. Lynda and Stewart Resnick are co-owners of The Wonderful Company, a privately held $4.6 billion global company dedicated to agriculture and health through consumer brands like FIJI Water and Wonderful Pistachios. Their philanthropy includes historic gifts to UCLA and LACMA. “As longtime Aspen residents, we have had the opportunity to experience and admire the vision of the great Bauhaus master Herbert Bayer through the work he created in this community," said Lynda Resnick, vice-chair and co-owner of The Wonderful Company. "We are gratified to support the Institute in providing a resource for future generations to appreciate the influence that Bauhaus had on Bayer and consequently on the town of Aspen and the campus of the Aspen Institute, Bayer’s greatest work of art.” 
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AN rounds up must-see exhibitions to catch this summer

Summer is a great time to explore the world of art and architecture, whether through tours of an exquisitely restored historic house or through online exhibitions that celebrate the cutting-edge work of the Bauhaus. Here are some openings you might have missed:

Just: The Architectural League Prize Exhibit

June 21 - July 31, 2019 66 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10011

In an exhibit closing today, The Architectural League of New York has put work by the winners of its 2019 Architectural League Prize on display, a coveted award that has been recognizing promising young architects since 1981. Provocative models, drawings, and installations produced by the six winners have been assembled in the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center at the Parsons School of Design.

The work selected for display covers a wide range of scales and media. With honorees hailing from cities across the United States and Central America, the exhibit gives visitors the opportunity to engage with a diverse array of perspectives and thematic focuses that relate to architecture, urbanism, and the design world at large.

Big Ideas Small Lots

August 1 - November 2, 2019 526 LaGuardia Place New York, NY 10012

Starting tomorrow, New York’s Center for Architecture will exhibit winning submissions from Big Ideas for Small Lots NYC, a competition jointly organized by the NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) and the American Institute of Architects’ New York chapter. The competition asked designers to propose ideas for converting small-scale, difficult-to-develop lots across the city into viable affordable housing. Five finalists, including Palette Architecture and Michael Sorkin Studio, emerged from an initial pool of 444 proposals. The exhibition highlighting their work will be on display from August 1 until November 2.

Changing Signs, Changing Times: A History of Wayfinding in Transit

Through November 6 Grand Central Terminal New York, NY

The New York Transit Museum is hosting an exhibit on wayfinding in its satellite gallery at Grand Central Terminal. On view through November 6, the exhibit includes objects, photographs, and other archival materials exploring the evolution of signage in New York’s transit system. The items, which come primarily from the museum’s own collection, shed light on the changing needs of transit users and the ways in which designers have addressed those needs over time.

The gallery is located just off the Main Concourse in the Shuttle Passage, next to the Station Masters’ Office.

Bauhaus: Building the New Artist

Online

Earlier this summer, the Getty launched an online exhibition as a complement to Bauhaus Beginnings, a gallery exhibit on display at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, California. Planned as a centennial celebration of the Bauhaus’ groundbreaking approach to architectural education, the web-based exhibition features historical images from the Getty’s archives and information about the Bauhaus, as well as opportunities for visitors to test exercises crafted by the school’s pioneering luminaries, including Josef Albers and Vassily Kandinsky.

Dilexi: Totems and Phenomenology

June 22 - August 10, 2019 Parrasch Heijnen Gallery 1326 South Boyle Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90023

Parrasch Heijnen Gallery in Los Angeles is displaying counter-cultural works of art from San Francisco’s Dilexi Gallery, including pieces by Arlo Acton, Tony DeLap, Deborah Remington, Charles Ross, and Richard Van Buren. Much of the art featured in the exhibition, which ranges in media from photography to sculpture, uses nontraditional materials and explores the very nature of perception.

Pope.L: Conquest

September 21, 2019

New York's Public Art Fund will present Pope.L’s most ambitious participatory project yet. Pope.L: Conquest will involve over one hundred volunteers, who will relay-crawl 1.5 miles from Manhattan's West Village to Union Square. According to the Public Art Fund, participants will “give up their physical privilege” and “satirize their own social and political advantage, creating a comic scene of struggle and vulnerability to share with the entire community.”

Pope.L has organized more than 30 performance art projects since 1978, but this will be the largest of the bunch. The crawl will take place on September 21, beginning at the Corporal John A Seravalli Playground.

It Might Be a Place (for LLH), as part of Unfoldingobject

June 20 - August 11, 2019 Concord Center for the Visual Arts 37 Lexington Road Concord, Ma 01742

The Concord Center for the Visual Arts in Massachusetts is displaying an installation by James Andrew Scott as part of its ongoing exhibition Unfoldingobject. Curated by Todd Bartel, the exhibit compiles collages by 50 different artists, each of whom has a distinct interpretation of the medium. Scott’s work, which is integrated into a skylight in the gallery building, presents a dramatic series of irregular pyramids that protrude from the ceiling at different angles. The entire exhibition is on view through August 11.

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Performa 19 probes the Bauhaus's legacies in performance and architecture

For its eighth iteration, the Performa Biennial (Performa 19) will be embodying the radical spirit of the Bauhaus, which celebrates its centennial this year, with performances across New York City. Investigating the confluence of artistic, technological, and political events that birthed the interdisciplinary school in its own day, Performa 19 reframes the 1923 exhibition Art and Technology; The New Unity to consider “what is the art school of the 21st century?” Taking place over the course of three and a half weeks in November, the biennial will include commissions from global artists including Korakrit Arunanondchai, Ed Atkins, Nairy Baghramian, Tarik Kiswanson, Paul Pfeiffer, and Samson Young. There will also be partnerships with numerous other institutions in the collaborative, multidisciplinary spirit of the Bauhaus. “One of Performa’s important roles is to provide critical historical background and context for today’s performances by visual artists,” explained RoseLee Goldberg, founding director and chief curator of Performa. And history, power, and architecture will be taken up by many of the artists. Baghramian, for example, will use dance and theater to investigate the role of the body and gender in architecture and domestic space, while Arunanondchai will create a musical that draws from the Thai tradition of Ghost Cinemas, outdoor movie screenings that began after the Vietnam War as a way for the living and dead to commune among one another. In addition to these new commissions, legendary dancer and choreographer Yvonne Rainer and dance scholar Emily Coates will reconstruct Rainer’s 1965 piece Parts of Some Sextets from materials held at the Getty archives. While we often think of the Bauhaus as a school of architecture and design, Goldberg pointed out that the architecture department was itself slow to launch, yet “a theater department was there at the beginning. [It] took the form of a centralized workshop for exploring cross-disciplinary projects; the drawing department used it to examine movements of the body in space, visual artists and photographers to explore lighting design, and performers and designers to construe fabulous parties, such as the Metal Party.” Drawing upon the department and school's inventive legacy, as well as engaging publications like The Bauhaus Stage, Performa 19 will exhibit how theater at the Bauhaus, and performance more broadly, bridge disciplines and connect bodies and spaces through time. Performa 19 will run from November 1 to November 24, 2019, in New York City.
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Bauhaus bus will travel the world to celebrate the school's centennial

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Bauhaus school by Walter Gropius, a bus modeled after the school’s historic workshop building in Dessau, Germany, will take to the streets worldwide. The miniature version of the modernist building, famous for its stark white volumes, enormous windows, and vertical Bauhaus signage on the narrow end, was designed by the Berlin-based Van Bo Le-Mentzel. Inside the 161-square-foot mobile apartment, dubbed Wohnmaschine (“living house” in German), an exhibition and workshop space will join a miniature reading room full of books about the history of the Bauhaus. The bus kicked off a 10-month-long worldwide tour on January 4 in Dessau outside of its full-size peer. The tour’s goal, according to design group SAVVY Contemporary, who is hosting a series of workshops and panels in the bus, will be to challenge the traditional colonialist narrative that has become intertwined with modernism. The Bauhaus bus and its associated lectures and shared learning are all part of SAVVY’s SPINNING TRIANGLES project, which aims to bring in design philosophies from areas of the world that have been traditionally marginalized. "We will face the relations of coloniality and design as well as its various visibilities and invisibilities," wrote SAVVY Contemporary in a statement. “For too long, practices and narratives from the global South have been kept at the periphery of the design discourse, been ignored altogether, or appropriated. This needs to change. And it can only do so if we start with new forms of learning and unlearning, that may perhaps actually be very old, but have certainly been overheard for far to[o] long.” From January 4 through January 22 the bus will be in Dessau, after which it will depart for Berlin. From January 24 through 27, the bus will be parked in the German capital to coincide with the opening of the 100 Years Bauhaus festival. After that, the mobile school will go abroad and land in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Through forums and dialogues with design professionals in Kinshasa, a view of a collective modernity will be established. Five “masters” will take back what they’ve learned from Kinshasa to SAVVY Contemporary’s Berlin office to educate 40 students on their findings from July 22 to August 18. The bus’s final destination is the Para Site art space in Hong Kong, where the findings from its past trips can be expanded on.
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Traveling to Berlin? Here are some of our top picks for the design-minded

For those who want to take in history, design, and nightlife, Berlin is the place. Visiting and want to take in some of the sights and sounds? Or on a trip for the Bauhaus centennial? The city has something to offer everyone, and AN has compiled a list of what those with design on the brain should check out. The Chipperfield Kantine Joachimstrasse 11 10119 Berlin Mitte Rosenthaler Platz The office of English architect David Chipperfield is inside of a converted piano factory in Mitte. The redbrick building sits behind a spare, bright white courtyard where the architect has designed a beautifully detailed concrete box that also houses the restaurant Kantine. A reasonably priced menu of fresh local products served on spare Chipperfield-designed tableware—it is the best lunch spot in the city. Trouvé Schwedter Strasse 9 10119 Berlin trouve-berlin.de This store is a fantasyland of objects for architects and designers. Its owners, Michel Vincenot and Sabine Riedel, source lighting, seating, storage, tables, and graphics by preeminent European designers of the 20th century: Carlo Scarpa, Gio Ponti, Achille Castiglioni, Christian Dell, and German designers from the Bauhaus. This Wilhelm Wagenfeld glass tea service is 200 euros (approximately $233). Hotel Oderberger Oderberger Strasse 57 10435 Berlin hotel-oderberger.berlin A Neo-Renaissance-style hotel over a 19th-century public swimming pool makes this a very Berlin experience. It’s reasonably priced, and surrounded by cafes, bars, the trendy shopping street Kastanienallee, and Mauerpark. The park is also a unique “free park” where all sorts of public gatherings go on through the night, and the grass is untended, as Berliners don’t want chemicals used to maintain any public landscape. Topography of Terror topographie.de Berlin has multiple reminders of its fraught and charged history. Peter Eisenman’s Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe and Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum are powerful design statements, but equally powerful and less well known is the Topography of Terror Museum. On the site of what was once the headquarters of the Nazi Secret State Police, SS, and Reich Security, it was designed in 2010 by Ursula Wilms and landscape architect Heinz Hallmann. It is a truly frightening architectural experience. The Paris Bar Kantstrasse 152 10623 Berlin parisbar.net A bright red neon sign over the entrance announces The Paris Bar, the legendary Charlottenburg late night art bar. Its walls are covered with art from its regular patrons. Several years ago, it had to auction off its Martin Kippenberger for $3 million to pay back taxes. It’s the Odeon of Berlin, and its steak frites are the best in the city—but unlike its New York counterpart, it can’t make a decent martini. Pauly Saal at Jewish School for Girls Auguststrasse 11–13 10117 Berlin paulysaal.com maedchenschule.org Alexander Beer was the chief architect for the Jewish community of Berlin, and in 1927 he designed a girls’ school at Auguststrasse 11-13 in Mitte. It is a rare example of the modernist Neue Sachlichkeit style, with beautifully crafted materials. The school was eventually closed, Beer died in a concentration camp, and the building was confiscated by the government. The school was repurposed in 2012 as the Center for Art and Dining Culture, which is open to the public. Besides art galleries, it holds a New York delicatessen, Mogg & Melzer, and the pricey but excellent Pauly Saal Restaurant.
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Controversy rocks the Bauhaus Dessau

Bauhaus Day 1: I arrived in Weimer the Thuringian birthplace of the Bauhaus in Germany to celebrate the design schools 100th birthplace in 1919. My plane landed in Frankfort in time to receive a message from Dutchman Bart Lootsema asking if had heard about the Bauhaus controversy just now breaking in German newspapers? No, I hadn’t heard but was headlines on every Germany journal and on everyone lips on the German government sponsored trip.
A punk band known for is political views was scheduled to perform at the Bauhaus in Dessau but was the event was canceled by transition politicians, in some ways echoes the Bauhaus historical legacy and now a protest is circulating worldwide to protest the cancellation—what a way to start an international press event! The blog outlet ArtNet now reports that “more than 100 prominent curators, artists, and other art-world figures have signed an open letter condemning the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation’s decision to cancel an anti-right-wing punk group’s performance on the grounds that the institution was 'apolitical.'” The protest signers claim the “foundation has done serious damage to democracy and cultural life “ and “that the decision to cancel the show was made following demands by the center-right CDU and nationalist AFD party, as well as extreme right groups.” All of these events are happening just as the German government is promoting the Bauhaus anniversary also recalls political events that roiled the Bauhaus during much of its existence first in Weimer and then Dessau.
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The Bauhaus's work in the Soviet Union gets a retrospective in Moscow

As part of the 100th anniversary of Germany’s groundbreaking Bauhaus school, the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow is exhibiting Moving Away: The Internationalist Architect through November 30, 2018. Moving Away is presented as part of the multi-national bauhaus imaginista project that tracks the influence of the Bauhaus in different countries. At the Garage Museum, the legacy of the Bauhaus in the Soviet Union will be on display. Moving Away will use drawings, letters, notes, diagrams, plans, and photographs of Bauhaus students and educators in Moscow to contextualize their (and their movement’s) relationships with socialism and communism, Moscow itself, and the Soviet Union. Those connected to the second Bauhaus director, architect Hannes Meyer, will be given a particular focus: architect Lotte Stam-Beese, urban planner Konrad Püschel, and architect Philipp Tolziner. Through the examination of these personal materials, Moving Away seeks to humanize the history of modernist utopian design. Although the Bauhaus only lasted from 1919 to 1933, after which the school was unceremoniously closed by the Nazi party, the modernist institution and its ethos of bridging the divide between fine art and architecture had an outsize effect on design history, and Moving Away is far from the only centennial celebration planned. For Moving Away, the Garage Museum asked contemporary artists and theorists to contextualize and respond to the aforementioned archival materials. The show will present the original documents, as well as the responses from theorist Doreen Mende, artist Alice Creischer, and researchers Tatiana Efrussi and Daniel Talesnik. The architecture and design studio Kooperative für Darstellungspolitik handled the exhibition design. Bauhaus imaginista was organized with cooperation from the Bauhaus Kooperation Berlin Dessau Weimar, Goethe-Institut, and Haus der Kulturen der Welt, and pulls together archival material from Bauhaus Archive Berlin, the Bauhaus Dessau Archive, the German Architecture Museum Frankfurt (DAM), the Institute for the History and Theory of Architecture at ETH Zurich, and the Netherlands Architecture Institute, according to the Garage Museum.
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Marcel Breuer's Central Atlanta Library to feature light show on its facade

Marcel Breuer’s dark and boxy Central Atlanta Library will literally light up this fall with projected images chronicling the city’s hip-hop and experimental music scene. Curbed Atlanta reported that URBANSCREEN, an artist collective from Germany, will design a light show on the Brutalist building’s hulking facade beginning October 5. The 250,000-square-foot concrete public library is situated at the corner of Forsyth and Williams Streets and is currently undergoing a controversial $50 million renovation by local firm Cooper Carry. URBANSCREEN’s “Superposition” installation will bring temporary color and motion to the exterior as part of the Goethe-Institut’s “Lightart Meets German Architecture” project. In partnership with the organization, the artists will illuminate two other iconic German-American pieces of architecture outside of Atlanta: the Athenaeum in Indianapolis and the German ambassador’s residence in Washington, D.C. Not only is the project a celebration of these enduring buildings, but it is also a chance to reflect on the history of German architecture in the U.S. and what that means to the countries’ relationship today, according to URBANSCREEN. For Atlanta, digital art, dance, and music will be integrated within the project “to unite several universal languages that transcend geographical definitions,” says a press release cited by Curbed. In an interview with the Goethe-Institut, the URBANSCREEN team described their inspiration for the projection on the Atlanta library. “We first had an entirely different idea, but then changed our minds completely when we arrived on site,” said Majo Ussat. “Now we are presenting a highly graphical projection in collaboration with local youth groups who will dance hip-hop—a kind of 'Bauhaus meets hip-hop.'" The team will install four projectors around the library, some in a nearby building and on the roof of a gallery, since the surrounding block is too tight to set them up efficiently. Per Curbed Atlanta, the event will also include a street festival replete with food and beer trucks. The revamp of the Central Library, as well as the light show, signals a rededication to the historic architecture scene of Atlanta. Back in 2016, the city was considering demolishing the building, but local and national preservationists came to the rescue. Cooper Cary’s retrofit will transform 50,000 square feet of the library into private, leasable space in an attempt to enhance its program. On August 24, the site was unanimously voted to the National Register of Historic Places as well as the Georgia Register of Historic Places by the Georgia National Register Review Board.
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Pratt exhibit showcases three influential but undersung 20th-century designers

Pratt Institute's Manhattan Gallery is hosting a chronological exhibition of the work of three 20th-century designers whose careers spanned most of the modernist era. The roughly two-month-long show covers the work of Anni Albers, Elaine Lustig Cohen, and Rosmarie Tissi, three designers whose lives crossed paths with famous men but who were successful in their own right. In chronological order, Albers, Lustig Cohen, Tissi, 1958-2018 highlights typography, prints, sculptures, books, paintings, and more from the three practitioners, who tended to produce highly geometric forms across media. Lustig Cohen learned graphic design from Alvin Lustig, her first husband, who would dictate his ideas to her after he lost his sight. She did the typography for Philip Johnson's Seagram Building, and is known for her large geometric paintings from the 1970s. Albers, meanwhile, was an influential textile designer for the Bauhaus, and later emigrated to the United States, where she taught at the Black Mountain School (1933-49). Though many may know her as the wife of artist and educator Josef Albers, she was the first designer ever to get a solo show at MoMA, in 1949. Tissi is the only surviving member of the group. She founded O&T (Odermatt & Tissi), her eponymous studio with Siegfried Odermatt, in 1968, and she is still in practice today. Tissi designed the poster for the show, pictured at top. Albers, Lustig Cohen, Tissi, 1958-2018, which runs from March 2 to April 28, is curated by graphic designer Phillip Niemeyer, who also directs Northern-Southern, a gallery and art agency in Austin, Texas. An opening reception is scheduled for March 1 from 6 p.m.–8 p.m.; more information on the exhibition can be found here.
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Preservation grants to give these 12 modern buildings a future

The Getty Foundation has unveiled the beneficiaries of this year’s Keeping It Modern architectural conservation grant initiative, a program run by the foundation that aims to support projects of “outstanding architectural significance." The grants are awarded to ongoing conservation projects that promise to “advance conservation practice” with regard to modern and contemporary architectural relics. According to the foundation, many modern and contemporary works of architecture were built using experimental materials, untested building strategies, or were repaired badly over the decades. Consequently, contemporary preservation and stabilization strategies are urgently needed to prepare many modern structures for the future.   The grant initiative, which began in 2014, mostly focuses on providing funding for research and study purposes. It aims to fill in funding gaps for threatened structures, allowing their owners and operators to commission preservation, structural, or renovation studies. The initiative has afforded 45 such grants since its inception. This year's buildings span the globe and includes works in Japan, Morocco, India, and Kosovo. Here are the 12 projects that are sharing $1.66 million in grant funding: Cathedral Church of St. Michael, Coventry Cathedral Sir Basil Spence Coventry, England Built: 1962 Funds Awarded: $174,530 The Coventry Church of St. Michael by Sir Basil Spence was designed in 1962 as part of the post–World War II reconstruction effort in England. The original 500-year-old Gothic church was almost entirely destroyed during the war with only the structure’s outer walls, tower, and spire remaining intact. Spence’s plan called for saving these components and surrounding them with new construction. Spence added red sandstone walls, slender concrete columns, and gentle vaulting to complement the historic character of the original church. The church has been in constant use for over 50 years; The Getty Foundation’s grant will help the current church architect consult with conservation specialists on the creation of a comprehensive conservation management plan for the structure that will allow for repairs to take place. City of Boston, Boston City Hall Kallmann McKinnell & Knowles Boston Built: 1968 Funds Awarded: $120,000 Boston’s iconic Brutalist city hall was designed by Gerhard Kallmann, Michael McKinnell, and Edward Knowles in 1962. The controversial structure has enjoyed a resurgence of popularity in recent years as Brutalist architecture has come back in vogue. The functioning civic building has suffered over the decades from various types of water infiltration, faulty concrete joinery, and other ailments; however, restoration efforts are currently under way. Grant funding will be used to evaluate the building and its attendant plaza, perform laboratory analysis of the concrete elements, and plan for the long term conservation of the building and its systems. Fondation Caisse de Dépôt et de Gestion (CDG), Sidi Harazem Thermal Bath Complex Jean-François Zevaco Sidi Harazem, Morocco Built: 1958 Funds Awarded: $150,000 The Sidi Harazem Thermal Bath Complex was built in the years following Moroccan independence from French colonial dominance and represented the new nation’s desire to “create modern and forward-thinking gathering spaces,” according to the Getty Foundation. The Moroccan-born French architect Jean-François Zevaco designed the complex in 1957 as a series of bungalows and a market surrounding a central courtyard. The complex fell into disrepair by the 1980s; these sections have been permanently closed since. The Fondation Caisse de Dépôt et de Gestion—the group that owns the structure—will use Getty funds to create a conservation plan for the site that will guide future interventions with the eventual goal of fully restoring the entire complex. Japan Sport Council, Yoyogi National Gymnasium Kenzo Tange Tokyo, Japan Built: 1964 Funds Awarded: $150,000 The Yoyogi National Gymnasium was designed in 1964 by Japanese architect Kenzo Tange as part of Japan’s bid to host the first-ever Olympic Games in Asia. The pioneering Metabolist structure is made up of a shell-shaped concrete exoskeleton that curves between the structure’s raked seating assemblies and a large spire. The structure has been continuously in use since and is being readied in preparation for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games when it will be used for indoor sports competitions. The grant money will be used to develop one of the first conservation management plans for a modern building in Japan, according to the Getty, and will also go toward studying the building’s materials, possible upgrades, and history. Middle East Technical University, Faculty of Architecture Building Altuğ Çinici and Behruz Çinici Ankara, Turkey Built: 1963 Funds Awarded: $100,000 The Middle East Technical University Faculty of Architecture Building—located in Ankara and designed by the architect couple Altuğ Çinici and Behruz Çinici in 1963— is considered among the best examples of modern architecture in Turkey. The complex originally housed administrative offices and the university library but was converted in 1966 to house the university's Faculty of Architecture, though the International Style complex has deteriorated over the years due to its earthquake-prone location. The university will use grant funding to create a prototype restoration and conservation plan for the buildings that can be used to raise public awareness regarding the preservation of Turkey’s modern architecture across the country. Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand (MASP), Museo de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand Lina Bo Bardi São Paulo, Brazil Built: 1968 Funds Awarded: $ 150,000 The Museu de Arte de São Paulo Assis Chateaubriand (MASP) is an iconic work of Brazil’s strain of regional modernism by architect Lina Bo Bardi. The museum’s gallery spaces are lifted 26 feet above a large plaza by heroic concrete arches. The 110,000-square-foot building has suffered from water infiltration issues, concrete spalling, and structural problems over the years. Though those concerns have been addressed in previous updates, more work is needed and a long-term plan is lacking. Grant monies will go toward mapping out a long-term conservation approach for the structure that will integrate preservation and maintenance concerns for the building. NVA (Europe) Limited, St Peter’s Seminary Andy MacMillan and Isi Metzstein (Gillespie, Kidd & Coia architectural practice) Glasgow, Scotland Built: 1966 Funds Awarded: $148,120 Newly-conducted research and visioning have helped to outline a future for Andy MacMillan and Isi Metzstein’s St. Peter’s Seminary in Glasgow, Scotland. The complex has been abandoned since the 1970s and was placed on the World Monuments Fund’s 2008 list of most endangered cultural landmarks. In the years since, a plan to stabilize and convert the rough and geometric Brutalist complex into a performance space, cultural venue, and exhibition center has materialized. Before that can happen, the structure must be cataloged and mapped. Using grant money, researchers will delve into the various states of decay for each of the structure’s pre-cast concrete panels, analyze the building’s structural frame, and perform a series of test repairs and mock-ups to guide the building's future conservation. PEC University of Technology, Government Museum and Art Gallery Le Corbusier (Charles- Édouard Jeanneret) Chandigarh, India Built: 1968 Funds Awarded: $150,000 Le Corbusier’s Government Museum and Art Gallery in Chandigarh, India is considered one of the architect’s master works. The structure was developed in partnership with Pierre Jeanneret as a test of their so-called “Museum of Unlimited Growth” concept, a modular approach based on a spiraling nautilus that could be added onto indefinitely. The building is in decent shape but requires long-term repairs to better adapt the structure to its local climate. Grant funding will be used to develop a research-based conservation and management plan that will aim to catalog urgent conservation repairs and establish a maintenance strategy. Price Tower Arts Center, Price Tower Frank Lloyd Wright Bartlesville, Oklahoma Built: 1956 Funds Awarded: $75,000 Price Tower in Bartlesville, Oklahoma is a 19-story skyscraper designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright. An early example of the luxury condo tower, the building was first developed to house upscale residential and commercial functions. The building remained in use in its original configuration until 1981 when it was sold to Phillips Petroleum, which converted the structure to office functions. The complex was donated to the Price Tower Arts Center organization in 2002 and has been partially restored and renovated. The building became a National Historic Landmark in 2007; received funds will be used to develop a comprehensive, holistic management plan. Schusev State Museum of Architecture, Melnikov House Konstantin Melnikov Moscow, Russia Built: 1929 Funds Awarded: $120,000 The Melnikov House designed by Konstantin Melnikov in 1929 as the architect’s family home and studio. The structure is heralded as a key work of the Soviet avant-garde movement in architecture and remained in the architect’s family until 2006. The structure was transferred to the state in 2011 and now operates as a museum containing 14,000 objects. The barreled structure is studded with 64 honeycomb-shaped windows that let soft light into the building’s interiors and are based on principles of structural and material efficiency. The building will soon suffer from its own success—the projected number of visitors to the museum has created long-term preservation issues. Grant funding will aim to address these concerns while also performing technical research on the building’s roof, mechanical, and electrical systems, among other aspects. Stiftung Bauhaus Dessau, Bauhaus building Walter Gropius Dessau, Germany Built: 1925 Funds Awarded: $160,047 The Dessau Bauhaus building, designed by Walter Gropius in 1925, is one of the most iconic modern structures left in existence. The sprawling structure exemplifies the modern movement’s approach to compartmentalized programming and exhibits a clear structural expression of modern materials like steel, concrete, and ribbon glass. The progressive art and architecture school was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996 and operates as a museum and research center today. Funding will be directed toward consolidating the site’s historical and technical records into a comprehensive database to “guide and prioritize future interventions,” according to the Getty. This effort will be complemented by efforts to analyze character-defining features like the building’s steel windows, nickel-plated fixtures, and some of the building’s legacy materials. Universitá degli Studi di Roma “La Sapienza,” Stadio Flaminio Pier Luigi Nervi Rome, Italy Built: 1960 Funds Awarded: $161,000 Pier Luigi Nervi’s Stadio Flaminio is a canonical work of post-World War II modern architecture in Italy. The structurally-expressive, thin-shelled concrete structure was constructed in advance of the 1960 Rome Olympic Games. The 45,000-seat stadium was originally designed for sporting events but was often utilized as a performance and soccer venue as well. It was in use until 2011 when the stadium was decommissioned by the Municipality of Rome. The municipality is currently pursuing a conservation plan for the complex and will aim to study the building’s structural stability and innovative materials.
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Bauhaus Master Oskar Schlemmer-inspired performance coming to Mana Contemporary in New Jersey

German artist Oskar Schlemmer may be popularly known for his paintings, but at the Bauhaus he was the Master of Forum at their theater program—and he produced some unforgettable costumes and performances. Look no further than this modern rendition of his Triadic Ballet (Triadisches Ballett). Now, a performance inspired by Schlemmer's Triadic Ballet is coming to the Mana Contemporary space in Jersey City, New Jersey nightly from November 19 to November 22. The performance—dubbed Virtually There—has been curated by Roya Sachs and Mafalda Millies, both Performa Visionaries (Performa is a non-profit arts organization and proceeds from the show will go toward its ongoing efforts to support live performances). The costumes of Virtually There were crafted by the Campana brothers, two Brazilian designers renowned for their ability to re-use and recycle materials in their works. Those interested can find tickets here; the website says shuttles are available to and from Mana Contemporary.
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Harvard Art Museums launch new online resource on the Bauhaus

Bauhaus, a new digital resource devoted to the influential school of art and design, gives users access to more than 32,000 objects from across the 14 years that the Bauhaus existed. The collection includes textiles, photographs, class notes, paintings, and ephemera by the likes of Josef and Ani Albers, Marcel Breuer, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, László Moholy-Nagy, and others. The objects were originally gathered by Bauhaus founder and Harvard professor Walter Gropius to help demonstrate the influence the school had on American design. The digital collection will lead to a major exhibition in 2019, which is the centennial anniversary of the Bauhaus. “The Busch-Reisinger Museum’s Bauhaus-related holdings make up nearly three-fourths of its total collection,” said Lynette Roth, Daimler curator of the Busch-Reisinger Museum at the Harvard Art Museums in a press release. There are currently five sections to the collection: “Holdings,” which groups the artifacts by media, discipline, theme, designer, etc., “The Bauhaus and Harvard,” an essay that explains the relationship between the two schools, an annotated map of Boston that marks the institutions and architectural points of interest related to Gropius and the Bauhaus, a chronology of the school’s activities, and a bibliography of archives, exhibitions, and other resources. “We wanted to create a central place to organize the Harvard Art Museums’ Bauhaus materials to help students, scholars, and the public find their way through the collections and discover new artists and objects,” said Robert Wiesenberger, the 2014–16 Stefan Engelhorn curatorial fellow in the Busch-Reisinger Museum at the Harvard Art Museums in a press release. “In short,” Wiesenberger added, “to make good on the founding promise of this being a study collection.”