Posts tagged with "bar":

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OMFGCO’s Hideout bar offers a riotous nod to Hawaiian modernism

With a tropical twist on Marmoreal by Dzek, the new Hideout bar by creative design agency OMFGCO at the Laylow hotel in Waikiki, Hawaii, is simply this: a riot.
A riot of textures. A riot of patterns. A riot of stylistic references wrapped up and rolled into one indoor-outdoor bar and restaurant that surfs a tropicalia-tinged wave of maximal eclecticism. The watering hole is set in a revamped 1960s-era modernist hotel that was renovated and rebranded by OMFGCO with help from San Francisco–based Randolph Designs, who collaborated on the interiors and created furniture for the hotel’s 251 guest rooms. OMFGCO handled branding, interior design, and art direction for the project’s public spaces, deploying a highly curated set of self-consciously referential design elements to promote familiarity and style. Using playful repetition and a no-holds-barred, mood board–focused approach for the project, the designers generated spaces that pay tribute to popular tropical tropes, like birds of paradise, hula bobblehead dolls, and straw-backed chairs, in playful, raucous ways.
The project, according to Fritz Mesenbrink, cofounder and creative director at OMFGCO, is heavily inspired by the work of Hawaiian modernist architect Vladimir Ossipoff—and it shows in the crisp, low lines of the bar, the peek-through screened entry, and the rough-hewn materiality of each of the spaces. A bamboo entry deck is situated at the face of the Hideout, where a bobblehead-backed reception desk and waiting lounge also sit. Here, a 100-foot-long terra-cotta breezeblock wall designed by Spanish architect Patricia Urquiola for Mutina and collections of potted tropical plants create an area that sits both outside and within the hotel tower. The lounge areas, like the remaining parts of the bar and restaurant located beyond, are scattered with lounge furniture, some of the pieces hand-picked by OMFGCO’s design team from vintage collections, others were specifically made for the project. The bar and restaurant spaces within hold even more special furniture, including vintage Arthur Unano barstools that run parallel to beadboard paneling and countertops made out of Marmoreal—an engineered marble stone aggregate that resembles terrazzo—along the bar. The L-shaped bar is backed by cabinets that incorporate Marmoreal shelving as well, serving to highlight the “modern tiki” theme the designers sought. Mesenbrink said, “The Umanoff barstools are probably my personal favorite piece of furniture at the Laylow. We had to gather them from all over the country and a few from overseas, then had them touched up to feel new again.” Leafy, hand-painted wallpaper murals by Michael Paulus and an accent wall populated by a field of drink umbrellas fill out the lobby areas, which connect the bar to a small restaurant packed with wicker seats and a wraparound booth. Beyond the restaurant? A poolside veranda—called a lanai—containing conical fire pits, drink stands, and sand-filled floors.
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Take a tour of New York’s marble-wrapped Oscar Wilde bar

The building housing Oscar Wilde, a new bar at 45 West 27th St. in Manhattan’s NoMad district, was once the headquarters of New York City’s Bureau of Prohibition and the mob, whose members reportedly listened in on federal agents there. With 300 whiskeys and 32 beers on tap, many sourced from New York State, Oscar Wilde’s 118.5-foot-long bar—one of the longest in the city—is the centerpiece of the entire 5,874-square-foot space, starting from the front, near the entrance, and eventually wrapping around the back wall. Designed and commissioned by owners Tommy Burke and Frank McCole, the bar consists of a top of white Italian Carrara marble, while the base is gray-green, ornately carved, Victorian-inspired Connemara marble from Ireland. The entire bar was carved by hand in Vietnam. Carved stone can be found elsewhere throughout Oscar Wilde: on the hostess desk directly inside the front door, as well as on what McCole calls “belly bars,” individual bars with round tops where patrons can stand and drink. McCole and Burke spent five years collecting the wonderfully eclectic works of art, stained glass, and furniture that cover almost every square inch of every surface of Oscar Wilde, making between 30 and 40 trips to Ireland, the British Isles, and France to find objects for sale at old estates and auctions. They even uncovered European antiques, such as the oak door of the restroom on the ground floor, in Argentina. Scattered throughout—on many carved elements, in the windows, on some walls—are direct quotations from Wilde’s writings. The bar officially opened August 15, with C3D Architecture as the architects of record.
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Home Studios brings luminous art nouveau to a Brooklyn cocktail bar

A certain type of Brooklynite has, in the past five years, done at least one of the following: lined up for pizza at Paulie Gee’s; caught a movie at Syndicated; and raced to happy hour at Ramona, Sisters, or Manhattan Inn. Even if none of those names ring a bell, chances are, if you’ve been out and about anywhere in North Brooklyn, then you’re already familiar with Home Studios, the firm behind these and Elsa, their newest addition to the Brooklyn bar scene. Elsa, a cocktail bar with subtly exuberant art nouveau flair, recently opened in Cobble Hill.

The creative firm actually designed the bar’s first Manhattan spot in 2008, though Elsa 1.0 closed three years ago. For the new Elsa on Atlantic Avenue, the client wanted to keep the ethos of the original East Village bar intact: “We loved the design of the original Elsa and wanted to reimagine the new space in a way that kept the essence of the Manhattan location, but with greater sophistication,” said principal Oliver Haslegrave.

“To that end, we experimented with every design element in the space, from the interior architecture to abstract material combinations of plaster, mirror, leather, and marble.” That is not an exaggeration. Home Studios designed the light fixtures, doors, banquettes, tables, shelving for the bottles behind the bar, cocktail tables, and stools—with much of the work completed in its in-house shop. It’s all in a day’s work for the firm, which specializes in highly customized interiors.

Here, everything glows, especially in contrast to the busy street outside. Deep burgundy booths with marble-and-brass tables line a wall opposite the bar, with a mirrored surface that reflects liquor bottles displayed on staggered dendritic steel displays. The space is inspired in part by Jean Royère’s voluptuous furniture, and is named for Elsa Schiaparelli, the spirited 20th-century fashion designer behind the Tears dress and manicure gloves.

Since its founding in 2009, the Brooklyn-based firm has completed 30 projects, from New York to L.A. to New Orleans, and it has at least another 10 coming up, including two in Philadelphia and one in Memphis, Tennessee. For those who just can’t get enough of its work, Home Studios is launching a furniture line called (what else?) Homework, out this May.