Posts tagged with "Awards":

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PennDesign receives $1.25 million gift for architecture prizes

For school alumni, solicitation emails from the alumni office usually elicit groans, not checks. University of Pennsylvania School of Design alum Lori Kanter Tritsch (M.Arch. '85) took a slightly different approach, pledging $1.25 million to her alma mater to establish two prizes for architects. It is the largest single donation for fellowships the school has ever received. Kanter Tritsch is a career architect who sits on the school's Board of Overseers. She made the pledge with her longtime partner, William P. Lauder, the executive chairman of cosmetics giant Estée Lauder, who is also a University of Pennsylvania alum. Part of Kanter Tritsch's gift will establish a $50,000 fellowship for "the most promising graduate architecture student at PennDesign." This fellowship, dubbed the Kanter Tritsch Prize in Energy and Architectural Innovation, will be awarded yearly to a second-year M.Arch. student who demonstrates a thoughtful approach to the issues of "energy, ecology, and/or social equity." The gift will also establish the Kanter Tritsch Medal for Excellence in Architecture and Environmental Design, an award for practicing architects whose work has been under-recognized but who "changed the course of design history," particularly in their approach to energy, environment, and diversity. Current PennDesign faculty aren't eligible. Juries for the fellowship and medal will be led by Winka Dubbeldam, professor and chair in school's Department of Architecture as well as the founder of Archi-Tectonics. In a prepared statement, Dubbeldam complimented the gift's role in highlighting under-appreciated work: "The architecture profession can be slow to recognize young talent. At the same time, many established architects never receive the public recognition they deserve." The juries will be announced this fall, and the first set of winners will be announced in the fall of 2018.
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The Architectural League of New York announces 2017 Norden Fund recipients

The Architectural League of New York has announced the two winners of its 2017 Deborah J. Norden Fund, a travel grant that was established in 1995. The grant is awarded to students and recent graduates in the fields of architecture, architectural history, and urban studies.

This year, Kevin Malawski for Pikionis’ Pathway: Paving the Acropolis and Priyanka Shah for Deep Skins: Roger Anger’s Facade Operations were the recipients of the grant. They will both receive $5,000 to use for travel and study.

Malawski, who currently works at New York–based EwingCole, will travel to Athens, Greece to explore the relationship between modern planning principles and regional sensitivity. Through sketches, photographs, and diagrams, his project revolves around the intricacies of Dimitris Pikionis’s five-kilometer, mid-20th-century pathway to the Acropolis. Located within olive tree groves to frame vistas, the mosaic-paved walkways also include gutters and trenches to divert water from seasonal downpours (a result of the Mediterranean climate). Malawski hopes to fill an academic void for Pikionis' architecture, which “employs a mix of operative regionalist undertones with modernism to define a space which authentically relates to the ancient Acropolis it is sited on,” he said.  

Shah, who is an architectural designer with international firm Grimshaw Architects, will go to Paris and Grenoble, France to document Roger Anger’s high-rise residential buildings, specifically looking at the geometric articulations and arrangements. Anger, an influential French architect in the 1950s and 60s, became known for his buildings' facades which present “a direct antecedent to contemporary computational design.” Upon his death, the majority of his works were kept with his estate and remain inaccessible to the public. Shah will consult archives and visit his buildings to create a comprehensive, digitized monograph of his designs.

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American Academy in Rome announces 2017 Rome Prize winners

The American Academy in Rome announced its winners for the 2017–18 Rome Prize, a fellowship that supports advanced independent work and research in the arts and humanities. This year’s 29 recipients will receive a stipend, workspace, and living space at the Academy’s 11-acre campus in Rome to pursue further work among peers. Winners are selected annually through a national competition process and evaluated by an independent jury of scholars and artists. Highlighted below are the individuals that won the prizes for architecture, design, historic preservation and conservation, and landscape architecture. Architecture Founders Rome Prize Brandon Clifford Assistant Professor, School of Architecture and Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ghosts of Rome Arnold W. Brunner/Katherine Edwards Gordon Rome Prize Keith Krumwiede Visiting Associate Professor, Department of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Associate Professor, College of Architecture and Design, New Jersey Institute of Technology A Pattern Book of Houses for a World After the End of Work Design Mark Hampton Rome Prize Jennifer Birkeland and Jonathan A. Scelsa Partners, op.AL The Roman Roof-Scape—The Atrium as Landscape–Urban Infrastructure Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Rome Prize Tricia Treacy Assistant Professor, Graphic Design, Department of Art, Appalachian State University modes + methods of dialog + collaboration Historic Preservation and Conservation Charles K. Williams II Rome Prize Lisa Deleonardis Austen-Stokes Professor, Department of the History of Art, John Hopkins University A Transatlantic Response to Worlds That Shake: Jesuit Contributions to Anti-Seismic Building Design in Early Modern Italy and Peru Booth Family Rome Prize Liz Ševčenko Director, Humanities Action Lab, The New School + Rutgers University–Newark Confronting Denial: Preservation for a Post-Truth Era Landscape Architecture Garden Club of America Rome Prize Rosetta S. Elkin Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University; Associate, Arnold Arboretum Shorelines: The Case of Italian Stone Pine Prince Charitable Trusts/Rolland Rome Prize Alison B. Hirsch AND Aroussiak Gabrielan Co-founders, foreground design agency, Los Angeles, California; Hirsch: Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture + Urbanism, School of Architecture, University of Southern California; Gabrielian: Ph.D. Candidate in Media Arts + Practice, School of Cinematic Arts, University of Southern California Rome Real-and-Imagined: Cinematic Fictions and Future Landscapes For more on the 2017–2018 Rome Prize winners, see this list here. For more on the American Academy in Rome, see its website here.
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2017 Docomomo US Modernism in America Awards winners announced

The 2017 winners have been announced for the Docomomo US Modernism in America Awards, a program that highlights the importance of preserving modernist architecture, landscape, and design across the country. The winners this year feature projects that have faced threats of demolition but have been restored. In one case, a project was demolished but its dispute is headed to the state's Supreme Court in a precedent-setting case on preservation. The awards also celebrate the people and organizations working to preserve, restore, and rehabilitate these buildings and spaces. The 2017 Modernism in America Awards will be formally awarded on October 6, 2017, at the Design Within Reach Third Avenue Studio in New York City. Here is this year’s Design Award of Excellence winners and Citations of Merit winners. You can also find details on see last year's winners here. Design Award of Excellence: Bell Works Location: Holmdel, NJ Original Architect: Eero Saarinen, Kevin Roche, John Dinkeloo Restoration Team: Paola Zamudio (Bell Works Creative Director/NPZ Style + Décor), Alexander Gorlin Architects (Lead Architect) Client: Somerset Development The first mirrored glass-enclosed structure designed by modernist architect Eero Saarinen was once home to Bell Laboratories (later owned by AT&T, Lucent, and ultimately Alcatel-Lucent). Once Alcatel-Lucent left the site and murmurs of demolition became known, Somerset Development and Alexander Gorlin Architects transformed the site into a two-million-square-foot mixed-use “metroburb” now known as Bell Works. “This is an ambitious project that has reconfigured what was once the largest vacant commercial building in the country into a dynamic urban center,” said architectural historian Robert Nauman in a press release. It was awarded the Commercial Design Award of Excellence. Yale Center for British Art Location: New Haven, CT Original Architect: Louis I. Kahn Restoration Team: Knight Architecture LLC (Restoration Architect); Yale Center for British Art; Yale University Office of Facilities (Department of Planning and Project Management); Turner Construction Company (General Contractor); Peter Inskip & Peter Jenkins Architects Limited (Conservation Architect); Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc. (Structural Engineer and Building Conservation Consultant); BVH Integrated Services – Engineer (Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing and Fire Protection); Philip R. Sherman, P.E. (Code Consultant); Staples & Charles Limited (Furnishings, Fixtures and Equipment Consultant); Michael Morris, Metropolitan Museum of Art (Architectural Conservator); Strong Chen Graphic Designers (Graphic Design); LMB Facilities Solutions, LLC (Logistics Consultant); Stephen Saitas Designs (Exhibition Designer) Client: Yale University Office of Facilities, Yale Center for British Art The Louis Kahn–designed building was awarded the Civic/Institutional Design Award of Excellence for its restoration. The Yale Center for British Art opened in 1977 and, after escalating conservation pressures, its current director Amy Meyers established a conservation plan that set policies for future care of the building. The restoration project was phased over 10 months in 2015. The Bubeshko Apartments Location: Los Angeles, CA Original Architect: Rudolph M. Schindler Restoration Team: Eric Haas, AIA & Chava Danielson, AIA – DSH Architecture (Restoration Architect), Joe DeMarie (General Contractor) Client: Madeleine Brand & Joe DeMarie The restoration project for the Bubeshko Apartments, one of the few intact family dwellings designed by modernist Rudolph Schindler, led to a Residential Design Award of Excellence. Schindler’s vision was that of a “Greek hillside”—a framework for individuated apartments, each with a direct connection to the outdoors, that work collectively. “Instead of transforming the complex into luxury condominium pods, the owners and restoration team gave careful consideration to both the original intent of the architect and original owners, thus ensuring this unique addition to the cultural life of Los Angeles will be admired and enjoyed for years to come,” according to the jury. Heroic Project & Heroic: Concrete Architecture and the New Boston Location: Boston, MA Heroic Project: Chris Grimley, Michael Kubo, Mark Pasnik Publication Team: Alan Rapp, Madeleine Compagnon, Michael Vagnetti and Gianfranco Monacelli, Monacelli Press, Reem Kanoo, assistant editor James Jarzyniecki, axonometric drawings Ann Lui and Josh Niemiec, researchers Contributors: Joan Ockman, Elizabeth Cohen, Keith N. Morgan, Douglass Shand-Tucci (essays); Peter Chermayeff, Henry N. Cobb, Araldo Cossutta, N. Michael McKinnell, Tician Papachristou, Frederick A. “Tad” Stahl, Mary Otis Stevens (interviews) Additional support: Graham Foundation; Zan Foundation; over,under; pinkcomma gallery; Bruner/Cott Architects and Planners; Simpson Gumpertz & Heger; Esto Calhess; Students of Wentworth Institute of Technology; Dozens of photographers and archivists who provided access to resources; More than 200 contributors to the Heroic funding campaign Awarded the Advocacy Award of Excellence, the Heroic Project and its book is an eight-year research initiative into Boston’s concrete architecture from 1960 to 1976. It led to an advocacy effort to preserve the city’s Brutalist architecture, including exhibitions, design studios, research seminars, lectures, interviews, tours, and landmark preservation campaigns. “By celebrating the artistry and design of concrete architecture in Boston and beyond, the Heroic Project redefines Brutalist architecture locally, nationally and internationally,” according to the Docomomo US Board of Directors. Save the Reactor Campaign Location: Seattle, WA Organization: Historic Seattle; Washington Trust for Historic Preservation; Docomomo US/WEWA The campaign aims to honor the role and impact of nuclear science during the Cold War, and its efforts have been awarded the Advocacy Award of Excellence. While the brutalist Nuclear Reactor building on the University of Washington’s campus was demolished, the Washington State Supreme Court is expected to rule on the bearing of local preservation ordinances over state institutions of higher learning who claim an exemption. Citations of Merit winners: The Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer (Grand Island, NE), American Enterprise Group (Des Moines, IA), Boston University School of Law (Boston, MA), Vincent G. Kling Mid-Century House (Gladwyne, PA). For more on the Design Award of Excellence winner and Citations of Merit winners, visit Docomomo US's website here.
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Carme Pinós awarded Berkeley-Rupp Architecture Professorship and Prize

Carme Pinós, the award-winning Spanish architect and academic, has been named the recipient of this year’s Berkeley-Rupp Architecture Professorship and Prize. The award, bestowed by the University of California, Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design (CED), highlights the accomplishments of a “distinguished design practitioner or academic who has made a significant contribution to advancing gender equity in architecture, and whose work emphasizes a commitment to sustainability and community,” according to a press release by the CED. The prize includes a $100,000 award, a one-year professorship at the school, and a public lecture and gallery exhibition also to be held at the school. In announcing the prize, CED Dean Jennifer Wolch praised Pinós’s studied and broadly-based portfolio of work, stating, “Her outstanding design, vibrant intellectualism, dedication to public architecture and landscape in the public realm, and support of women-led economic development embody all that we strive to cultivate with this prize.” Pinós founded her namesake firm in 1991 after garnering high regard with the designs for the Crematorium at Igualada Cemetery in Barcelona, Spain with Enric Miralles. Recent works include the Caixa Forum Zaragosa in Zaragosa, Spain as well as the Cube I and Cube II office towers in Guadalajara, Mexico. Among many other projects, Pinós’s office is currently designing a master plan the French town of Saint Dizier. Pinós will begin her residence at CED during the spring semester of 2018 and will utilize a semester-long graduate research studio to conduct inquiries into one of her latest projects, which, through a partnership with Albert Faus and support from the Ministèrie de L’Habitat et de l’Urbanisme du Burkina Faso, will look into the development of a new, low-cost, sustainable thermal insulation made from peanuts. The project aims to utilize formal associations among the mostly-female peanut farmers of Burkina Faso to develop a production plant to produce the insulation. The project also aims to erect an agricultural training and investigation center to fuel the effort. In 2012, Deborah Berke, founder of the award-winning firm Deborah Berke Partners and current Yale School of Architecture dean, was awarded the inaugural Berkeley-Rupp Professorship and Prize. Sheila Kennedy, founder of Portable Light Project, a venture that aims to bring solar textiles to the developing world, received the prize in 2014.
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Exhibition on Architectural League of New York’s League Prize for Young Architects + Designers opens

The 2016 Architectural League of New York's League Prize for Young Architects + Designers focused on the theme of (im)permanence. As the League's website says, this year's competition "asks how time affects architecture’s assertion of style, methods of assembly, and relationship to program." The exhibition, open until July 30, showcases the drawings, models, and research of the winners at the Arnold and Sheila Aronson Galleries at Parsons School of Design at The New School. As The Architect's Newspaper reported in May, this year's diverse group included: Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy, DESIGN EARTH, Cambridge, MA and Ann Arbor, MI Juan Alfonso Garduño Jardón, G3 Arquitectos, Querétaro, Mexico Neyran Turan and Mete Sonmez, NEMESTUDIO, San Francisco, CA Neeraj Bhatia, The Open Workshop, San Francisco, CA Hubert Pelletier and Yves de Fontenay, Pelletier de Fontenay, Montreal, Canada Yasmin Vobis and Aaron Forrest, Ultramoderne, Providence, RI Three of the winners will also discuss their responses to the theme of (im)permanence in a June 30 lecture; the event can also be streamed live through the Architectural League of New York. The 2016 League Prize was organized by the Architectural League and its Young Architects + Designers Committee.
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ARM Architecture claim Australian Institute of Architects Gold Medal for 2016

This year, the Australian Institute of Architects has chosen to award "controversial" firm, ARM Architecture, the Gold Medal. The prize is the country's highest architecture accolade. In the competition's 56-year history, it is only the second time the Gold Medal has gone to a group of three.
Founded in 1998, the practice from Perth in South West Australia have a history of "dividing opinion" and producing bold, contemporary, and daring designs that often showcase elaborate forms with bright colors. In the jury comprising the Institute's National President, Jon Clements, former President David Karotkin, Alice Hampson, Annabel Lahz, and Professor Carey Lyon, no opinions were divided as they lauded the trio as "highly talented individuals." The firm’s directors Stephen Ashton, Howard Raggatt, and Ian McDougall received the award on Friday 29th April, with the Institute stating that they have "built a successful large-scale practice which has had a profound impact across the national design landscape." "This is a practice that has been a genuine leader, influencer, provocateur, culture builder and disseminator of ideas for nearly three decades, and at the core of the practice are three outstanding architects who have created some of the most extraordinary buildings in the short post-colonial history of this country," said Clements. The award acknowledges their notable works, including the Perth Arena in Western Australia, Storey Hall at RMIT University, the refurbishment of Hamer Hall, Melbourne Recital Hall and the reconfiguration of Melbourne’s Shrine of Remembrance, a project that took ten years. On receiving the honour Ian McDougall said "We’ve always been interested in architecture that tells stories about our lives, about our cities. It is humbling to have our ideas acknowledged in this way." Past winners of the Gold Medal include Glenn Murcutt, Jørn Utzon (known for the Sydney Opera House), Brit Andresen, Harry Seidler and Robin Boyd.
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Winners announced for 2016 Architectural League of New York Prize for Young Architects + Designers

Now in its 35th iteration, the The Architectural League of New York's Prize for Young Architects + Designers revealed its winners for 2016. Past winners have included SOFTlab (2012), Ma Yansong & Yosuke Hayano (2006), Claire Weisz & Mark Yoes (1993), and countless more. The theme of this year's prize was "(im)permanence"—in the words of the League,(im)permanence "asks how time affects architecture’s assertion of style, methods of assembly, and relationship to program, thus altering our expectations of permanent structures in an impermanent environment." The winners are: Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy, DESIGN EARTH, Cambridge, MA and Ann Arbor, MI Juan Alfonso Garduño Jardón, G3 Arquitectos, Querétaro, Mexico Neyran Turan and Mete Sonmez, NEMESTUDIO, San Francisco, CA Neeraj Bhatia, The Open Workshop, San Francisco, CA Hubert Pelletier and Yves de Fontenay, Pelletier de Fontenay, Montreal, Canada Yasmin Vobis and Aaron Forrest, Ultramoderne, Providence, RI
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Santiago Calatrava awarded European Prize for Architecture

Tuesday night at a ceremony on the 33rd floor of World Trade Center 7, high above his World Trade Center Transportation Hub, Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava was awarded the European Prize for Architecture by the Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design and the European Centre for Architecture. The accolade is awarded to architects each year who have made substantial contributions to the field. Last year's winner was Alessandro Mendini, who was given the award at a ceremony in Milan. In the crowd was a host of construction industry professionals, each with a table. Calatrava and his family had a table in the front, and Calatrava was giddy as the representatives of the Chicago Athenaeum and European Centre praised his long and prolific career. The highlight of the night was then he was presented with a crown made of olive leaves from the Parthenon in Athens. Calatrava gave a short lecture about his work, from his first projects in Zurich and Spain to his over 50 bridges around the world. He explained how he was trained as an engineer, but was eventually inspired by the human form and eyebrows, which evolved into his signature reptilian style.    
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David Adjaye exhibition, Ukrainian urban planners among winners of new Graham Foundation grants

Chicago's Graham Foundation today announced nearly half a million dollars in grant funding for “groundbreaking” architectural projects by organizations, including the first major career survey of architect David Adjaye, an urban planning program in Ukraine, and architecture festivals in Norway and Portugal. The Graham Foundation, whose director Sarah Herda sits on AN's editorial advisory board, will award $496,500 to 49 projects that “chart new territory in the field of architecture.” The award recipients were plucked from a pool of over 200 submissions representing 22 countries. The Adjaye show, titled Making Place: The Architecture of David Adjaye, opens September 19 at the Art Institute of Chicago and will be “the only North American venue for this globally focused exhibition,” according to the Art Institute. Other grant recipients include a plan to exhibit sound sculptures designed by Harry Bertoia at Chicago's Experimental Sound Studio, the Storefront for Art and Architecture’s biannual World Wide Storefront event, and the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale. The announcement follows the Graham's “grants to individuals” program, which in May awarded $490,000 for architectural research to 63 projects. Here's the full list of recipients, organized by category: EXHIBITIONS [23 awards] Art Institute of Chicago (Chicago, IL) Chicago Design Museum (Chicago, IL) Columbia College Chicago-Museum of Contemporary Photography (Chicago, IL) Elmhurst Art Museum (Chicago, IL) The Jewish Museum (New York, NY) MAK Center for Art and Architecture, Los Angeles, at the Schindler House (West Hollywood, CA) Materials & Applications (Los Angeles, CA) Monoambiente (Buenos Aires, Argentina) Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (Chicago, IL) Museum of Modern Art (New York, NY) National Trust for Historic Preservation (Washington, DC) Oslo Architecture Triennale (Oslo, Norway) Parasol Unit Foundation for Contemporary Art (London, England) Serpentine Gallery (London, England) Slought (Philadelphia, PA) Socrates Sculpture Park (Long Island City, NY) Southern California Institute of Architecture (Los Angeles, CA) Swiss Institute (New York, NY) University of California, Berkeley-Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (Berkeley, CA) University of Chicago-Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society (Chicago, IL) Video Game Art Gallery (Chicago, IL) Yale University-School of Architecture (New Haven, CT) FILM/VIDEO/NEW MEDIA [2 awards] Wavelength Pictures (London, England) The Wende Museum of the Cold War (Culver City, CA) PUBLIC PROGRAMS [12 awards] Archeworks (Chicago, IL) Architectural League of New York (New York, NY) Association of Architecture Organizations (Chicago, IL) CANactions (Kiev, Ukraine) Chicago Architecture Foundation (Chicago, IL) Chicago Humanities Festival (Chicago, IL) Experimental Sound Studio (Chicago, IL) The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture (Scottsdale, AZ) Lampo (Chicago, IL) Ohio State University-Knowlton School of Architecture (Columbus, OH) Storefront for Art and Architecture (New York, NY) Van Alen Institute (New York, NY) PUBLICATIONS [12 awards] Anyone Corporation (New York, NY) Art Papers (Atlanta, GA) California Institute of the Arts-REDCAT (Los Angeles, CA) Columbia University-Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (New York, NY) LIGA-Space for Architecture (Mexico City, Mexico) Lisbon Architecture Triennale (Lisbon, Portugal) MAS Context (Chicago, IL) Primary Information (Brooklyn, NY) The Renaissance Society (Chicago, IL) Rice University-School of Architecture (Houston, TX) Walker Art Center (Minneapolis, MN) Zone Books (Brooklyn, NY)
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AN West Editor Mimi Zeiger wins Landscape Architecture Magazine’s Williams Medal

Landscape Architecture Magazine has given its annual Williams Medal to AN West Editor Mimi Zeiger for her article "Fresno v. Eckbo." Featured in LAM's December 2014 issue, Zeiger's piece centers on a redevelopment proposal for the Garrett Eckbo–designed Fulton Mall in downtown Fresno, California. The city government plans to run streets through the pedestrian-friendly landscape in an effort to revitalize this now struggling, once well-known city center. Zeiger's article draws attention to how the plan would jeopardize the preservation of the historically designed area. Zeiger’s piece is one of two articles chosen by a LAM committee that met the criteria of a subject taken into larger context in a compelling manner that provokes positive change, as stated in the American Society of Landscape Architect’s website. Annually awarded to two articles, one that has run in LAM and the other outside of LAM, the Bradford WIllliams award has recognized 34 individuals since 1979, making Zeiger the 35th awardee, leaving the 36th spot to someone yet to be announced.
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World Architecture Festival Finalists Revealed

Ribbon Chapel for weddings, Seto Inland Sea, Japan, by Hiroshi Nakamura ... Architects and designers from 47 countries are competing to win prizes in the 2015 World Architecture Festival Awards following the announcement of the shortlist today. Nearly 400 designs in 31 categories have been chosen ranging from small family homes to huge commercial developments, landscape projects and interiors. Major world architects taking part include Foster Partners, Zaha Hadid Architects, Rafael Vinoly Architects and the designer of the controversial Garden Bridge in London, Heatherwick Studio. As usual there are also small practices unknown outside their own countries, who will be presenting their shortlisted work, along with big names, at the annual World Architecture Festival (WAF) in Singapore this November. This is the eight year of the WAF awards, which cover completed buildings, future projects, landscape designs, and interior architecture and design. WAF programme director Paul Finch commented: ‘ We are delighted that our entry numbers were up this year, and the quality of submissions is as high as ever. ‘What is fascinating about these awards is the opportunity they provide to compare how different architects and designers tackle the same sort of problems in completely different parts of the world.’ For more information www.worldarchitecturefestival.com