Posts tagged with "Awards":

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The Architect’s Newspaper recognizes excellence at the first Annual Design Gala

On March 11, The Architect’s Newspaper hosted its inaugural Annual Design Gala in New York, which recognized leaders in architecture, design, and construction in North America. The night consisted of a cocktail reception followed by an awards dinner; both held in the Stanford White-designed Bowery Savings Bank, a sumptuous Beaux-Arts space bedecked with a bevy of classical detailing and a 65-foot vaulted ceiling ballroom ringed by Corinthian columns and crowned with Tiffany glass. For AN, the Annual Design Gala fills a programmatic void within the design community. “The inspiration for this gala came when I realized that there was no premiere gala specifically celebrating all aspects of Architecture; from the architects, planners, designers to the engineers and contractors,” said publisher Diana Darling. “And, it’s our vision at The Architect’s Newspaper that this is the first of many.” The awardees of the gala were selected by a 22-person voting committee—many of whom were members of ANs jury for the 2019 Best of Design Awards—and were recognized in seven categories. Building of the Year was awarded to Beyer Blinder Belle and Planners, INC Architecture & Design, LUBRANO CIAVARRA, Mathew Nielsen Landscape Architects, MCR/MORSE Development, Stonehill Taylor, and Turner Construction for their work on the TWA Hotel; Denise Scott Brown received the Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of her decades of leadership in the architecture and design community; Studio Gang was honored in the Excellence in Building category for recent projects such as Solar Carve and Mira Tower; Urbanist of the Year went to Kate Orff of SCAPE and Columbia Urban Design; Leong Leong received the Interior Excellence award; builder Sciame Construction was awarded Contractor of the Year, and Buffalo-based terra-cotta manufacturer Boston Valley Terra Cotta was honored with Innovator of the Year. In honor of Denise Scott Brown’s Lifetime Achievement Award, AN commissioned designer Vilaplana + Vilaplana to produce Ode to Denise Scott Brown, a vinyl print inspired by the raucous postmodern architecture advocated for and designed by Venturi Scott Brown & Associates over the decades. Erica Hill Studio directed and produced audio and visuals for the Design Gala.
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Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara named 2020 Pritzker laureates

Irish architects and educators Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara, perhaps best known internationally as cocurators of the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale, have been named the 2020 recipients of the Pritzker Architecture Prize. This is the first time since 2010 that a duo has been awarded architecture’s most prestigious honor—Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of Tokyo-based SANAA were named as Pritzker co-recipients that year. A trio, the cofounders of Spain’s RCR Arquitectes, won in 2017. It’s also the first time that an Ireland-based architect—or, in this case, architects—has won the Pritzker Prize. Although the late Kevin Roche, who won the prize in 1982, was born in Dublin, he based his practice in Connecticut and was an American citizen at the time of his win. Farrell and McNamara are the fourth and fifth female architects to be named Pritzker laureates, joining Zaha Hadid, Kazuyo Sejima of SANAA, and Carme Pigem of RCR Arquitectes. “For their integrity in their approach to both their buildings,” reads a portion of the 2020 Jury Citation, “as well as the way they conduct their practice, their belief in collaboration, their generosity towards their colleagues, especially as evidenced in such events as the 2018 Venice Biennale, their unceasing commitment to excellence in architecture, their responsible attitude toward the environment, their ability to be cosmopolitan while embracing the uniqueness of each place in which they work, for all these reasons and more, Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara are awarded the 2020 Pritzker Architecture Prize.” “They have tried, with considerable success, to help us all overcome what is likely to evermore become a serious human problem,” added Jury Chair Justice Stephen Breyer. “Namely, how do we build housing and workplaces in a world with over half of its population dwelling in urban environments, and many of them who cannot afford luxury.” Both graduates of University College Dublin, Farrell and McNamara established the Dublin-based practice Grafton Architects—named after the street the firm’s original office was located on in order to emphasize a sense of place, not the people behind it—in 1978. Together the team have received numerous accolades and architecture awards prior to the Pritzker, including the Jane Drew Prize (2015), the inaugural RIBA International Prize (2016), and the RIBA Royal Gold Medal (2020) among others for their considerate and human-scaled work that’s bold yet perceptive, physically imposing yet intimate, and effortlessly interacts with the surrounding landscape, be it the lush Irish countryside or a dense city center. “Farrell and McNamara create spaces that are at once respectful and new, honoring history while demonstrating a mastery of the urban environment and craft of construction,” reads a press statement announcing the win. “Balancing strength and delicacy, and upholding a reverence of site-specific contexts, their academic, civic and cultural institutions, as well as housing developments, result in modern and impactful works that never repeat or imitate, but are decidedly of their own architectural voice.” In 2008, Farrell and McNamara’s School of Economics building at at the Universita Luigi Bocconi in Milan was named World Building of the Year at the World Architecture Festival in Barcelona. Acclaimed projects in Farrell and McNamara’s native Ireland include the Solstice Arts Centre in County Meath (2006), the Loreto Community School in County Donegal (2006), and the University of Limerick Medical School (2012). Also of note is Dublin’s North King Street Housing, an 82-unit residential complex completed in 2000 that brought a “calm modesty” to a dense historic warehouse district by eschewing loud external design features. Outside of Milan and Ireland, where Farrell and McNamara have also designed a number of private homes, Grafton Architects has also completed buildings in France, the United Kingdom, and Peru. Farrell and McNamara’s theme for the 2018 Venice Biennale was Freespace, a concept that explored “a generosity of spirit and a sense of humanity at the core of architecture’s agenda, focusing on the quality of space itself,” in the architects’ own words. “The exhibition invites emotional and intellectual engagement of the many who come to the Biennale in order to understand architecture more fully, to stimulate discussion on core architectural values and to celebrate architecture’s proven and enduring contribution to humanity.” In addition to being bestowed with numerous awards that now includes the coveted Pritzker Prize, Farrell and McNamara have lectured on architecture and the built environment at venues across the globe. They've also held teaching positions at a number of universities including Yale University, the Harvard Graduate School of Design, Accademia d’Archittettura in Mendrisio, Switzerland, and at their alma mater, the School of Architecture at University College Dublin, where they were named adjunct professors in 2015. Both are elected members, and the first architects to be admitted, of esteemed Irish arts organization Aosdána. “Within the ethos of a practice such as ours,” said McNamara in a statement, “we have so often struggled to find space for the implementation of such values as humanism, craft, generosity, and cultural connection with each place and context within which we work. It is therefore extremely gratifying that this recognition is bestowed upon us and our practice and upon the body of work we have managed to produce over a long number of years. It is also a wonderful recognition of the ambition and vision of the clients who commissioned us and enabled us to bring our buildings to fruition.”
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John Beardsley will curate inaugural Oberlander International Landscape Architecture Prize

Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF) has named writer and art historian John Beardsley as curator of the Cornelia Hahn Oberlander International Landscape Prize. The biennial award is the first-ever international landscape architecture prize to give recipients a $100,000 cash prize and two years of public engagement activities. Named after lauded German-born, British Columbia-based landscape architect Cornelia Hahn Oberlander, the inaugural prize will be awarded in 2021. Beardsley, who holds degrees from Harvard University and the University of Virginia, is the author of several books including Earthworks and Beyond: Contemporary Art in the Landscape (2006) and Gardens of Revelation: Environments by Visionary Artists (1995), the latter of which profiles Helen Martins, Simon Rodia, and many others. From 1974 to 1978, Beardsley acted as a curator at the Washington, D.C., Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and at the Corcoran Gallery, also in Washington, from 1981 to 1989. He has organized and co-organized numerous acclaimed exhibitions including The Quilts of Gee’s Bend, which showed at both the Whitney Museum of American Art and at the Museum of Fine Art Houston. In addition to his curatorial roles, Beardsley has held teaching positions in the landscape design departments of Harvard, the University of Virginia, and the University of Pennsylvania. Most recently, Beardsley served as director of Garden and Landscape Studies at the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection in Washington, D.C. In his new role as curator of the Oberlander Prize, Beardsley will craft the prize’s intellectual content, support the jury process, and have an integral role in developing public engagement programs. As TCLF notes, these programs “are key to reaching the goal of increasing the recognition, visibility, and legibility of landscape architecture as a global, cultural, and professional practice.” “I am thrilled that John Beardsley has agreed to be the Oberlander Prize Curator,” said Elizabeth K. Meyer, chair of the Oberlander Prize Advisory Committee, in a press statement. In addition to developing the inaugural curator role and selecting Beardsley to fill it, the committee will assist Beardsley in his various responsibilities. “The Oberlander Prize Advisory Committee quickly and unanimously agreed that he would be the perfect person to lead the Prize process in its early years,” added Meyer. “John’s knowledge of the cultures of landscape studies, landscape architectural history, and contemporary landscape architecture practice is both broad and deep. The landscape architecture community, and the cultures of landscape, are indebted to John for taking on this momentous new program.”
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Turner Prize split among all four finalists after plea to judges

At the award ceremony on Tuesday evening, Turner Prize history was made when all four finalists were announced winners. After a plea to the judges, Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Helen Cammock, Oscar Murillo, and Tai Shani split the $52,000 prize equally in a ceremony held offsite from the prize's typical home in London's Tate Modern In a joint letter written to the jury, quoted in full in a recent press release, the artists said, “At this time of political crisis in Britain and much of the world, when there is already so much that divides and isolates people and communities, we feel strongly motivated to use the occasion of the Prize to make a collective statement in the name of commonality, multiplicity, and solidarity—in art as in society.” It's worth noting that none of the artists had ever met each other before being shortlisted.  Due to the nature of the artists' work, which includes themes of migration, patriarchy, and civil rights, they urged the judges not to pit subjects against each other. The judges unanimously decided to honor their request and praised their commitment to the power of the collective: “We are honored to be supporting this bold statement of solidarity and collaboration in these divided times. Their symbolic act reflects the political and social poetics that we admire and value in their work.” One of the winners, Abu Hamdan, describes himself as an “audio investigator” and makes work that explores the “politics of listening” and the role of voice within human rights. His installations and performances reflect in-depth research and investigative work and he has worked with human rights organizations such as Amnesty International and Defense for Children International. He is also a member of Forensic Architecture, the art-and-architecture research collective that was shortlisted for the same prize in 2018.  The prize has never been won collectively in its 35-year history, and perhaps never will going forward. The decision is ultimately sparking conversation on the complicated nature and relevance of cultural awards in the first place. A recent The New York Times headline asks, “What’s the Point of the Turner Prize, Anyway?” and The Guardian wrote, “annually [the prize] seems to divide audiences as much as it brings them together.” But, just like Tate’s website states on the homepage, “The Turner Prize provokes debate about art.” Year after year, it continues to do so.

36th Annual Preservation Design Awards

The California Preservation Awards are a statewide hallmark, showcasing the best in historic preservation. The awards ceremony includes the presentation of the Preservation Design Awards and the President’s Awards, bringing together hundreds of people each year to share and celebrate excellence in preservation. Click here to read more and submit an award nomination.

About the Preservation Design Awards

Since 1983 over 500 projects have been recognized with a Preservation Design Award. Winning projects are selected by a jury of top professionals in the fields of architecture, engineering, planning, and history, as well as renowned architecture critics and journalists. The jury selects projects that have furthered, to a notable degree, the purposes of the profession, consistent with the California Preservation Foundation’s mission.

About the President’s Awards

President’s Awards honor people deserving of special recognition for their outstanding preservation efforts. Since its inception in 1991, this program has recognized more than 150 individuals and organizations whose work allows others to gain a deeper appreciation of historic resources and their value to California’s economy, environment and quality of life. All proceeds from this event support the California Preservation Foundation’s statewide education and advocacy programs.
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$100,000 landscape architecture prize named after Cornelia Hahn Oberlander

The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF) announced today that Canadian landscape architect Cornelia Hahn Oberlander has been chosen as the namesake of its new international prize. The Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit first introduced the biennial award, now dubbed the Oberlander Prize, back in August as the first and only one of its kind to provide a $100,000 award for landscape architects. Currently living in Vancouver, Oberlander, 98, has worked across Canada and the United States for over 70 years. Among her most notable works include the National Gallery of Canada, The New York Times Building in New York, the Canadian Chancery in Washington, D.C., and the Museum of Anthropology in Vancouver—one of the dozens of projects where she collaborated with the late architect Arthur Erickson. In a July meeting with TCLF president and CEO Charles A. Birnbaum, Oberlander said she was “overwhelmed and smitten” by the honor and released the following statement: 
“I hope the Oberlander Prize will spur landscape architects to innovate, be inventive and generate new ideas, and to be leaders in their community.  Landscape architecture is ideally suited to deal with the environmental, social and ecological challenges we face now and the challenges we must plan for in the future.  Landscape architects are a combination of artists, designers, choreographers, and scientists; they must also be leaders, especially in dealing with the effects of climate change.  Through careful research, innovation, collaboration with allied professionals, and design excellence, landscape architecture can become a global leader in addressing the important issues we all face.”
Oberlander is a highly-decorated, award-winning design professional whose influence most recently earned her the ranking of Companion of the Order of Canada, the highest level of the Order of Canada. Though she was born in Germany, Oberlander immigrated to the United States for a brief time to study at Smith College and the Harvard Graduate School of Design. In 1951, she became a community planner in Philadelphia, eventually working alongside Dan Kiley on both the Schuylkill Falls public housing project led by architect Oskar Stonorov and the Millcreek housing project led by Louis Kahn.  Two years later she established her own practice in Vancouver and quickly garnered attention for her environmentally-thoughtful design. At Expo ‘67 in Montreal, she created the Children’s Creative Center, an innovative playground that led her work on 70 playground projects in her lifetime. “It was the consensus of the Prize Advisory Committee,” said Birnbaum in a press release, “which helped shape the Prize, and TCLF’s Board of Directors that Cornelia Oberlander’s inspiring and trailblazing career in the field of landscape architecture exemplifies the critical values and ideals of the Prize, and that she is someone who embodies the Prize criteria of creativity, courage, and vision.” TCLF is in the process of raising $4.5 million to endow the prize forever and has received individual commitments of $10,000 each from donors within its 100 Women Campaign. The inaugural recipient will be announced in 2021.
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Walter Hood, Emmanuel Pratt, Mel Chin take home MacArthur Foundation Genius Grants

Yesterday, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation announced the 26 winners of its annual Fellowship program, commonly known as the “Genius” Grant. The “no-strings-attached” $625,000 grant is given to those who exhibit “exceptional originality, insight, and potential” in their creative disciplines. Unlike other fellowships, the recipients do not apply for the grant but are nominated and anonymously selected by a committee of experts from a range of fields.  This year’s fellows include a selection of artists, urban designers, scientists, and musicians, to name a few. Among those selected include landscape and public artist, Walter Hood; urban designer, Emmanuel Pratt; and interdisciplinary artist Mel Chin.  Walter Hood was awarded the grant for creating “ecologically sustainable urban spaces that resonate with and enrich the lives of current residents while honoring communal histories.” He received his MLA and M.Arch from the University of California, Berkeley, as well as an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is currently the creative director of Oakland-based Hood Design Studio, a social art and design practice he founded in 1992.  Recent projects that illustrate Hood’s interest in the role of sculpture in public space include his plans for Nauck Town Square in Arlington County, Virginia which includes a towering sculpture that spells “Freed” made of replica slave badges. He is also designing the landscaping surrounding the new International African American Museum, and Hood Design has been shortlisted to reimagine the La Brea Tar Pits. Emmanuel Pratt is an urban designer, and cofounder and executive director of the Sweet Water Foundation (SWF). He was offered the award for his integration of “agriculture, education, and design in a resident-driven approach to community development” and “turning neglected urban neighborhoods into places of growth and vitality.” Pratt received a Master of Science in Architecture and Urban Design from Columbia University after studying architecture at Cornell for his undergraduate degree.  SWF was featured in this year’s Chicago Architecture Biennial with the project Re-Rooting + Redux which was inspired by the construction method Chicago’s worker cottages. The installation transforms the structure into a gallery space reflecting on the future of the city’s South Side.  Selected for “harnessing the power of art to raise awareness of social concerns,” artist Mel Chin’s work is often said to defy categorization. Whether it is a public installation, animated films, or sculptural objects, Chin’s work utilizes materiality and place as a way to engage diverse groups of people. Chin is the oldest of the recipients, at 67, and resides in Egypt Township in North Carolina.  Speaking with The New York Times, Chin said, “I don’t want to use the word ‘responsibility’ but this felt like an acknowledgment that maybe after a life’s work, you just need to do more.”  The full list of 2019 fellows is as follows:
Elizabeth Anderson, philosopher; Sujatha Baliga, attorney; Lynda Barry, cartoonist; Mel Chin, artist; Danielle Citron, legal scholar; Lisa Daugaard, criminal justice reformer; Annie Dorsen, theater artist; Andrea Dutton, geochemist; Jeffrey Gibson, visual artist; Mary Halvorson, guitarist; Saidiya Hartman, cultural historian; Walter Hood, landscape and public artist; Stacy Jupiter, marine scientist; Zachary Lippman, plant biologist; Valeria Luiselli, writer; Kelly Lytle Hernández, historian; Sarah Michelson, choreographer; Jeffrey Alan Miller, literary scholar; Jerry X. Mitrovica, geophysicist; Emmanuel Pratt, urban designer; Cameron Rowland, artist; Vanessa Ruta, neuroscientist; Joshua Tenenbaum, cognitive scientist; Jenny Tung, anthropologist; Ocean Vuong, writer; Emily Wilson, classicist.
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Graham Foundation announces 2019 organizational grant recipients

The Chicago-based Graham Foundation has released a list of organizations that will receive its coveted Production and Presentation Grants to pursue architecture-related projects this year. A total of 54 organizations will be presented with financial support from the foundation, with no grantee’s allocation exceeding $30,000 and few receiving the full amount requested. In line with the Graham Foundation’s mission to “foster the development and exchange of diverse and challenging ideas about architecture,” awardees will receive assistance with production-related expenses for a variety of undertakings that aim to enrich architectural discourse, including films, publications, exhibitions, and lectures. Final decisions were made on the basis of four criteria: originality, feasibility, capacity, and potential for impact.

The winning projects for 2020 are split into four distinct categories—exhibitions; film, video, and new media projects; public programs; and publications—and were submitted by a wide range of institutions, companies, and non-profits. Among the grantees are Boston’s MASS Design Group, Michael Sorkin’s Terreform, the Oslo Architecture Triennale, and the University of Chicago’s South Side Home Movie Project. Several past grant recipients received funding for new projects this year, including the Museum of Modern Art for a publication on the work of Robert Venturi and Mexico City-based LIGA-Space for Architecture, which is working to highlight Latin American designers in its annual public program. Here is the full list of the 2020 recipients and their respective projects:

EXHIBITIONS (19 awards)

Àkéte Art Foundation Lagos, Nigeria How To Build a Lagoon with Just a Bottle of Wine?, 2nd Lagos Biennial

ArchiteXX Syracuse, NY Now What?! Advocacy, Activism, and Alliances in American Architecture since 1968

Art Institute of Chicago Chicago, IL In a Cloud, in a Wall, in a Chair: Six Modernists in Mexico at Midcentury

Chicago Architecture Biennial Chicago, IL Graham Foundation Artistic Director

Cranbrook Art Museum Bloomfield Hills, MI Ruth Adler Schnee: Modern Designs for Living

Elmhurst Art Museum Elmhurst, IL Assaf Evron & Claudia Weber

El Museo Francisco Oller y Diego Rivera Buffalo, NY Paul Rudolph’s Shoreline Apartments

Equitable Vitrines Los Angeles, CA Florian Hecker

Landmark Columbus Foundation Columbus, IN Good Design and the Community: 2019 Exhibition, Exhibit Columbus

LIGA–Space for Architecture Mexico City, Mexico LIGA Public Program 2019–2020

Madison Square Park Conservancy New York, NY Martin Puryear: Liberty/Libertà: US Pavilion, 58th International Art Exhibition

Materials & Applications Los Angeles, CA Staging Construction

National Building Museum Washington, DC Architecture is Never Neutral: The Work of MASS Design Group

National Trust for Historic Preservation—Farnsworth House Plano, IL Edith Farnsworth Reconsidered

Oslo Architecture Triennale Oslo, Norway Enough: The Architecture of Degrowth, Oslo Architecture Triennale 2019

Serpentine Galleries London, United Kingdom Serpentine Pavilion 2019 by Junya Ishigami

Storefront for Art and Architecture New York, NY Building Cycles

Toronto Biennial of Art Toronto, Canada Learning from Ice

University of Illinois at Chicago—College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts Chicago, IL A Certain Kind of Life

FILM/VIDEO/NEW MEDIA PROJECTS (4 awards)

Architectural Association School of Architecture London, United Kingdom Architecture in Translation

The Funambulist Paris, France The Funambulist Network

MASS Design Group Boston, MA The Whole Architect: Giancarlo De Carlo

University of Chicago—South Side Home Movie Project Chicago, IL South Side Home Movie Project Interactive Digital Archive

PUBLIC PROGRAMS (6 awards)

Association of Architecture Organizations Chicago, IL 2019 Design Matters Conference

Harvard University—Graduate School of Design—African American Student Union Cambridge, MA Black Futurism: Creating a More Equitable Future

Independent Curators International New York, NY Curatorial Forum

Lampo Chicago, IL Lampo 2019 Concert Series at the Graham Foundation

New Architecture Writers London, United Kingdom Constructive Criticism

University of Michigan—A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning Ann Arbor, MI Re: Housing: Detroit

PUBLICATIONS (25 awards)

Anyone Corporation New York, NY Log: Observations on Architecture and the Contemporary City, Issues 47, 48, and 49

ETH Zurich—gta exhibitions Zurich, Switzerland Inside Outside / Petra Blaisse

Flat Out Inc. Chicago, IL Flat Out, Issues 5 and 6

Harvard University—Graduate School of Design–New Geographies Cambridge, MA New Geographies 11: Extraterrestrial

Haus der Kulturen der Welt Berlin, Germany Counter Gravity: The Architecture Films of Heinz Emigholz

Instituto Bardi/Casa de Vidro São Paulo, Brazil Casa de Vidro: The Bardis’ Life between Art, Architecture and Landscape

The Museum of Modern Art New York, NY Robert Venturi’s Complexity and Contradiction at Fifty

Northwestern University Press Evanston, IL Southern Exposure: The Overlooked Architecture of Chicago’s South Side

Paprika! New Haven, CT Paprika! Volume V

Places Journal San Francisco, CA Reservoir: Nature, Culture, Infrastructure

PRAXIS, Inc. Boston, MA PRAXIS, Issue 15: Bad Architectures

Produzioni Nero Scrl Rome, Italy Scenes from the Life of Raimund Abraham

REAL foundation London, United Kingdom Kommunen in der Neuen Welt: 1740–1972

Rice University—School of Architecture Houston, TX PLAT 9.0

The School of Architecture at Taliesin Scottsdale, AZ WASH Magazine, Issues 003 and 004

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum New York, NY Countryside, The Future

Southern California Institute of Architecture Los Angeles, CA LA8020

Standpunkte Basel, Switzerland Archetypes: David Ross

The Studio Museum in Harlem New York, NY The Smokehouse Associates

Terreform New York, NY UR (Urban Research) 2019

University of California, Los Angeles—Department of Architecture and Urban Design Los Angeles, CA POOL, Issue No. 5

University of Florida—Graduate School of Architecture Gainesville, FL VORKURS_Dérive

University of Maryland, College Park—School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation College Park, MD See/Saw, No. 2: Difference

University of Miami—School of Architecture Coral Gables, FL Cuban Modernism: Mid-Century Architecture, 1940–1970

Yale University Press New Haven, CT Mies van der Rohe: The Architect in His Time

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The 2019 Aga Khan Award for Architecture winners split a $1 million prize

Every three years, the Aga Khan Award for Architecture is given to building concepts that “address the needs and aspirations of societies across the world in which Muslims have a significant presence.” The award was established in 1977 by the Muslim spiritual leader Aga Khan, with the belief that modern architecture often failed to meet the needs of non-Western societies.  Now in its 14th cycle, the six 2019 winners have been selected by a master jury of nine architects and scholars, including David Chipperfield, Elizabeth Diller, and Ali M. Malkawi, as well as David Adjaye, who served on the steering committee. The projects were selected from a shortlist of twenty buildings that represented sixteen countries and the finalists will share a $1 million prize with all of those involved in the realization of the project—architects, engineers, artisans, and builders.  As follows, here are the six winning projects from Bahrain, Bangladesh, the West Bank, the Russian Republic of Tatarstan, Senegal, and the United Arab Emirates The Revitalization of Muharraq  In 2013, The Authority for Culture & Antiquities Conservation Department of Bahrain began a series of restoration and adaptive reuse projects to highlight the World Heritage Site’s history in the pearl trade. The project has since evolved into a program titled Pearling Path, Testimony of an Island Economy which has created new public spaces that aim to “re-balance the city’s demographic makeup.” Arcadia Education Project  The Arcadia Education Project was designed by architect Saif Ul Haque Sthapati and was completed in 2016. Sthapati developed the modular, amphibious structure out of three types of bambooa solution that would avoid disrupting the existing ecosystem by allowing the building to rise with the water levels during monsoon season. The structure incorporates space for a preschool, a hostel, and a nursery.  Palestinian Museum Selected through an international competition, Dublin-based architects Heneghan Peng completed the 430,000 square foot Palestinian Museum in 2016. The zigzagging forms of the museum sit atop a terraced hill overlooking the Mediterranean and the building is clad with locally quarried Palestinian limestone. The LEED Gold-certified museum is intended to “foster a culture of dialogue and tolerance.” Public Spaces Development Program In an ongoing program for The Republic of Tatarstan, over 300 public spaces have been improved since 2015, including public gardens, beaches, walkways, and parks. The participatory design process encourages engagement with local citizens in an effort to offer equal quality spaces for all members of the community while reflecting on each place’s unique culture and history.  Alioune Diop University Teaching and Research Unit Te Alioune Diop University in Senegal has been functioning far beyond capacity since 2012. Spanish architects IDOM were asked to design a new addition with a 500-seat lecture hall, thirteen classrooms, and three labs, as well as offices and meeting rooms. Using local labor and materials, the building features a 660-foot-long lattice wall which provides passive cooling desirable for the tropical climate.  Wasit Wetland Centre The Dubai-based X-Architects transformed a “wasteland into a wetland” as a part of an initiative by Sharjah’s Environment and Protected Areas Agency. The Wasit Wetland Centre has helped restore the area’s natural ecosystem while providing visitors with information on biodiversity and preservation efforts.

New life for fibres

New contest on Desall.com: dbt FIBRE and Desall invite you to suggest new applications for the semi-finished textile products, exploring fields other than yarn making or similar. You are invited to suggest new contexts of use and applications for the semi-finished textile products by dbt FIBRE, suggesting markets where the company has not yet entered, exploring industries other than textile, yarn-making or similar, taking into consideration the technical characteristics of the fibres and their processability. For more info: https://bit.ly/dbtFIBRE Contest timeline Upload phase: 21st May 2019 – 12th September 2019 (1.59 PM UTC) Client Vote: from 12th September 2019 Winner announcement: approximately by the end of November 2019 Total awards €4000 Participation is free of charge and open to all creative people (at least 18 years old). dbt FIBRE For over 80 years world leader in the utilisation of textile fibres, dbt FIBRE combines the most advanced textile technology with specially modified machinery to offer a wide range of carded sliver and combed tops for classic and fancy yarns. Carded slivers for neppy yarns, flamed slivers for Tweeds, natural fibre tops made from modified fibres such as flat section viscose are the core of our knowhow. DESALL Desall.com is an open innovation platform dedicated to design and innovation, that offers to companies a participatory design tool involving in the creative process an international community coming from all over the world. To date Desall gathers more than 100000 creatives from over 210 countries and has collaborated with international brands like Luxottica, Whirlpool, Electrolux, ALESSI, Enel, Leroy Merlin, KINDER, Barilla, illy, Chicco, Mondadori and many more. Thanks for the contamination of different cultural backgrounds and creative industries, the Desall community is able to provide high-quality project solutions for every product development phase requested by the client, from concept to product design, from naming to packaging.

Swiss Original Handmade Creative Project

For centuries, the Swiss tradition of Emmentaler AOP cheese production has focused on the art of cheesemaking, on artisan skills and on HAND MADE expertise, all underpinned by a caring attitude towards nature, time, materials, know-how and the vital energy of the environment we live in.

In order to be able to continue to read, refresh and interpret its own values in an innovative, contemporary and disruptive way, from the outset Emmentaler Switzerland has always been very keen and interested in engaging, supporting and promoting the world of art, talent and creativity for all.

As was the case in past competitions, exhibitions and communication initiatives, Emmentaler Switzerland is launching a new open creative competition for the collection, valorisation and exhibition of a broad selection of works and thematic artworks.

THE SWISS ORIGINAL

As part of the new globalisation of recent decades, we have learned to appreciate not only certain values and products shared by many civilisations, but also values and products expressly linked to the geographical, historical and cultural origins of specific local areas.

This competition aims to collect, valorise and exhibit artworks that tell stories of Swiss originality. Originality intended in terms of both methods and content that are more specifically and quintessentially “Swiss”, as well as those that are more ironic, interpretative and disruptive.

For all information: https://bit.ly/SwissOriginal

CONTEST TIMELINE

Upload phase: 29th April 2019 – 5th September 2019

Community Vote: 5th September 2019 – 19th September 2019 (1.59 PM UTC)

Jury Vote: from 5th September 2019

Winner announcement: during the Exhibition-Event, in November 2019

AWARDS

The total award pool amounts to €36,000.00, split into 6 awards and 6 special mentions.

Entering the competition is free and open to everyone over the age of 18 on the date of registration, without any limit of nationality, profession, education, expertise or other form of restriction, except for being 18 at the time of participating in the contest.

Contest under the patronage of Brera - Accademia di Belle Arti and with the support of Cumulus Association

EXHIBITION - EVENT

In the first half of November 2019, a major Exhibition-Event will be organised in Milan featuring the winning projects, the projects that receive mentions and a broad selection of those deemed to be of high quality and pertinent in consideration of the general objectives of the competition.

PANEL OF JUDGES

Andrea Amichetti, Zero - Founder

Stefano Aronica, Consortium Emmentaler AOP

Giovanna Frova, Switzerland Cheese Marketing Italy

Maria Cristina Galli, Accademia di Brera - Vice Director

Michael Krohn, ZhdK Zürich Hochschule der Künste - Cumulus Association

Stefano Maffei, PoliFactory - Director

Massimo Bruto Randone, SosDesign - Founder

Antonio Riccardi, SEM - Editor and Poet

Toni Thorimbert, Studio Thorimbert - Photographer

DESALL

Desall.com is an open innovation platform dedicated to design and innovation, that offers to companies a participatory design tool involving in the creative process an international community coming from all over the world. To date Desall gathers more than 100000 creatives from over 210 countries and has collaborated with international brands like Luxottica, Whirlpool, Electrolux, ALESSI, Enel, Leroy Merlin, KINDER, Barilla, illy, Chicco, Mondadori and many more.

Thanks for the contamination of different cultural backgrounds and creative industries, the Desall community is able to provide high-quality project solutions for every product development phase requested by the client, from concept to product design, from naming to packaging.

2019 Miami Hospitality Design Awards Call For Entries

The American Institute of Architects Miami Chapter, the Greater Miami & The Beaches Hotel Association and Oberhausen Marketing & Public Relations announce the call for entries for the 2019 Miami Hospitality Design Awards. Project owners and licensed architects and designers from anywhere in the world with hospitality projects located in Miami-Dade County are invited to enter through Jan. 25, 2019.  Hospitality projects include hotels, restaurants, nightclubs, lounges and bars, and for the first time this year, food halls are welcome to submit. A licensed architect must be a part of the team to qualify for entry. “In just the last two years Miami has welcomed world-class hospitality venues that have been widely recognized,” said President, Oberhausen Marketing & Public Relations, Josh Oberhausen. “We are excited to host our second awards ceremony and honor the visionary minds elevating our city’s hospitality sector.” “Miami’s built environment has undergone tremendous change, especially in the hospitality sector where we are enjoying world-class venues and experiences,” said Executive Vice President, AIA Miami, Cheryl Jacobs. “Our first awards ceremony was well-received, and we look forward to another successful event,” said President and CEO, GMBHA, Wendy Kallergis. “We want MHDA to be a platform for industry leaders to come together and discuss Miami’s hospitality future, and also be recognized for their work.” Submission deadlines are as follows:
  • Registration and Payment Due: Jan. 25, 2019
  • Submission Uploads Due: Feb. 22, 2019
Entry fees:
  • AIA Miami & GMBHA members: $125 per entry
  • Non-Members: $200 per entry
The Miami Design Awards ceremony will take place on April 3, 2019, at The Miami EDITION Hotel. To enter, and for more information on the award categories and criteria, please visit: www.miamidesignawards.com.