Posts tagged with "ARUP":

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Behind the scenes at Canstruction LA

AN recently took a sneak peak at late night preparations for the fifth annual Canstruction LA, a charitable design competition—whose pieces are currently on display in the lobby of 5900 Wilshire Boulevard— that taps teams of architects, designers, builders and engineers to create large-scale sculptures using canned goods (and even a few water bottles) that will eventually be donated to the Los Angeles Regional Foodbank. What we found was a furor of activity, many boxes of pizza, and a bit of competitive banter among teams. “It’s like Christmas morning,” said Damian Carroll, one of the founders of Canstruction LA. The eight teams worked way past their normal office hours putting together their closely guarded designs. “You’ll see them, going to peek  at the other ones and thinking, ‘What are they building? What is that thing?'” said Carroll.  And how do these firms get all these cans? “You get to know the store managers really well,” said Cassandra Coffin of HKS Architects, the team that brought a yellow-skinned Despicable Me minion to life this year. This year’s awards went to: JURORS’ FAVORITE: “Can-on Picture a World Without Hunger” by Gensler and Arup
Defending champions Gensler and Arup used more than 4,000 cans for their larger- -than-life DSLR camera. They also stepped up their game by incorporating a live feed and a viewfinder that displays messages about hunger. STRUCTURAL INGENUITY: “CANcave/CANvex” by HMC Architects and Buro Happold Engineers The Richard Serra sculptures housed at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art across the street inspired these architects and engineers as they gave life to this undulating, complex shape. BEST MEAL: “Not So Hungry Hungry Hippo” by RTKL Associates This entry that plays off a popular children’s game comprise of a pasta course, a fish entrée, vegetable sides and even fruit for dessert. BEST USE OF LABELS: “CANucopia” by Perkins & Will Choosing cans with labels in natural tones, Perkins & Will recalled the bounty of nature. Find out what the other teams have in store and vote for the last remaining award: Cheri Melillo People's Favorite Award. 5900 Wilshire Boulevard is across the street from LACMA at the lobby of the Variety building until November 6. Admission is free, but bringing a can for donation is highly encouraged.
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Yes We CAN

Last night CANSTRUCTION LA, organized by the Society for Design Administration, announced the winners of its 2009 competition at 5900 Wilshire Boulevard. All 60,000 cans—from anchovies to pumpkin pie filling— used to build the amazing structures will go directly to the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank, as will over $7,700 in donations.  The structures will be on display at 5900 Wilshire through this Sunday. Check out this fantastic teaser video for the competition, which shows a clever can making its way from the supermarket to the venue. And here's a video of winning team Gensler putting together their entry. All 10 participating teams produced stellar constructions, but a few stood out. They were: JURORS FAVORITE: Gensler and Arup for "Pump-can" Pictured top, a full Thanksgiving meal in the shape of a giant, glowing, gravity-defying pumpkin. STRUCTURAL INGENUITY: Morris Architects and Walter P. Moore for "Where the Wild Cans Are" Notice the sharp teeth and claws..yikes. BEST USE OF LABELS: Perkins and Will for "Global Hunger Munny" Using label colors to demarcate world hunger trouble spots. Genius BEST MEAL: HKS for "Filling the Void" Tuna, sardines, anchovies, beans and green chiles. A light, sophisticated, protein-packed meal. HONORABLE MENTION: CO Architects for "Melt Away Hunger" How to make cans look like melting, cascading drips? Ask these architects..
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Ritchie Engineering

On Friday, Matthew Ritchie opened his new solo show, Line Shot, at the Andrea Rosen Gallery in Chelsea. While the work is impressive as always, most notable is the installation of the newest piece of "The Morning Line," a work unveiled at the Biennale last year (we saw it first hand!) that has begun to trek around the world in different forms, popping up earlier this summer in London, which is where the above video was shot. Inspired by the Big Bang, The Morning Line is notable not only for Ritchie's typically uncanny sense of and attention to detail but also its intricacy and precision, aided in part through a partnership with ARUP's Advanced Geometry Unit, led by Daniel Bosia, and the architects Aranda/Lasch, whose Ben Aranda walks us through the project in the video below. The piece is on view through December 2, as well as after the jump.