Posts tagged with "ArtCenter College of Design":

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ArtCenter to take over old Main Museum space in Downtown Los Angeles

ArtCenter College of Design is making a play for the old Main Museum space in Downtown Los Angeles. The Los Angeles Times reported that the Pasadena, California-based college has signed on to take over the 6,250-square-foot facility that had been occupied by The Main Museum until late last year when the institution abruptly and mysteriously shuttered.
ArtCenter president Lorne Buchman told The Times that the new space will give the school a foothold in L.A.’s bustling downtown, which has seen a flurry of arts-related activity over the past 20 years as major cultural venues and institutions have sprung up and expanded to the area. The move, according to Buchman, will also change ArtCenter’s reputation for being located in “the hinterlands” of Pasadena, a wealthy suburban enclave located 10 miles east of Downtown L.A.
Buchman said, “I’m excited about our students being able to be in that location and engage that community—that will make a huge difference.” The announcement came roughly six months after Main Museum director Allison Agsten penned a brief letter on the museum’s website announcing that ArtCenter and The Main Museum’s founder, real estate developer Tom Gilmore, were discussing “future plans [for] the space.” The announcement scuttled expansion designs for The Main Museum by Tom Wiscombe Architecture that would have added a new roof terrace to the Hellman Building, a historic mercantile office building opened in 1903.
Under the new agreement, ArtCenter will lease the space for $1 per year for the next 10 years and will have the option to renew the lease in the future.
The ArtCenter outpost will join the Diller Scofidio + Renfro–designed Broad Museum and the forthcoming wHY-designed Institute of Contemporary Art Los Angeles as recent newcomers to the Downtown L.A. art scene. The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles recently announced that it would be relocating its architecture galleries from the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood to the Frank Gehry–designed Geffen Contemporary outpost in nearby Little Tokyo, as well.
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The Peter and Merle Mullin Gallery is an instrument for art

The Peter and Merle Mullin Gallery at ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena, California, is a car-centric experience, inside and out. Not only has the 6,800-square-foot indoor-outdoor exhibition space been designed by Darin Johnstone Architects to function as a “state-of-the-art automotive and fine art gallery,” it is also perhaps best experienced from the seat of a car. The gallery fronts the street with a 12-foot-tall supergraphic undulating fin wall made up of 67 steel blades that can only be read from a distance. Depending on the viewer’s direction of travel, the fins spell out either Mullin or Gallery, an optical effect that allows passing automobiles to become “an instrument for viewing art,” according to the architect. Cars take prominence inside the gallery, as well, which has been designed to showcase the patrons’ eclectic antique automobile collection. To facilitate the flow of vintage cars in and out of the space, it features car-width sliding glass doors. The long, linear interior is framed by semicircular walls and curbs whose geometries correspond to the turning radii of modern cars. After an inaugural coupe-heavy show, the space will live on as an art venue for student work and traveling exhibitions.

1111 South Arroyo Parkway Pasadena, California 9110 626-396-2200 Darin Johnstone Architects

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Michael Maltzan's masterplan for Pasadena’s ArtCenter approved

A new 15-year master plan designed by Michael Maltzan Architecture (MMA) for Pasadena ArtCenter College of Design was unanimously approved by the Pasadena City Council on July 16.  The plan calls for the large-scale transformation for the school by expanding southward ArtCenter’s Craig Ellwood-designed Hilltop Campus. Among other aspects, the new plan calls for up to 1,500 new student beds, a series of new elevated terraces and quads, and a handful of new residential and academic buildings across the school’s new South Campus. The existing Hilltop campus will receive cosmetic and functional upgrades, including a new solar array, Urbanize.la reports  Tina Chee Landscape Studio is slated to work as the landscape architect on the project while ARUP and Sherwood Design Engineers will handle energy and water infrastructure optimization, respectively. MMA’s multi-phase plan will first connect a pair of existing South Campus buildings and two new housing towers with a new sloped terrace that spans over a stretch of train tracks cutting through the site. Phase one of the expansion will add 350- and 500- unit student housing towers as well as a new landscaped quad, and is expected to be completed by 2020. The project’s second phase will kick off that year and will involve a great deal more effort and construction.  The addition will add a second, much more expansive elevated terrace southward from the northern cluster of buildings impacted by phase one. The elevated terrace is depicted in project renderings containing interconnected pedestrian areas with large planters, public art, and assembly spaces filling out the spaces between the new buildings. A new multi-level student center will be located below the elevated terrace.  With the new multi-level complex, the architects hope to bring a form of “layered urbanism” to the site that will embed a variety of social, commercial, and cultural uses across the campus. Pedestrian improvements—including a bicycle path running the length of the site—will accompany the campus expansion.  Phase two is expected to be complete by 2027.
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Michael Maltzan Architecture to expand ArtCenter College of Design

ArtCenter College of Design has unveiled renderings of a new, two-phase master plan created by Michael Maltzan Architecture (MMA) that aims to reposition the college as an expansive, urban campus connected by pedestrianized open spaces, new housing, and student amenities. The new 15-year master plan for the university’s dual Pasadena campuses would boost enrollment by 500 students, bringing the total number of enrolled full-time students to 2,500. Plans include adding several new student housing towers, a mixed-use academic complex, two new quad spaces, pedestrian and bicycle paths and a cap over an existing light rail line right-of-way that transverses the site. The first phase of the project will bring two new eight-story housing towers to the north end of the campus containing 350 and 500 beds, respectively. The housing towers would be accompanied by a new quad that would span above the light rail line. The quad would be joined by ground floor amenity spaces in the housing towers that could include a new art supply store, student galleries, a campus cafeteria, and a coffee shop. Several existing buildings would receive internal upgrades and reprogramming during this phase as well. The first phase of the project is slated to be completed by 2020. Phase two of the project would bring the addition of a 220,000-square-foot housing and student center complex that would be capped by four eight-story towers containing up to 650 student beds. Plans call for potentially utilizing these structures as academic spaces as well. This complex would be located at the southern end of the campus and would replace an existing parking lot. This end of the campus would also receive a new elevated quad area that would be raised above street level to connect the new housing towers. Preliminary renderings of the complex depict planted terraces accessed by broad staircases and sloping landscape areas. These spaces would be overlooked by the new housing towers, which are depicted without detail in the renderings. A second satellite campus will receive internal upgrades, new solar arrays, as well as the removal of an annex building, Urbanize.la reports. Tina Chee Landscape Studio is slated to work as the landscape architect on the project. Plans call for the competition of both phases of the master plan by 2033.
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Art Center Dialing Down in Pasadena

Pasadena's Art Center College of Design has always been ambitious about building. But after some pushback, it's toning things down. Most architecture buffs know about the school's iconic black steel hillside campus designed by Craig Ellwood, and its equally ambitious downtown campus designed by Daly Genik, located inside a former Douglas Aircraft wind tunnel. But after its last director, Richard Koshalek, got pushed out largely for his super ambitious $150 million expansion plan, including a $45 million Frank Gehry-designed research center (many thought the school was putting more emphasis on facilities than teaching and students), the school's new expansion plans, confirmed this week, involve renovations and smaller expansions, not big gestures, reports the Pasadena Star News. The college is negotiating to buy a U.S. Post Office-owned building on a 2.4-acre lot at 870 S. Raymond Ave, right next to its downtown campus, and plans to use it as a base for fabrication and design. The plan also includes the expansion of the Ellwood Building, whose winner should be announced in the next couple of months. The overall expansion will cost a much more palatable $45 million, for which the school is now raising funds. And the school has no intention of moving into the city-owned Glenarm Power Plant, on which it holds a 10-year option.