Posts tagged with "Architectural League of New York":

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Winners announced for 2016 Architectural League of New York Prize for Young Architects + Designers

Now in its 35th iteration, the The Architectural League of New York's Prize for Young Architects + Designers revealed its winners for 2016. Past winners have included SOFTlab (2012), Ma Yansong & Yosuke Hayano (2006), Claire Weisz & Mark Yoes (1993), and countless more. The theme of this year's prize was "(im)permanence"—in the words of the League,(im)permanence "asks how time affects architecture’s assertion of style, methods of assembly, and relationship to program, thus altering our expectations of permanent structures in an impermanent environment." The winners are: Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy, DESIGN EARTH, Cambridge, MA and Ann Arbor, MI Juan Alfonso Garduño Jardón, G3 Arquitectos, Querétaro, Mexico Neyran Turan and Mete Sonmez, NEMESTUDIO, San Francisco, CA Neeraj Bhatia, The Open Workshop, San Francisco, CA Hubert Pelletier and Yves de Fontenay, Pelletier de Fontenay, Montreal, Canada Yasmin Vobis and Aaron Forrest, Ultramoderne, Providence, RI
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Hou de Sousa wins the 2016 Socrates Sculpture Park Folly Competition

The Manhattan-based architecture firm, Hou de Sousa, is on a winning streak this spring. This past March, the firm won Re-Ball!, a competition to repurpose over 650,000 plastic balls from a previous design exhibit into an installation for an abandoned underground trolley station in Washington D.C. (Their playful and interactive wonderland, titled Raise/RAZE, is set to open April 30.) And now the firm has won this year’s Folly competition in New York, hosted by the Architectural League of New York and the Socrates Sculpture Park. The theme this year was “function,” a break from the themes of years past, that drew from the literal meaning of folly: a blend of architecture and sculpture that doesn’t really serve a useful purpose. (These structures were once popular in 18th century England and French patrician gardens.) While the Folly competition is based in New York, it is open to global emerging architects. Hou de Sousa’s proposal, Sticks, addresses the function theme through an adaptable concept. Using interconnected lumber held together with webbing, the design supports an array of repurposed on-site scrap materials that provide shade and 18 inch deep shelves for possible future art exhibits. Their project takes advantage of an adjacent shipping container to help support the structure. It will serve as "a hub for Socrates Sculpture Park’s Education Studio, which hosts over 10,000 students annually," says the Socrates Sculpture Park in a press release. Hou de Sousa will build their project on site this May and June for a July 9 opening in the Socrates Sculpture Park in Long Island City, Queens. IK Studio won the competition last year, with the plywood pavilion Torqueing Spheres. Hou de Sousa’s Folly entry last year, Mochi, garnered a Notable Entry for their colorful domed quilt of ravioli-like inflated plastic bags. The Folly competition is privately and publicly supported, with public funds coming in part  from the New York State Council on the Arts.
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The Architectural League of New York to award President’s Medal to former mayor Bloomberg

The architecture, design, art and urbanism nonprofit the Architectural League of New York has announced the winner of its annual President's Medal. The League will award the 2016 prize to former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, who currently serves as the UN Secretary-General’s special envoy for cities and climate change. “We honor Michael Bloomberg for his long-term vision for New York and the world’s cities, and his continuing work to address local, national, and global issues,” said Billie Tsien, president of the League in a statement. One major and well-known art and design project Bloomberg helped approve was the temporary site-specific work, Christo and Jeanne-Claude's The Gates, in Central Park. The award comes after Bloomberg considered running for president as an Independent, but decided it wasn’t feasible. “In a three-way race, it’s unlikely any candidate would win a majority of electoral votes, and then the power to choose the president would be taken out of the hands of the American people and thrown to Congress,” he wrote in the Bloomberg View early this month. (He still hasn’t announced who he will endorse.) Past recipients include Renzo Piano, Ada Louise Huxtable, Richard Serra, Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown. The League is also known for its Emerging Voices competition that honors leading young firms and designers based in the U.S., Mexico, and Canada working in creative fields related to the built environment. They will present the President's Medal at a fundraiser dinner this April. On a side note: if you are a student or recent graduate in architecture, architectural history, or urban studies, do check out the Deborah J. Norden Fund travel grant opportunity (up to $5,000) that closes April 22.
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The Architectural League New York announces 2016 Emerging Voices winners

The Architectural League of New York announced the eight winners of its annual Emerging Voices program. “The 2016 ‘Voices,’ each responding to distinct geographic sites and typologies, all compellingly address the relationship between architecture and place by resourcefully synthesizing programmatic invention with computational production and the craft of building,” Anne Rieselbach, program director, said in a statement. This year, the jury panel was composed of Sunil Bald, Henry N. Cobb, Susannah Drake, Mario Gooden, Karrie Jacobs, Anna Kats, Thomas Phifer, and Billie Tsien. Lectures with the winners will be held throughout March and April at The Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen Center for Thought and Culture, 18 Bleecker Street, New York, NY at 7:00 p.m. Please verify all program information with The Architectural League before listing. The 2016 winners are... Alex Anmahian and Nick Winton, principals and cofounders of Anmahian Winton Architects A Cambridge, Massachusetts, architecture firm with works as far away as Turkey and close to home in Boston that views “the synthesis of place, program, and community as an opportunity to enhance the rituals of everyday life, foster a sense of wellbeing, and to inspire the imagination.” Omar Gandhi, principal at Omar Gandhi Architect Based in Halifax and Toronto, Gandhi’s projects are site-specific and material forward, keeping to a “modest, formal lineage that makes for architecture that is accessible to all types of people.” Cesar Guerrero, Ana Cecilia Garza, Carlos Flores, and Maria Sevilla of S-AR The Monterrey, Mexico–based firm focuses on “the design and development of architectural projects of several scales and typologies from private, experimental, and social structures to architectural installations, educational buildings as well as furniture and book design.” Frank Jacobus and Marc Manack, principals at SILO AR+D Splitting their time between Cleveland and Fayetteville, Arkansas, Jacobus and Manack have worked on a spectrum of projects from a church in Cleveland, a “Super Sukkah” pavilion in St. Louis, and a home in Fayetteville. Jon Lott, principal at PARA Project and cofounding member of Collective-LOK New York’s Jon Lott has most recently crafted a series of sleek, monolithic structures in Syracuse, New York, including the Haffenden House residence, the Crawford Attic Writing Room, and La Casita. E.B. Min and Jeffrey L. Day, principals, Min | Day Founded on the belief that “architecture is a spatial and material practice in the service of human habitation,” the studio is located in San Francisco and Omaha, with projects ranging from a home to a public transportation station. Rozana Montiel founder, Rozana Montiel | Estudio de Arquitectura Montiel’s work focuses on the public domain with projects that include the City Out of Line Park in Mexico City, Common-Unity, a public space rehabilitation project in Mexico City, and Court, a sports field in Veracruz, Mexico. Heather Roberge principal, Murmur Roberge’s most recent projects include an installation at SCI-Arc Gallery and two residences in Los Angeles, where the architect is based.
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HUD Secretary Julian Castro to headline IDEAS CITY 2015 in New York City

Julian Castro, the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, has been announced as the keynote speaker for the third annual IDEAS CITY festival in New York.  IDEAS CITY is a biennial street fair that “explores the future of cities with culture as a driving force.” It will launch its third annual rendition on May 28th–30th on the Bowery. Castro will address this year’s theme of “The Invisible City,” highlighting the parts of the city that go unseen, or the forces that are driving change that are not always easy to map. Castro was appointed Secretary of HUD in July, after gaining notoriety as not only an up-and-coming Democratic mayor of San Antonio, who has been mentioned as a possible Vice Presidential candidate in the 2016 race, but also as a strong advocate and innovator in urban policy with a design slant. From the IDEAS CITY website:

As three-term mayor of San Antonio, Julián Castro was known for innovative governance. His “Decade of Downtown” program campaigned for new investments in San Antonio’s city center and older communities and brought in $350 million of private sector money, generating more than 2,400 housing units. In 2010, Castro was enrolled in the World Economic Forum’s list of Young Global Leaders and named by Time magazine as one of its “40 under 40” list of notable leaders in American politics. At the 2012 Democratic National Convention, he became the first Latino to deliver a keynote. Castro took office as the sixteenth Secretary of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development on July 28, 2014.

This year’s festival promises to be an energetic follow-up to the previous years under the direction of Joseph Grima, who has been involved in no less than three Biennials in the last year, including Chicago’s Architecture Biennial and Biennale Interieur in Belgium. IDEAS CITY is also a partnership of The New Museum (Founder), The Architectural League of New York, Bowery Poetry Club, The Cooper Union, Storefront for Art & Architecture, The Drawing Center. Some of the other events that stand out are: —IDEAS CITY Street ProgramInstitute for Public Architecture: Total ResetKurt Andersen, Carmen Yulín Cruz, and others: MAYORAL CONVERSATION: Finding The Invisible CityRhizome: AIRBNB Pavilion: Stay With MeKim Stanley Robinson, Bjarke Ingels: Make No Little Plans: A CONVERSATION IN TWO PARTS:Part 1. Toward A Plausible UtopiaMunicipal Art Society, Architizer: Pitching the CityManny Cantor Center, Laura Nova: Moving Stories
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American Academy of Arts and Letters announces 2015 architecture awards

A star-studded jury has selected the winners of the American Academy of Arts and Letters' 2015 architecture prizes. Elizabeth Diller (chairman), Henry N. Cobb, Peter Eisenman, Kenneth Frampton, Michael Graves, Richard Meier, Laurie Olin, Cesar Pelli, Billie Tsien, and Tod Williams chose the awardees from among 41 nominations. Sheila O'Donnell and John Tuomey of Dublin's O'Donnell + Tuomey took home the $20,000 Arnold W. Brunner Memorial Prize, for which any architect "who has made a significant contribution to architecture as an art" is eligible. O'Donnell and Tuomey, who also received the 2015 Royal Gold Medal from the Royal Institute of British Architects, are the creative team behind projects including the Sean O'Casey Community Centre (Dublin, 2008) and Belfast's Lyric Theatre (2011). The jury also awarded four Arts and Letters Awards in Architecture of $10,000 each. Yolanda Daniels and Sunil Bald, and Kate Orff won the first two awards, reserved for American practitioners "whose work is characterized by a strong personal direction." Of Daniels and Bald's work, which they undertake in New York as Studio SUMO, juror Billie Tsien observed, "There is always a sense of the weight of materials in what they do." Kate Orff founded New York landscape architecture firm SCAPE to combine research and practice on the urban landscape. Her recent projects include Oyster-Tecture for the 2010 MoMA exhibition Rising Currents, and Living Breakwaters for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, ongoing since 2014. Kurt W. Forster and Rosalie Genevro secured the second category, for an American "who explores ideas in architecture through any medium of expression." Forster, an architectural historian and founding director of the Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities, is currently an emeritus visiting professor at Yale. Genevro heads the Architectural League of New York. "Quiet wisdom as well as consistent and powerful leadership are hallmarks of Rosalie's 30 years as executive director," said juror Tod Williams. Select work by the winners, who will receive their awards at the Academy's annual Ceremonial and may, will be on display in the Academy's galleries on Audubon Terrace from May 21-June 14.
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This glowing, beating heart designed in Brooklyn will be in Time Square for Valentine’s Day

A big, red fluttering heart will be aglow in Times Square this coming Valentine’s Day. Brooklyn-based, Venezuelan-born firm, Stereotank, has been named the winner of the 2015 Times Square Valentine Heart Design for its HEARTBEAT sculpture. The firm was invited, among others, to conceive a proposal for a Valentine's Day–inspired installation, located among the many glimmering lights of the Great White Way. The Times Square Alliance, in partnership with the Architectural League of New York, selected the winning proposal, which will open on February 9th. Stereotank’s HEARTBEAT is an interactive installation in the shape of a large heart, designed to glow along with the rhythm of a resonating heartbeat sound, set to a low frequency. Percussion instruments flank both sides of sculpture. The pace of the sound of this life-size beating heart will change in response to the movement and engagement of visitors as they near the sculpture and tap on its drums—each of which produces distinct sounds from different sized membranes and materials, including synthetic snare skin, synthetic snare skin will coil, animal hide, and hard plastic. “What's common between Love and Music? Love is about sharing and being ‘in tune’ with somebody, so it is the creation of music, a concert is a combined action where the performers are also ‘in tune’ creating harmony. Heartbeat orchestrates Times Square's unique, active, flickering atmosphere,” said Stereotank architects Sara Valente and Marcelo Ertorteguy in a statement. This year’s finalists included Alibi Studio; The Bittertang Farm & James Lowder; Chat Travieso; Modu Architecture; SLO Architecture; and Taylor Miller. Past winners of the competition, now in its seventh year, have included Young Projects (2014); Situ Studio (2013); BIG (Bjarke Ingels Group) (2012); Freecell (2011); Moorhead & Moorhead (2010); and Gage / Clemenceau Architects (2009). “The combination of an interactive heart beat that increases with approach and the music making capacities is very interesting," stated Barry Bergdoll, part of the Selection Committee and the Meyer Shapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University. "It is an impressive object to occupy this space of cacophony, with sufficient red mass to be enjoyed even by wheeled passersby.”
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If these five architecture teams get their way, the library of the future will look a lot different than today

New York City’s public libraries need cash—and they need it fast. Over the years, the city's three library systems—the New York Public Library (serving Manhattan, the Bronx, and Staten Island), the Brooklyn Public Library, and the Queens Public Library—have racked up over one billion dollars in capital needs. And that's not money needed for new educational tech tools, like iPads and laptops, but for renovations just to keep the old buildings in a state of good repair. Making things more challenging is that over the last decade, as the city's libraries continued to fall into disrepair, circulation through the city's three systems increased by 46 percent and program attendance shot up 62 percent. That's all according to the Center for an Urban Future, which published a report on the dire state of New York City’s public libraries back in September. But the Center didn’t just drop the bad news and see itself out the back door. It partnered with the Architectural League and launched a design study to find architectural, financial, and programmatic tools to get the libraries out of the red. Now, five interdisciplinary teams have proposed a wide range of ideas that would supposedly do just that. To the team led by Andrew Berman Architect, the city's libraries must become more useful and accessible tools for the people they serve. So, for example, just keeping community rooms open later in the day could go a long way. The team also proposes creating 24-hour vestibules at libraries that function like the ATM room at your bank. The keycard-accessible space would have plugs for laptops, book drop-off, and information kiosks. Essentially, just a place to hang out and work. A proposal called L+ from the team led by SITU Studio has two main goals: to make library community rooms "register as an accessible and useful neighborhood asset" and to create an entirely new service model for the 21st century library. To Team Situ, this means creating library "retail" outposts that become an extension of the existing library system. These flexible and architecturally distinct structures would have strong graphic identities, and be built within existing library buildings, storefronts, and transit hubs. The proposal from Marble Fairbanks with James Lima Planning + Development, Leah Meisterlin, and Special Project Office is rooted in the weeds of city data. After overlaying existing branch locations with flood zones, development potential, and information about communities (population growth, diversity, age range, etc), the team proposed a mixed-use tower for Brighton Beach that has stacks, ground-floor retail, and a mix of affordable and market-rate apartments. To understand the pitfalls and potential of the city's library system, the MASS Design Group investigated all aspects of a few specific branches in south Brooklyn. The team concluded that the libraries' programmatic possibilities were limited by the physical form of the buildings—so what did they do? They changed the buildings. In Sheepshead Bay, for example, MASS creates a branch with flexible space for cultural events. And in Coney Island, they turn the second floor of a library into a food, health, and educational center. Team UNION takes a less architectural approach, focusing instead on how to make public library more recognizable as civic institutions. To boost the the systems' profile, UNION proposes a new identity system that has a more recognizable library icon and clearer signage. This strategy also includes a marketing campaign and a new library card that could “unlock services far beyond libraries.” The team would also use "architectural strategies that leverage needed investments in roof and facade repairs to create more distinctive, open and flexible facilities."
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“SuralArk” Selected as Best Folly for Summer Installation at Socrates Sculpture Park

Socrates Sculpture Park and the Architectural League have selected Jason Austin and Aleksandr Mergold as the winners of their Folly 2014 competition. Commenced in earlier this year and launched in 2012, the contest's name and theme derive from the 18th and 19th century Romantic practice of architectural follies, or structures with little discernible function that are typically sited within a garden or landscape. Austin and Mergold's SuralArk was deemed the most deserving contemporary interpretation of the tradition, and will be erected within the park's Long Island City confines by early May. SONY DSC The winning submission takes equal parts inspiration from an upturned ship hull and a suburban home to arrive at its final form. Measuring 50 feet long and 16 feet tall, the design and its context are meant to speak to the increasingly ambiguous distinctions between city, suburban environments, and rural living. In a nod to its greater surroundings, the structure will be coated in the same vinyl sidings frequently found coating the walls of Queens residences. Such paneling will allow light to filter through the building's exterior, an effect that becomes more dramatic with night fall. The resonance of the ark form grows when one considers the East River's uninvited entry to and eventual submergence of the Park during 2012's Hurricane Sandy. SONY DSC A jury of Chris Doyle, ArtistJohn Hatfield, Socrates Sculpture ParkEnrique Norten, TEN Arquitectos; Lisa Switkin, James Corner Field Operations; and Ada Tolla, LOT-EK judged 171 entries from 17 countries before choosing the Austin and Mergold design. The pair currently work at a Philadelphia-based architecture and landscape firm that bears their name. They will be granted unfettered access to the Sculpture Park's studios and facilities throughout April in order to oversee the execution of SuralArk which should be open to the public on May 11th and remain on the grounds through August 3rd.
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Architectural League Names 2014 Emerging Voices

Today, the Architectural League of New York revealed its selections for the 2014 class of Emerging Voices, a distinction that honors young firms "with distinct design voices and the potential to influence the disciplines of architecture, landscape design, and urbanism." This year's pool of winners demonstrated an entrepreneurial spirit, according to the League, "pursuing alternate forms of practice, often writing their own programs or serving as their own clients." Winners are selected by a jury from a pool of invited firms. This year's international group of eight includes The Living (which just this week was also named winner of MoMA PS 1's Young Architects Program), Surfacedesign, SITU Studio, Ants of the Prairie, Estudio Macías Peredo, Rael San Fratello, TALLER |MauricioRocha+GabrielaCarrillo|, and Williamson Chong Architects. A lecture series is planned in March where each firm will present their work and design philosophy. Betsy Williamson, Shane Williamson, and Donald Chong Williamson Chong Architects Toronto According to the League:
“Context, materials research, economies of construction, building performance, and client-based collaboration” all shape the design approach of Williamson Chong Architects. Their work ranges in scale from furniture to master planning, including the House in Frogs Hollow and the Abby Gardens Food Community master plan.
David Benjamin The Living New York According to the League:
New Yorkʼs The Living explores – through installations such as Mussel Choir, exhibited at the Venice Biennale, and the NYCEDC project EcoPark – “how new technologies come to life in the built environment.” The Living was just named as the winner of the MoMA/PS1 Young Architects Program.
Geoff di Girolamo, James Lord, and Roderick Wyllie Surfacedesign San Francisco According to the League:
The landscape architecture and urban design practice Surface Design, Inc. focuses on creating landscapes that emphasize “personal histories and connections between culture and natural environment” with projects ranging in scale from domestic projects, to San Franciscoʼs Golden Gate Bridge Plaza, to Stonesfields Quarry Park in Auckland, New Zealand.
Basar Girit, Aleksey Lukyanov-Cherny, Wes Rozen, and Bradley Samuels SITU Studio Brooklyn According to the League:
The firmʼs Brooklyn-based studio, divided between design and fabrication spaces, enables their goal to “leverage fabrication efficiencies, material re-use, flexible assemblies, and community involvement to create spaces that engage in living relationships with the urban context.” Projects have included the ReOrder installation in the Brooklyn Museum Great Hall; Heartwalk, installed in Times Square; and mapping and analysis projects.
Joyce Hwang Ants of the Prairie Buffalo, NY According to the League:
Ants of the Prairie is an arts and research practice “dedicated to developing creative approaches in confronting the pleasures and horrors of our contemporary ecologies,” as seen in work such as Bat Cave and Bat Cloud and the currently under construction bird and bat Habitat Wall.
Salvador Macías Corona and Magui Peredo Arenas Estudio Macías Peredo Guadalajara, Mexico According to the League:
Estudio Macías Peredo, acknowledging “the understanding of our regional situation (geographically and socio-culturally), where [a] craftsman is part of the building process,” embraces ideas of critical regionalism, as explored in the residences Casa Atlas and Casa Arenas.
Ronald Rael and Virginia San Fratello Rael San Fratello Oakland, CA According to the League:
Rael San Fratello shies away from working within a set philosophy, trying rather “not to define, but rather to constantly redefine ourselves” with projects, ranging from the art installation Prada Marfa to their winning entry in the Sukkah City competition, “Sukkah of the Signs, aka the Homeless House,” that “try to do the most with the least.”
Mauricio Rocha Iturbide and Gabriela Carrillo Valadez TALLER |MauricioRocha+GabrielaCarrillo| Mexico City According to the League:
TALLER IMauricioRocha+GabrielaCarrilloI focuses on “the importance of the vernacular, craftsmanship, sustainability, and socially-responsible design” in projects such as Plastic Arts School, Universidad Autónoma Benito Juárez de Oaxaca and the Hall for the Visually Impaired, Ciudadela.
The League's Emerging Voices lecture series will take place at the Scholastic Auditorium located at 557 Broadway, New York. For exact dates and ticket information, visit the League's website. The 2014 jury included Fred Bernstein, Paul Lewis, Kate Orff, Thomas Phifer, Annabelle Selldorf, and Adam Yarinsky. Previous Emerging Voices winners include Jeanne Gang, Morphosis, Steven Holl, Tod Williams, Deborah Berke, Brad Cloepfil, Michael Maltzan, and many others.
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Pictorial-ism> Photos from the Architecture League’s 2013 Beaux Arts Ball

On Saturday night, New York's architecture community gathered in Manhattan's historic 69th Regiment Armory  to celebrate the Architectural League of New York on the centennial of the original 1913 Armory Show. The sold out party welcomed 1,350 design-minded revelers dressed as their favorite "–ism," the theme of this year's event, representing everything from surrealism, revivalism, Dadaism, classicism, and brutalism. In all, over $100,000 was raised for the League. SITU Studio designed an installation to bring scale to the cavernous armory space, working with Renfro Design Group on an integrated lighting scheme. A series of white fabric prisms were suspended from the ceiling, serving to humanize the space while providing an armature for digital projections. Pulsing music built excitement throughout the night, which culminated in a procession of giant vellum marionettes, each controlled by a team of three performance artists, and a troupe of vellum-clad artists wandering through the armory, encouraging attendees to dance. Photos by Fran Parente.
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What’s Your -Ism? Tickets on Sale for Arch League’s 2013 Beaux Arts Ball

In 1913, the 69th Regiment Armory in Manhattan hosted what was then considered the most shocking art exhibition the public had ever seen. The International Exhibition of Modern Art, which came to be called The Armory Show, introduced modern European art to an East Coast audience. A showcase of -ism art movements then in development and exploration by artists now considered masters of their craft, the event was transgressive; it induced backlash from several publications and from former President Theodore Roosevelt who commented that “the lunatic fringe was fully in evidence.” Yet, even in his blatant dislike of the artworks displayed, President Roosevelt admitted the importance of the show’s existence, its revelation of the European “art forces that cannot be ignored.” This Saturday, September 28, in a centennial homage of the show that shocked the American world, the Architectural League of New York is hosting their annual Beaux Arts Ball in the same venue. Taking inspiration from a space originally meant for National Guard trainings and military activities, the ball will work with and within the great hall to transform its appearance, shockingly. (And tickets are on sale now!) Designed in 1903 by the architecture competition-winning firm Hunt & Hunt, the 69th Regiment Armory reflects the Beaux Arts style, featuring a sweeping hall with exposed interior structure and a symmetrical brick façade covering its exterior. According to Situ Studio, the environment created for Arch League’s 2013 Beaux Arts Ball will feature “an array of tensegrity structures that will rise above and dip below and existing cable grid datum 20 feet overhead.” This array includes an artistic matrix of sculptural, yet lightweight, fabric shapes that will float above partygoers. Accompanied by responsive lighting by Renfro Design Group, a performance of huge Processional Arts Workshop puppets, and sound installation by Nathan Halpern, the event will recreate the 28,000 square feet civic space as a completely different environment, a modern version of the inflammatory Armory Show that transpired there a century ago. Celebrate your favorite -ism at the party of the year. The Architectural League of New York’s 2013 Beaux Arts Ball September 28, 2013 9:00PM - 1:00AM 69th Regiment Armory at Lexington Avenue New York City For tickets, go to: archleague.org/2013/09/beaux-arts-ball-2013 Beaux Arts Ball 2013 - Design Preview from Situ Studio on Vimeo.