Posts tagged with "Architectural League of New York":

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Six emerging firms win 2019 Architectural League Prize for Young Architects & Designers

Young New Yorkers, Jennifer Bonner of MALL, and f-architecture, are among the people and firms to receive the 2019 Architectural League Prize for Young Architects + Designers. Now in its 38th year, the prestigious program created by the Architecture League of New York selected six emerging talents under the theme of Just, which explores architectural action within the discipline. The annual portfolio competition is open to designers who are 10 or fewer years out of an undergraduate or master’s degree program and live and work in North America. To submit for the 2019 prize, entrants were challenged to “consider the just in how they approach the practice of architecture,” by detailing their experimental research, design advocacy, or unique techniques and methodologies of practice. According to the Architectural League, “JUST explores architectural action with the understanding that a multiplicity of coexisting and contradictory attitudes may be constructive, liberating, and justified.” This year’s firms, selected from a jury that included past winners of the prize, will have the opportunity to lecture in New York in late June and showcase their work in an exhibition at the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center at Parsons School of Design/The New School. Check out the recipients below: Cyrus Peñarroyo of EXTENTS Ann Arbor, MI Peñarroyo and his partner McLain Clutter founded the Ann Arbor–based practice EXTENTS just two years ago and the duo are gaining widespread recognition for their unique use of contemporary digital tools in exhibition design, installations, and research projects. According to the Architectural League, the firm is “interested in architecture, urbanism, media, digital culture, and other instruments of life that can be impacted by design.” Peñarroyo currently serves as an assistant professor of architecture at Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, where he was the William Muschenheim Fellow in 2015-16. Last month, EXTENTS opened the installation, “Lossy/Lossless” (pictured at top) at Materials & Applications (M&A) in Los Angeles. Virginia Black, Gabrielle Printz, Rosana Elkhatib of f-architecture Brooklyn, NY Virginia Black, Gabrielle Printz, and Rosana Elkhatib founded the Brooklyn-based feminist architecture collaborative in 2016. Self-described as “a three-woman architectural research enterprise aimed at disentangling the contemporary spatial politics and technological appearances of bodies, intimately and globally, ” the trio works on temporary installations, exhibitions, and research-based projects. They simultaneously tackle writing, activism, and performance pieces meant to reach a broader audience. Gregory Melitonov of Taller KEN New York, Guatemala City, San José, CR International practice Taller KEN was founded in 2013 by Gregory Melitonov and Inés Guzmán. Based initially in New York and Guatemala City, the duo recently expanded their work to San José, Costa Rica. Their colorful and playful projects, ranging from commercial spaces to public installations and residential habitats, are created with “social and cultural relevance,” according to the architects. Taller KEN’s robust portfolio includes a mid-rise apartment complex with a verdant facade, a 4,500-square-foot café and event space, as well as a prismatic canopy built with recycled elastic ribbons. In 2016, the firm was named one of AIANY’s New Practices New York. Mira Hasson Henry of Henry Architecture Los Angeles, CA Founded in 2016, Henry Architecture is the personal practice of SCI-Arc design professor Mira Hasson Henry. In her work, she draws on common building elements such as windows, cladding, and eaves to explore social and architectural topics such as inclusion and identity, according to the Architectural League. Additionally, she utilizes different mediums such as models, wallpaper, photographer, and installations to examine various modes of architectural representation. Henry also serves as SCI-Arc’s DID Coordinator. Jennifer Bonner of MALL Atlanta, GA A native of Alabama, Bonner began MALL in 2009 when she was working as a professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Though she currently lives in Boston and serves as the director of the Master in Architecture II Program at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, she’s interested in experimenting and building architecture in the American South. Inspired by her students and the flexibility that comes as an academic practitioner, Bonner uses MALL as a way to explore and invent new ways to represent architecture. Her most recent project, Haus Gables, is a cross-laminated timber structure that hacks the traditional multi-family residential typology and is designed around the gabled roof plan. Rachel G. Barnard of Young New Yorkers New York, NY Rachel G. Barnard founded Young New Yorkers (YNY) in 2012, a restorative justice project that provides arts-based diversion programs to teens prosecuted as adults by the New York State criminal justice system, as well as young adults up to age 25. By empowering participants to explore their creative side utilizing photography, video, illustration or design, the young defendants also learn skills related to accountability, leadership, responsibility, and choice, among others. Barnard has established partnerships with agencies across New York City and since its inception, Young New Yorkers had successfully graduated over 1000 participants who, by completing the program, are rid of their criminal record, jail time, or other adult criminal justice sanctions. The League Prize 2019 exhibition will be on view for free from June 21 through July 31.
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Socrates Sculpture Park announces the winner of annual Folly/Function competition

New York's Socrates Sculpture Park and The Architectural League of New York have announced the winner of their annual Folly/Function competition. This year's winning proposal comes from Brooklyn-based firm School Studio, which has designed a small steel kiosk. Judging from the released rendering, the pavilion will be more functional than those of past years; apparently, it will operate as a sort of information kiosk with branded Socrates Sculpture Park goods. The design imagines a small steel-framed box with enough room inside for a couple of people to sit. The exterior walls are able to slide out from the surface of the kiosk, cantilevering off the structure as signs or banners of sorts. When the walls are retracted and tightly wrapped around the structure, the "mirrored doors of the kiosk" make it so the pavilion "melts into the scenery," according to a press release from the competition organizers. Last year's winner was Ithaca-based firm HANNAH with its suite of 3D-printed concrete furniture. The pavilion will be open for visitors at the Socrates Sculpture Park starting June 17.
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Davies Toews uses a DIY mind-set to punch above its weight

Every year the Architectural League of New York recognizes eight dynamic young firms as Emerging Voices that have the potential to become leaders in the field. Historic winners like Morphosis (1983) and Toshiko Mori (1992) have become today's lions, and practices like Johnston Marklee (2007) and Tatiana Bilbao (2010) have jumped to new heights after recent wins. This year's crop was selected in a two-stage portfolio competition where a jury of architects selected the winners. The deciding jury included several previous winners like Dominic Leong (2017), Fernanda Canales (2018), and Marlon Blackwell (1998), giving the process a familial feel. Laureates for 2019 come from across North America and almost all are partnerships or collaboratives—capital letters feature prominently, too.  Davies Toews will lecture at the Scholastic Auditorium at 130 Mercer Street, New York, New York, at 7:00 p.m. on March 7, as part of the Emerging Voices lecture series. The storefront office of Davies Toews Architecture is tucked behind a corner of 13th Street in Manhattan’s East Village, and like so many of the firm’s projects is defined by constraints. Common elements like outdoor tile and plywood create a homey atmosphere, and models and materials are tightly arranged throughout the space, inviting passersby to peer in on the studio’s creative process. Partners Trattie Davies and Jonathan Toews are no strangers to working around tight spatial and financial limitations. Whether it’s a linear park that rises between a descending set of switchback staircases in Hudson, New York; a perspective-defying, split-level park and art gallery in Memphis, Tennessee; or a three-story townhouse in Brooklyn, their projects are united by the common thread of extreme site-specificity. “Our strategy has been: Do first, analyze second,” said Davies. “It’s really important for us to build work, to learn about how things get done—what works and what doesn’t work, so we could get good at it. Most of what we do is built. We do very few competitions.” Fittingly, materiality plays a large role in these completed projects. For the 72,000-square-foot University of Chicago Charter School: Woodlawn Campus, a school for grades 6 through 12 with a 100 percent college acceptance rate, the studio had to balance a modest budget with lofty design ambitions. Using only locally produced Chicago brick, the studio designed a variegated, kinetic facade by patterning the building with darker, extruded brick. The school’s flared parapets and step-gap massing reference missing buildings in the surrounding neighborhood, breaks in a uniform street wall. “We realized that, project after project, the design came from the constraint,” said Toews. “Lately we’ve been thinking a lot about how to design with Sheetrock.” Even Sheetrock, a ubiquitous and uniform material, can provide inspiration; Davies compared the alternating bands of color in stacked, wrapped Sheetrock to a tapestry. “Every project gets modeled,” said Toews. “There’s the idea of the model sitting there; you can’t avoid it. We just try to keep making stuff around the project until it gets better and better.”
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FreelandBuck draws on representation for spatial effects

Every year the Architectural League of New York recognizes eight dynamic young firms as Emerging Voices that have the potential to become leaders in the field. Historic winners like Morphosis (1983) and Toshiko Mori (1992) have become today’s lions, and practices like Johnston Marklee (2007) and Tatiana Bilbao (2010) have jumped to new heights after recent wins. This year’s crop was selected in a two-stage portfolio competition where a jury of architects selected the winners. The deciding jury included several previous winners like Dominic Leong (2017), Fernanda Canales (2018), and Marlon Blackwell (1998), giving the process a familial feel. Laureates for 2019 come from across North America and almost all are partnerships or collaboratives—capital letters feature prominently, too.  FreelandBuck will lecture at the Scholastic Auditorium at 130 Mercer Street, New York, New York, at 7:00 p.m. on March 14, as part of the Emerging Voices lecture series. FreelandBuck builds drawings. Not in the traditional sense of constructing what’s represented by a drawing set, but in the sense that its architecture directly evokes carefully constructed perspectives and painstakingly hand-drawn renderings. “We think about drawing at the scale of architectural space,” says partner Brennan Buck, “as an end product, not a means to build.” Buck, based in New York City, and David Freeland, who is based in Los Angeles, met in grad school at UCLA and started working together in 2009. Of their bicoastal practice, Freeland says, “There are more opportunities than challenges. It exposes us to different groups of potential clients, but also to different environments. I think the practice is richer for that.” Working at a variety of scales also makes the practice richer, giving the firm the chance to explore its ideas in different ways. Parallax Gap, a colorful canopy of layered screens installed in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C., feels like a drawing come to life. The intricate trompe-l’oeil representations of historic American ceilings are like perspective drawings—each constructed with a unique vanishing point—that reveal themselves as visitors walk through the space. FreelandBuck borrowed rendering techniques to enliven the riff on office cubicles the firm designed for a film production company in L.A. To accommodate the company’s variable spatial needs and match its lighthearted style, the architects defined flexible work areas with a series of “tumbling” cubes whose milled surfaces, evoking a poché or hatch, suggest another set of cubes overlaid onto the first. Furniture that looks torn from a Roy Lichtenstein canvas adds to the effect of stepping into a drawing. Although there are nods to linework in the exterior finishes used on two of the firm's residential projects, Stack House and Second House, these connections to representation are more complex. In both buildings, distinctive exterior volumes articulate dedicated programs, and in both buildings, this distinction is broken down by unexpected interior elements. Stack House’s curved walls blend its spaces together, while Second House achieves a sense of continuity through materials, transparency, and interior courtyards. The perspectival shifts of Parallax Gap appear here in more subtle ways, concealing and revealing spaces, views, and experiences; it’s not about adding lines, it’s about erasing them. FreelandBuck may draw on the techniques of representation but, unlike a conventional drawing, its work can’t be understood through a single image. Like the best architecture, the spaces, places, and objects the firm creates are challenging and engaging and must be experienced to be fully appreciated.
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Colloqate instrumentalizes design as a tool for social justice

Every year the Architectural League of New York recognizes eight dynamic young firms as Emerging Voices that have the potential to become leaders in the field. Historic winners like Morphosis (1983) and Toshiko Mori (1992) have become today’s lions, and practices like Johnston Marklee (2007) and Tatiana Bilbao (2010) have jumped to new heights after recent wins. This year’s crop was selected in a two-stage portfolio competition where a jury of architects selected the winners. The deciding jury included several previous winners like Dominic Leong (2017), Fernanda Canales (2018), and Marlon Blackwell (1998), giving the process a familial feel. Laureates for 2019 come from across North America and almost all are partnerships or collaboratives—capital letters feature prominently, too.  Colloqate will lecture at the Scholastic Auditorium at 130 Mercer Street, New York, New York, at 7:00 p.m. on March 28, as part of the Emerging Voices lecture series. Colloqate Design, a multidisciplinary, New Orleans–based “nonprofit design justice practice” founded in 2017 by Bryan Lee Jr.—Sue Mobley came on in 2018—with the goal of “building power through the design of public, civic, and cultural spaces,” is setting a different path relative to other design offices. For one, Colloqate spends quite a bit of time doing the arduous work of educating and training communities, institutions, and municipal agencies through initiatives like its Design as Protest and Design Justice Summit events to “build practices around design justice,” according to Lee. Buildings are not an afterthought for the practice, but Lee and Mobley’s view of how designers and design justice intersect is firmly rooted in grappling with everything that exists beyond and around their particular projects. According to the duo, this “syntax of built environment”—including but not limited to the social mores we keep, the design of streetscapes and infrastructure, and the impact of political policies—has as direct an impact on how people use spaces as any one design element might. So a key goal of their practice involves making others aware of how these overlapping and sometimes competing languages operate so that when they do building-oriented design work in a given space, they can “intentionally organize, advocate, and design spaces of racial, social, and cultural equity.” The practice started off as an outgrowth of the Claiborne Corridor Cultural Innovation District, a visionary urban plan that would transform a 19-block area below an elevated highway in New Orleans into a “culture-based economic driver” for the Claiborne Corridor neighborhood. The plan, envisioned for an area that was once a social and economic core of New Orleans’s black community but was cleared to make room for the highway, aims to articulate a socially guided vision for bringing a public market, classrooms, exhibition spaces, and health, environmental, and social services to the area. Another project, Paper Monuments, brought a flurry of posters to sites across the city to “create new narratives and symbols of [New Orleans]…and to honor the erased histories of the people, events, movements, and places that have made up the past three hundred years” of history. The citizen-led project sought to use public art as a way to further Colloqate’s core aim of “dismantling the privilege and power structures that use the design professions to maintain systems of injustice.” Lee explained that as a nonprofit entity (Colloqate’s growing board includes urban planners, architects, and other design professionals), Colloqate must necessarily take an unorthodox and provocative approach. As the practice expands, completes projects, and envisions its future, however, Lee hopes to apply Colloqate’s ethos more directly to bricks and mortar. “We want to be the most radical design firm out there,” Lee said, “and we need to build buildings to do that.”
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SCHAUM/SHIEH experiments with architectural tools to produce surprising spaces at every scale

Every year the Architectural League of New York recognizes eight dynamic young firms as Emerging Voices that have the potential to become leaders in the field. Historic winners like Morphosis (1983) and Toshiko Mori (1992) have become today's lions, and practices like Johnston Marklee (2007) and Tatiana Bilbao (2010) have jumped to new heights after recent wins. This year's crop was selected in a two-stage portfolio competition where a jury of architects selected the winners. The deciding jury included several previous winners like Dominic Leong (2017), Fernanda Canales (2018), and Marlon Blackwell (1998), giving the process a familial feel. Laureates for 2019 come from across North America and almost all are partnerships or collaboratives—capital letters feature prominently, too.  SCHAUM/SHIEH will lecture at the Scholastic Auditorium at 130 Mercer Street, New York, New York, at 7:00 p.m. on March 21, as part of the Emerging Voices lecture series.

For SCHAUM/SHIEH, the city is not a mere backdrop for designing buildings. Instead, it is a source of productive potential and a platform for theoretical and built experimentation that has informed the firm’s relationship to design from its founding in 2010.

The studio’s founding partners, Rosalyne Shieh and Troy Schaum, first explored this interest in speculative projects for Detroit and the Taiwanese port city of Kaohsiung. Their early urban proposals for Detroit led to an installation at the 2012 Venice Architecture Biennale of a room that was also a staircase and public seating, one of many prototype structures they envisioned could infill the spaces between vacant homes in the city. This design, part of a larger project called “Sponge Urbanism,” challenged the divide between domestic and public space and confronted the broader narrative about vacancy in Detroit.

This intersection of urbanism, form, and identity is something that the studio has carried into its commissioned work, especially for cultural institutions and spaces with hybrid programs. These include the Judd Foundation’s buildings in Marfa, Texas; White Oak Music Hall in Houston; and most recently, the Transart Foundation, also in Houston.

While its Judd Foundation work is an exercise in restraint, aimed at preserving and restoring the artist Donald Judd’s vision for more than a dozen buildings in Marfa, projects like White Oak show how the designers play with form, massing, and landscape to create a distinctive destination for Houston’s music lovers and a new open space for the city as a whole. The main two-story concert hall, which contains multiple stages for different types of music and audience sizes, is part of a larger 7-acre complex which includes a lawn for outdoor performances and an open-air pavilion and bar, converted from an existing shed on the site.

Across the studio's diverse range of projects, abstract representation and diagrammatic processes are essential tools to generate concepts and collaborate with partners and clients. But, as Schaum explained, “We always like to come back to where that kind of set-making and pattern-making starts to break down and question its own set of possibilities, where the sets open up new possibilities for inhabitation rather than where they complete themselves in perfect studies of pattern or complex assemblages.”

This is evident in SCHAUM/SHIEH’s Transart Foundation (a 2018 AN Best of Design Awards Building of the Year). The project includes two structures comprising a private residence, art studio, and exhibition space, and is located across from the Menil Collection within a largely residential neighborhood.

Transart's white stucco facades, with their thick massing, look substantial, but are peeled away at the edges and corners, giving the overall appearance of lightness, like curled paper. The sculptural massing of the main building, juxtaposed against its relatively compact size— closer to a large house than a museum—also makes the foundation appear more monumental than it is, demonstrating the way SCHAUM/SHIEH works with scale to blur the lines between private and public space. This exercise in form and material produces unexpected moments and transitions that serve the multi-functional art space well.

But ultimately, the practice is most interested in its ongoing dialogue with the broader world. As Shieh explained, “I want the buildings that we make to belong to the world, and not to architecture. We don’t necessarily put them out there in a way that we hope that they tell architecture what they are, but that they somehow produce some kind of surprise.”

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MODU's multi-disciplinary approach to architecture equips them for any task

Every year the Architectural League of New York recognizes eight dynamic young firms as Emerging Voices that have the potential to become leaders in the field. Historic winners like Morphosis (1983) and Toshiko Mori (1992) have become today's lions, and practices like Johnston Marklee (2007) and Tatiana Bilbao (2010) have jumped to new heights after recent wins. This year's crop was selected in a two-stage portfolio competition where a jury of architects selected the winners. The deciding jury included several previous winners like Dominic Leong (2017), Fernanda Canales (2018), and Marlon Blackwell (1998), giving the process a familial feel. Laureates for 2019 come from across North America and almost all are partnerships or collaboratives—capital letters feature prominently, too.  MODU will lecture at the Scholastic Auditorium at 130 Mercer Street, New York, New York, at 7:00 p.m. on March 28, as part of the Emerging Voices lecture series. Phu Hoang and Rachely Rotem are architects without borders. This is not to say they’re traveling around the world doing good where it's most needed—although they are indeed doing both of these things. Rather, they’re working toward an urban future that fosters deeper and more direct connections between people and places. It’s not just a form of design, says Rotem. “It’s a form of wellbeing.” Their Cloud Seeding pavilion elegantly embodies this connection between architecture and the environment. Designed to shade a sun-battered plaza in front of the Design Museum in Holon, Israel, the pavilion is a minimal interpretation of a vernacular greenhouse with a ceiling that encloses 30,000 balls rolling freely in the wind. The shaded areas beneath the pavilion change with the weather, reprogramming the plaza. The idea of “climate” has become abstract and politicized, but weather is immediate. “Weather, for us, is a medium to allow for experiences,” says Rotem. “We see a world that is overabundant with information, but truth is unclear. Connecting to the environment is a form of truth.” Hoang agrees, adding, “I think it's important that architecture play the role of connector rather than separator. That may mean drawing the public realm into the private realm, and rethinking what both those spaces can be.” It may also mean creating indoor weather. Intake is a proposal to adapt an abandoned shipbuilding factory for light-manufacturing and commercial use. The 50,000-square-foot structure will be subdivided and conditioned by invisible walls of high-velocity air that create and maintain distinctive climactic zones tuned to each place and program. MODU’s fascination with abandoned buildings—what they call the “Incomplete City”—solidified during their recent Rome Prize fellowship, when they visited hundreds of unfinished structures. They’re building on that experience with the interdisciplinary pro bono initiative Second Life. This project aims to help revitalize communities through temporary, self-sustaining interventions—“mini-buildings”—in vacant structures. Currently, MODU is working with urban planner Naomi Hersson-Ringskog and the residents of Newburgh, New York to help preserve, protect, and program the city’s 300 vacant buildings until the town has the resources to find a more permanent solution. Hoang and Rotem also blur the boundaries of their practice, working in multiple modes simultaneously. Their conceptual work, built work, research, teaching, and urban initiatives inform one another and allow the firm to continually develop, test, and refine their ideas. Through discourse and design at scales both large and small, MODU’s indoor cities and outdoor rooms ultimately ask one question: How can we live better?
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Clarity is key for popular Portland-based firm Waechter Architecture

Every year the Architectural League of New York recognizes eight dynamic young firms as Emerging Voices that have the potential to become leaders in the field. Historic winners like Morphosis (1983) and Toshiko Mori (1992) have become today’s lions, and practices like Johnston Marklee (2007) and Tatiana Bilbao (2010) have jumped to new heights after recent wins. This year’s crop was selected in a two-stage portfolio competition where a jury of architects selected the winners. The deciding jury included several previous winners like Dominic Leong (2017), Fernanda Canales (2018), and Marlon Blackwell (1998), giving the process a familial feel. Laureates for 2019 come from across North America and almost all are partnerships or collaboratives—capital letters feature prominently, too.  Waechter Architecture will lecture at the Scholastic Auditorium at 130 Mercer Street, New York, New York, at 7:00 p.m. on March 14, as part of the Emerging Voices lecture series. For Ben Waechter, practicing architecture is an investigation into creating spaces with clarity. As founder of the Portland, Oregon–based firm, Waechter Architecture, he tries to design buildings that feature clear, visual identities that resonate with the people who experience them. The way the firm tackles this goal is through an informal, ongoing study Waechter calls “The Clarity Project.” He encourages his team to analyze their projects, and those of others, at every stage, from schematic design to post-construction. In doing this, they aim to discover the best ways to create a distinct internal logic for an individual design and reveal the underlying relationships that make it successful. “To us, a strong sense of clarity tends to be in places that simply feel the best to be in,” he said. According to Waechter, that’s one of the main themes that must be teased out when reviewing a project. Another theme is composition. The firm’s Tower House, built in 2014, presents a tubular facade with large-scale cutouts that organize the interior. It is situated on a steep site previously deemed “unbuildable,” so Waechter’s team envisioned the four-story home as a stacked structure. “We spend a lot of time making sure our projects are distilled down to a composition that’s whole and complete by itself,” he said. “If you take one point away or add something, it doesn’t work anymore.” Equally important is creating clarity of figure-ground. Waechter determines the programming within a building from the beginning. “We like to think of our plans as being carved out of a building mass and then using poches as secondary support spaces.” This strict editing process, as well as the firm’s clear commitment to minimalism, is inspired by Swiss architecture and Waechter’s own architectural journey. As a former employee of Renzo Piano, he takes the refined details seriously. “There’s a constructional logic to Renzo Piano’s buildings,” he said. “One similar thread between our work is that we also try to include a few details done really well in order to create a stronger identity.” In some cases, Waechter distinguishes his architecture by simply framing views of the surrounding locale. For a recently completed project at Furioso Vineyards in Dundee, Oregon, the firm designed a glass-enclosed tasting room on a raised platform. The height allows guests to feel as if they’re hovering above the vineyard while simultaneously connecting them with the wine-making process. If one thing is clear, it’s that clients are attracted to Waechter Architecture’s meticulous attention to detail and old-school analytical practices. Though its award-winning portfolio largely showcases expertise in single-family home design, with the vineyard project and their upcoming Society Hotel in Bingen, Washington, they’re branching out to into new territory.
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Announcing the Architectural League's 2019 Emerging Voices

Every year the Architectural League of New York recognizes eight dynamic young firms as Emerging Voices that have the potential to become leaders in the field. Historic winners like Morphosis (1983) and Toshiko Mori (1992) have become today's lions, and practices like Johnston Marklee (2007) and Tatiana Bilbao (2010) have jumped to new heights after recent wins. This year's crop was selected in a two-stage portfolio competition where a jury of architects selected the winners. The deciding jury included several previous winners like Dominic Leong (2017), Fernanda Canales (2018), and Marlon Blackwell (1998), giving the process a familial feel. Laureates for 2019 come from across North America and almost all are partnerships or collaboratives—capital letters feature prominently, too. The League will hold a lecture series from this year’s winners every Thursday in March at the Scholastic Auditorium at 130 Mercer Street, New York, New York. We profiled this year's winners, snippets of which are included below. Click on the images for the full profiles. And now, the winners are: Ignacio Urquiza, Bernardo Quinzaños, Centro de Colaboración Arquitectónica Bernardo Quinzaños, Ignacio Urquiza, and Mexico City–based Centro de Colaboración Arquitectónica (CCA) have over a decade of experience working toward their goal of using architecture as a “tool for change.” ... Urquiza explained, “We’ve always had a particular interest in architecture that is precise, yet at the same time has the flexibility of being able to give itself to each space.” He added, “Ambiguity is what gives architecture the freedom to be owned by its users.” UUfie Despite being just ten years old, UUfie has snagged commissions in high-profile locations around the world that any practice would envy. Few firms of a comparable size have worked in three continents, and UUfie’s founders are aware of the benefits of having worked around the world; they credit their global experience with bringing “more cultural awareness and diversity in thinking” to their practice. ... “In Canada, there is a growth in supporting Canadian talent and potential for establishing a vibrant design scene that is broadening its perspective. In Japan, this scene is highly established and appears to lean now toward a retrospective view,” [cofounder Irene] Gardpoit said. “Canada is a culturally diverse country in comparison to Japan. This diversity brings on its challenges, but it is also unique in that it does not necessarily have its own established identity. It allows us to experiment.”

Waechter Architecture

For Ben Waechter, practicing architecture is an investigation into creating spaces with clarity. ... “To us, a strong sense of clarity tends to be in places that simply feel the best to be in,” [Waechter] said. According to Waechter, that’s one of the main themes that must be teased out when reviewing a project.

MODU

Phu Hoang and Rachely Rotem…blur the boundaries of their practice, working in multiple modes simultaneously. Their conceptual work, built work, research, teaching, and urban initiatives inform one another and allow the firm to continually develop, test, and refine their ideas. Through discourse and design at scales both large and small, MODU’s indoor cities and outdoor rooms ultimately ask one question: How can we live better?

SCHAUM/SHIEH

For SCHAUM/SHIEH, the city is not a mere backdrop for designing buildings. Instead, it is a source of productive potential and a platform for theoretical and built experimentation that has informed the firm’s relationship to design from its founding in 2010.

Colloqate

Colloqate Design, a multidisciplinary, New Orleans–based “nonprofit design justice practice” founded in 2017 by Bryan Lee Jr.—Sue Mobley came on in 2018—with the goal of “building power through the design of public, civic, and cultural spaces,” is setting a different path relative to other design offices. … “We want to be the most radical design firm out there,” Lee said, “and we need to build buildings to do that.”

FreelandBuck

FreelandBuck builds drawings. Not in the traditional sense of constructing what’s represented by a drawing set, but in the sense that its architecture directly evokes carefully constructed perspectives and painstakingly hand-drawn renderings. “We think about drawing at the scale of architectural space,” says partner Brennan Buck, “as an end product, not a means to build.”

Davies Toews

Partners Trattie Davies and Jonathan Toews are no strangers to working around tight spatial and financial limitations. Whether it’s a linear park that rises between a descending set of switchback staircases in Hudson, New York; a perspective-defying, split-level park and art gallery in Memphis, Tennessee; or a three-story townhouse in Brooklyn, their projects are united by the common thread of extreme site-specificity. “Our strategy has been: Do first, analyze second,” said Davies.
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3D printed furniture rolls into Socrates Sculpture Park

Ithaca-based studio HANNAH has installed a series of 3D printed seats across Socrates Sculpture Park in Astoria, Queens, for the summer, extending their architectural experiments in large-scale 3D printing to sectional furniture. RRRolling Stones is the 2018 winner of Folly/Function, an annual competition held by the Architectural League of New York in partnership with the sculpture park, and will officially open to the public on July 12. 3D printing is something of a passion for HANNAH cofounders and Cornell University professors Leslie Lok and Sasa Zivkovic, and they used Folly/Function to publicize the practical side of the technology. At a full-scale printing demonstration in the sculpture park on July 11, the team discussed the technical challenges in fabricating custom seating that could stand up to wear and tear in the park, as well as the design of the massive printer itself. The seats in RRRolling Stones were designed for maximum versatility. All of the chairs have a graphic silhouette and can be rolled to different angles to accommodate different seating styles. The chairs can also be pushed together to create a modular benching system to accommodate larger events in the park. None of this would have been possible without the printer, a steel frame structure cobbled together for approximately $5,000 from open-source plans on the internet and assembled with help from students at the Cornell Robotic Construction Laboratory (RCL). Material is gravity-fed through a PVC hopper at the top and the nozzle uses an auger to restrict the flow of concrete. The printing arm is attached to a pulley and counterweight so that it can rapidly move up and down. Each structure is printed in thin layers, and the mix of machine vibrations, the viscosity of the concrete, wind, the slope of the floor, and human error mean that no two pieces are the same. Printing the seats and their miniature counterparts involves much more human interaction than a 'set and forget' desktop 3D printer. A human needs to mix the concrete, feed it into the hopper, test the consistency, adjust the print thickness on the fly, and correct gaps and streaks in the prints before they dry. The concrete substrate is a blend of Portland cement, a plasticizer for elasticity, and nylon threads for added strength, making the final mix more of a mortar than true concrete. The smaller printed pieces are freestanding, but the stress faced by the larger chairs meant that HANNAH had to cut and embed custom rebar structures into the full-sized seats. The seats were fabricated at Cornell, and HANNAH packed the interior of each with gravel during the printing to stabilize the chairs throughout the manufacturing process. Lok, Zivkovic, and members of the RCL will be at Socrates Sculpture Park running a printing demonstration tonight from 5:00 to 7:00 P.M. under the park’s gantry. Afterward, visitors can take in live jazz as part of the park’s monthly series. RRRolling Stones will be on display for the rest of the summer. Making of - RRRolling Stones from HANNAH Office on Vimeo.
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What is architecture's objective? The Architectural League's 2018 Prize show proposes answers

"How might we determine the facts and values that motivate the production of architecture in a post-truth era?" That was the question that entrants were asked to respond to for this year's Prize for Young Architects + Designers from The Architectural League of New York. The winners presented an array of proposals across a variety of media that obliquely took on the theme. The 2018 competition, titled Objective, was won by Anya Sirota of Akoaki, Bryony Roberts of Bryony Roberts Studio, Gabriel Cuéllar and Athar Mufreh of Cadaster, Coryn Kempster of Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster, Alison Von Glinow and Lap Chi Kwong of Kwong Von Glinow, and Dan Spiegel of SAW // Spiegel Aihara Workshop. The Prize is an annual award established in 1981 to celebrate young, successful practices from across the United States, and the exhibition of winners is now on view at the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center at the Parsons School of Design, running through August 4. Visitors to the Design Center are first confronted by Lap Chi Kwong and Alison Von Glinow’s plywood model titled Table Top Apartments. It runs the length of the storefront and consists of circular, square, and rectangular geometries stacked on top of one another via thin columns. The Chicago-based architecture practice was founded one year ago and is already reaching great heights; they recently won first prize in the New York Housing Challenge 2017 and the Hong Kong Pixel Home Challenge. Their installation is a study model of their New York housing proposal, which makes use of modules “based on the form of stacking table tops to generate towers with setbacks and cascading balconies.” Visitors to the exhibition are immediately drawn to the graphic vinyl pattern that runs down the west wall of the gallery onto the floor. Geometric cutouts of marble and stone textures are collaged together by Bryony Roberts. Her exploration with patterns is said to be inspired by her experience as a Rome Prize Fellow, her previous works at The American Academy in Rome, and an exhibition at the Storefront for Art and Architecture in collaboration with Mabel O. Wilson. Roberts toggles between practice and teaching as a professor at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and an architect who combines architecture and performance. Anya Sirota's installation cuts an eye-catching figure in the middle of the show. The unconventional models are composed of silhouettes of architectural objects overlaid on wilderness backdrops. Sirota, founded by Akoaki with Jean Louis Farges, frequently designs temporary art installations that respond to public programs, including a geometric artwork in Detroit that sets the stage for an open-air opera.
Next, to the models, a rack of colorful postcards exhibits the work of Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster. Their work uses color in imaginative ways, with a neon-pink swing set named Full Circle originally installed in Buffalo, and the Sky House in Ontario, which features interiors painted in different shades of blue, complementing the green tones of the idyllic Stoney Lake scenery. Visitors are free to take postcards from the exhibition. Nine models of the same dimensions by Dan Spiegel are mounted on the wall. With inset lighting effects, the relief models lead the audience through tiny spaces. Spiegel’s firm, SAW // Spiegel Aihara Workshop, with Megumi Aihara have recently completed Try-On Truck, a mobile store that opens up with transformable wood and glass panels. Gabriel Cuéllar and Athar Mufreh’s four research studios titled the architecture of territories are “parcels, rights-of-way, watersheds, and urban ecologies.” Their firm Cadaster is concerned with the environment and landscape, with projects on the New York Canal System, Quebec urban planning, and the American Black Churches in the South. Their works are nuanced reflections on cities and territories.
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Paul Lewis elected newest President of Architectural League of New York

Paul Lewis, FAIA, and principal and co-founder of New York’s Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis (LTL Architects), has succeeded Billie Tsien to become the Architectural League of New York’s 62nd President. Tatiana Bilbao and photographer Kris Graves were also elected to join the League’s board. At the League’s 137th annual meeting on June 27 at the Cooper Union's Arthur A. Houghton Jr. Gallery, members voted to elect Lewis president and replace outgoing President Tsien, who had served from 2014 through 2018; Tsien will stay on the League’s Board of Directors. Bilbao has been elevated to a member of the League’s Class of 2021, and Graves has become the new Vice-President for Photography. At the annual meeting, League executive director Rosalie Genevro spoke on Tsien’s lasting contributions to the organization, explicitly her “manifold generosity, generosity that extends from deep interest in and enthusiasm for the work presented by the League’s myriad competition winners, lecturers, writers, and photographers, to willingness to use any and all contacts she may have on behalf of the League, to unstinting commitment of time to League affairs, to open-handed financial support—and readiness to encourage others to be supporters as well. “The last two years of Billie’s service have coincided, as we all know well, with a very fraught political climate. She has been clear about the importance of organizations such as the League standing strong as proponents of a pluralist, diverse, tolerant, compassionate society.” Lewis is no stranger to the Architectural League, having served on the nonprofit’s board since 2006 and as a frequent juror in the League’s competitions. LTL was selected as an Emerging Voices winner in 2002 and has gone on to finish both large academic projects, such as the revamp of Cornell University’s 160,000-square-foot Upson Hall, as well as speculative research initiatives.