Posts tagged with "app":

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Artist Artie Vierkant uses augmented reality to put his art in your hands

Brooklyn-based artist Artie Vierkant melds photography, commercial printing, and sculpture. For Vierkant, there is no real hierarchical distinction between art experienced in real life or in a photograph. In Vierkant’s post-digital world, 2-D and 3-D, image and object, original and copy, exist on a level playing field. He often takes photos of his installation, modifies them, and repurposes them as new works in and of themselves. Most recently, this has taken the form of an augmented reality (AR) app, Image Object (a term Vierkant termed in 2010 to describe work which “exist[s] somewhere between physical sculptures and altered documentation images”), released in conjunction with his exhibition Rooms greet people by name at Galerie Perrotin on the Lower East Side. Vierkant sat down with the Architect’s Newspaper to discuss the app, the boundaries between 2-D and 3-D, and what augmented reality means for the future of public space. https://www.instagram.com/p/Bfq5LJuhF_9/?taken-by=avierkant Architect's Newspaper: Along with your exhibition Rooms greet people by name at Galerie Perrotin in New York, you’ve released an app, Image Object. Can you give us a little background on the app? Artie Vierkant: The app is functionally just a camera app. Part of the idea is for people to take photos and videos with it. For me, that’s just another extension of the work. It started because I realized augmented reality platforms are basically what I do already with the installation view editing in a very simple way. I started playing around with those tools and then realizing that if I applied the same principles as what happened in the installation views, AR could essentially create the exact same aesthetic experience, but perceptually in space, where you could wander through and around the work. It takes the reproduction in a photo on my phone or online or in a book and renders it spatially. AN: Like much of your work, this app troubles the boundary of 2-D and 3-D, perhaps taking it even further than what you've done before. If you're using the Image Object app in the exhibition, there’s a simultaneity between the arts instantiation in the gallery space and in the flat space of your screen. Artie Vierkant: I’m always quite serious about these points of intersection. AN: But, on the other hand, the app works anywhere. You can attend the exhibition without going to the gallery. Artie Vierkant: Or make your own. AN: I was reading somewhere that you said digital space was “susceptible to modification.” How might we think of physical space along these lines? One of the big questions for AR is where the boundaries between physical spatial experience and digital experience are. And if those boundaries even matter. Artie Vierkant: I think it’s becoming increasingly obvious that those distinctions and boundaries don't really matter. So many of these technologies are just prosthetics that extend our regular perceived lived reality. The idea of having two totally separate realms has been long ago debunked. We’re living in an incredibly weird time. AN: The idea of being “post-internet” presented the notion that the internet became so pervasive it just was simply the background of our world, not some special, fetishizable thing apart from it. It infiltrated existence. Now everything is passively designed to accommodate our use of the internet, to accommodate computation—possibly without even conscious thought. What sort of spaces and designs can we imagine as AR becomes increasingly high-level and increasingly entrenched? Artie Vierkant: This is what would maybe be the really interesting possibilities with AR. For example, buildings are designed knowing that a certain type of use is going to be predominant within them, but AR actually creates a situation where for the first time you could actually introduce a completely other layer. You could say that that's not totally the case because many things you could physically make, you could waste a bunch of material and resources doing it though. AN: The gallery is almost a perfect metaphor for this though because it is always claiming to be an empty, evacuated space. Artie Vierkant: The white cube will not stop trying to attest that it is a neutral zone or a completely empty space of limitless possibility. Which is obviously false. AN: AR takes that notion of emptiness and asks why bother filling it with stuff when you can fill it digitally. In this way, the gallery is the most extreme test case for the relationship between physical space and AR. Another interesting problem of AR is its relation to the private/public in space. The gallery is a space we occupy with others, but the app’s view of it is limited to our own phones. What does AR mean for public space and togetherness in physical space? Artie Vierkant: I have my own assumptions about how a lot of these technologies will play out and continue to be developed. I don't think that the more utopian options are going to play out in the short term, frankly. Clearly one of the issues that we have right now with "digital space” is its relationship to corporations. Social media space is basically just comprised of huge advertising companies. You could imagine a more egalitarian version of this under capitalism where you're both selling you're both your resources, where you're actively selling your attention and being remunerated for it. AN: Still, that remains capitalism as such, if a less extreme variety of it. Even the more radical proposals that have existed have quickly turned into commercial tools; if late capitalism is good at anything, it's rapidly subsuming anything that was initially meant to oppose it. Artie Vierkant: But, outside of an individualized experience which the market is predisposed to, you could also imagine a very strange reality that would be produced by having an augmented reality share a collectivized experience where you have a separate life over everything or different spaces where you could go into, like a white cube, and could load up some stuff that people have left there. Rooms greet people by name will be on view at Galerie Perrotin until April 8. Image Object will remain downloadable from the Apple App Store. Artie Vierkant: Rooms greet people by name Galerie Perrotin 130 Orchard Street New York, NY Through April 8    
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The resurgence of illustration in architecture and why it’s critical

Morpholio Trace’s Joey Swerdlin and architect Jim Keen have teamed up to discuss the art of illustration in architecture and how it impacts the communication of design to our peers, clients and ultimately the public. With the inundation of photo-realistic representations of architecture, it seems that far too often we lose focus on what is important in design and what needs to be conveyed at the early phases of a project. "These high fidelity images lend credibility to a project vision, but draw more attention to surfaces and details when the argument should be forming around space, place, and use," said Joey Swerdlin, Morpholio community director. It would not surprise many in our field that when asked, several architects admitted spending more time representing their work than actually designing it. There has always been a fine line between process and presentation, one feeding the other, but have we gone too far? Have we forgotten some of the most powerful tools in our storytelling arsenal and how they operate to filter and convey meaning? Morpholio Trace + Jim Keen from Morpholio on Vimeo. Jim Keen would say yes to this proposition. A seasoned architect with an extensive portfolio of built work, Keen ultimately turned his focus back toward illustration, where he finds the most satisfaction. His professional experience provided insight on the delicacy required to communicate a persuasive yet open-ended view of a space or project. According to Jim, “Today, computer renderings have lost their impact, leading the client to obsess over carpet colors or door handles meanwhile losing sight of the overall design. Hand drawings and sketches return the conversation to the design of space by focusing on architecture, form, and people.” Morpholio, a software company founded by architects, seeks to create tools that bridge the gap between the vitality of hand drawing and the intelligence of digital workflows. Jim’s work provides a fascinating case study for such experimentation and is a telling example of the desires that have shaped one of their most widely used apps, Trace Pro. The app replicates trace paper and the tools architects use to sketch, draft, and render. This new kind of interface for design is something in which Keen finds not only creative comfort, but also artistic freedom. “When I work through a design illustration with a client, I need software that 'disappears' and allows me to concentrate completely on the work." Keen’s work powerfully demonstrates that the act of illustration by hand can return the focus to that which should be central in architectural communication by editing out extraneous details, especially in the early concept phase. The diagrammatic nature of the images seems to leave room for evolution, and interpretation, thereby encouraging concepts to be further probed for new and perhaps even more novel possibilities. With the gift of the touchscreen, architects would be crazy not to find ways to integrate analog and digital methods of designing, taking advantage of the intuition and delight that working by hand is known to amplify. Furthermore, it is an opportunity to advance a discipline and language that was honed for centuries into the next era of style, culture, and craft. Reincorporating the hand drawing into a seamless digital workflow is fundamental for the post-digital architect, something that Jim Keen has found by drawing in Trace. Download Trace here. To see more of Jim's work, or request an illustration, please visit his website here.
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A new stenciling app aims to make life easier for architects and designers

Using a stencil, either for a plan or section, is nothing new for architects. Whether it's marking the outline of a 1:20 scale person, bed, kitchen unit, or tree, stencils have been making life easier for designers for ages. Today's architects are well aware of the wealth of digital stencils available online, however, app developer Morpholio now claims to haven taken this one step further.

In what they claim to be a "stencil revolution," Morpholio has unveiled a customizable stencil tool that can be used in conjunction with Trace App (also by Morpholio). Essentially, "Stencil" allows users to quickly turn images into stencils. The patent pending tool also provides the option of turning this into a customizable template, with the stencils themselves being scalable.

"Creating stencils sits perfectly between the architect's sketch and the quick photo," said Mark Collins, a co-creator of the tool speaking in a press release. "You're trying to capture something—a texture, pattern, or detail that you want to use. Sketching is great but slow. Taking a photo buries it in the photo album. Generating a stencil automatically creates an incredible tool that you can utilize in various ways. The stencil is the quickest path to [distilling] an image into an actionable idea."

The app asks users to set the contrast, inversion, and any transformations when going through the stencil creation process. When used with Trace App, stencils can be colored and have textures applied through brush types such as pencil, charcoal, marker, and brush. This can be done by setting the stencil and sketching over it with any brush or color. In addition, stencils can be used to form patterns and art, all of which can be applied "at any scale."

While custom stencils can be shared through social media and cloud services, Morpholio's app comes with a selection of pre-made illustrations and symbols that have been "artfully created for architecture, interiors, industrial and graphic design."

"Here we witness, through art, the power of stencils delivering rigorous detail with extreme efficiency; an almost perfect optimization of craft, process, and drama," said Toru Hasegawa, Morpholio co-creator. Meanwhile, Anna Kenoff, another co-creator said: "Allowing designers to draw and work in a fast and uninhibited space is the path to discovery. We want to bring these opportunities into the digital realm, combining analog process with new media that stays at your fingertips and keeps the creative process flowing."

To download Morpholio's apps, visit their website.

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Crowd-Design: Transit Designer Wants Your Ideas, Not Just Your Money

Greater Good Studio wants to reinvent crowd-sourcing. Their budding campaign, Designing Chicago, aims to build the ultimate public transit app using public data from the Chicago Transit Authority. But the interesting part is where you come in. Not only is the project crowd-funded — it’s crowd-designed. “Since it is called public transit,” founder George Aye said in the team’s Kickstarter video, “it only made sense that we designed this application with the participation of the public.” The app’s features are still up for debate, but Greater Good said they hope to create a “new, truly user-centered tool.” Ideas in the Kickstarter video include automatic weather alerts, the ability to work backward from your calendar to suggest transit routes, and two-way communication with CTA to suggest system improvements. Aye worked at IDEO for 7 years before becoming lead designer for the CTA. The group also has the backing of Massimo Vignelli, designer of the NYC subway map, who is an advisory board member. They are anticipating an April 2013 launch date. Watch an interview with Vignelli here: