Posts tagged with "Zaha Hadid":

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Japan urged to scale back Tokyo Olympic Stadium

The Sports Minister for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, Hakubum Shimomura, is set to scale back the approved stadium, designed by Iraqi-born architect, Zaha Hadid. The decision was made in the wake of a big uproar from some leading Japanese architects who claim that the stadium is "too big and too expensive." The Minister did not give specifics on how the structure would be scaled down, but stressed that the original design concept would be maintained. The futuristic mothership-like structure which was planned to seat 80,000 people, is estimated to cost $3 billion, which is more than double of the original budget. Pritzker Prize–winning architect, Fumihiko Maki, urged that the design be reworked to a “more sustainable stadium.” His views are shared by approximately one hundred other experts in the field. Zaha Hadid Architects have responded by saying that the space will be highly flexible, and can be used for a diverse range of events beyond the Olympics, such as music concerts. They have also expressed willingness to discuss design changes in order to make the scheme more cost-effective and sustainable. With construction set to commence in 2014, the design team will be hard pressed to trim down the stadium without compromising its original concept and structural integrity.
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Glacial Inspiration Leads Zaha Hadid to Her Latest Curvilinear Product Design

Zaha Hadid has once again expanded her curvilinear design prospects. From wine bottles to superyachts, the starchitect has been quite productive in her recent development of a variety of non-architecture products, and none with right angles. Her latest endeavor is in the world of furniture. For the current exhibition, Liquid Glacial, at David Gill Galleries in London, Hadid has unveiled a new piece in her ongoing series of ice-influenced tables. Inspired by the unique geometry of glaciers, “Prototype Liquid Glacial Table” is an evolution of the previous tables, but all explore a seemingly contradictory existence of two simultaneous states of water. Polished to resemble pure glacial ice, Prototype Liquid Glacial Table has the dynamism and curves signature of Hadid’s architectural designs. In clear Plexiglas, four columns resembling cyclones of liquid water are frozen as solid table legs. These supports seem to originate from the horizontal tabletop, a smooth, undisturbed plane. The underside of this flat surface is a series of ripples in clear acrylic, as if the glacier were still liquid and the table were truly made of water. Hadid’s 2012 Liquid Glacier furniture series was shortlisted by London’s Design Museum as a “Best Design of 2012.”
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MAD Museum gets Out of Hand

A cross-section of postdigital design work illustrates the role of parametrics in the built environment.

Spawned from his 2011 show on Patrick Jouin, Museum of Arts & Design (MAD) curator Ronald Labaco conceived Out of Hand as a more comprehensive show that clarified the role of digital design, from its capabilities to its significance in our daily lives. “People just didn’t get it,” said Labaco of Jouin’s 2011 MAD show. “Unless you’re immersed in it, it can be hard to understand so I thought if we showed something like this in the galleries again, we needed to provide information that can be digested more clearly.” Staged across three floors of the museum, with two exterior sculptures, Labaco said the show is an important program for MAD among other New York art institutions like MoMA, Cooper Hewitt, and the New Museum. The goal to raise awareness of 3D printing is timely, by chance. “Paolo Antonelli’s Design and the Elastic Mind, and two shows from Material Connection were complements to my show for the uninitiated,” Labaco explained. Out of Hand’s broad scope includes digital designing and fabrication processes like CNC milling, digital weaving and knitting, laser cutting, and 3D printing to display how these technologies influence the built environment. “It’s a historical look at the last 8 years and works from as early as 2005 are incorporated because, in my mind, that was when the major shift between rapid prototyping and 3D printing really occurred,” said Labaco.
  • Curator Ronald Labaco
  • Location Museum of Arts & Design, New York
  • Date October 2013– July 2014
  • Materials ceramic, concrete, polyurethane, resin, PVC, metal, gypsum, wax, paper, wood, jacquard
  • Process water jet cutting, laser cutting, laser sintering, 3D printing, digital weaving
Organized in six themes, a cross-section of traditional methods and new design capabilities are illustrated by architects crafting art, artists doing design, and photographers making sculpture. Approximately half a dozen pieces were commissioned for the show while others were an extension of existing works: For example, a chair by Jan Habraken evolved into the more comprehensive Charigenics. Placards for each piece call out production methods, from 3D printing (10 materials are featured) to digital knitting, underscoring the multi-step creation process to make the point that digital design isn’t only press-and-print. And many of the show’s pieces are a combination of old-world handcrafting and newer digital geometries and computations. Pieces like Rapid Racer, Bosch’s 3D-printed vehicle fabricated over 10 days and weighing just 29 pounds, and Zaha Hadid’s Liquid Glacial "Smoke", a coffee table CNC-milled from polished plexiglass, illustrate the functional role of digital design. Data input is actively incorporated through two interactive pieces from Francios Brument, for which he developed his own scripting, as well as a Shapeways workshop that is open to the public. Traditional forms are realized by new methods in Nendo’s 3D-printed paper boxes that are lacquered with traditional urushi for a ringed faux bois. Other featured artists, architects, and designers include Richard DuPont, Greg Lynn, Anish Kapoor, Marc Newson, Frank Stella, Daniel Libeskind, and Maya Lin. Just as dynamic as the digital disciplines themselves, new pieces are being added throughout the show’s run. Look for a new piece from Iris Van Herpen by mid-November. Out of Hand will remain on view through July 6, 2014.
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Zaha Hadid Designs A Limited Edition Wine Bottle

From high-end hotels interiors to deluxe dollhouses and state-of-the-art superyachts, Queen of the Curve, Zaha Hadid, has been expanding her signature sinuous style to all corners of the design map. The latest unexpected design to emerge from the architect’s versatile office comes in the form of a limited-edition wine bottle for Austrian winemaker Leo Hillinger. For the 999-bottle edition of the winery’s 2009 vintage red, Icon Hill, Hadid created a curvaceous form derived from the profile of liquid droplets. A concave indentation along one side of the bottle’s surface matches the curvature of the bottle’s opposite side, so if you happen to be the proud owner of more than one of these bottles, you can create an interlocking conga-line of high-design wine. At the base of the bottle, the architect has designed a small dimple to assist in correct pouring and the collection of sediments. The bottle’s geometries were created using NURB-based CAD software, from which cast iron molds were produced to form the glass.
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Zaha Hadid Designs a Superyacht

Taking her sleek, space-age forms to the sea, Zaha Hadid has teamed up with Hamburg, Germany–based master shipbuilders Blohm+Voss to launch a fleet of signature superyachts. Together they have created The Unique Circle Yacht, a family of five distinct 90m yachts based on the design philosophies and sculptural contours of a 420-foot master prototype that was recently displayed in an exhibition of Hadid’s work at the David Gill Gallery in London. The web-like design of the yachts’ distinctively-Zaha upper exoskeleton was supposedly informed by fluid dynamics, underwater ecosystems, and the structural systems of marine organisms, while the hull was the result of intense hydrodynamic research. Hadid broke with the traditional horizontal order of yacht design to create a fluid, naturalistic whole which seamlessly connects the ship’s various elements through a dynamic yet cohesive framework. As Hadid explained in a statement, a yacht is “a dynamic object that moves in dynamic environments,” and as such, its design “must incorporate additional parameters beyond those for architecture—which all become much more extreme on water. Each yacht is an engineered platform that integrates specific hydrodynamic and structural demands together with the highest levels of comfort, spatial quality and safety.” Out of the five Unique Circle Yachts, JAZZ is the first of which to be fully specified and detailed by the naval architects at Blohm+Voss. Each of the five yachts will be inimitable products of collaboration, combining the design language of the original prototype, specific technical refinements to address the distinct use of each yacht, and the individual requests of the vessels’ prestigious owners. As Dr. Herbert Aly, CEO and Managing Partner of Blohm+Voss explained in a statement, this formula allows for the creation of unique, exceptional objects of complete design, while offering an adaptable template for future innovation. “On an aesthetic level a superyacht is a great design task as everything is customised down to the last detail,” said Aly. “A superyacht is by definition an exercise in total design, where every detail is looked at with attention and refinement. In the past, in the era of steam liners, there has been an attempt of utilizing ship building elements in architecture. Zaha Hadid and her team have taken this ethos and created a bold new vision and a new benchmark in the design of superyachts.” “The idea of the Unique Circle Yachts allows for variation of a genotype and its phenotypes,” Aly continued, “offering a range of possible solutions based on an cognate platform. As a result Zaha Hadid’s design is malleable to suit the very individual wishes and needs of a potential customer, which lies at the heart of Blohm+Voss’ approach to yacht design. The strength of the design lies not just in its functionality and form, but also its effortless adaptability.”
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Jean Nouvel’s National Art Museum of China Design Inspired by Calligraphy

Over a star-studded semi-finalist list of Western architects, Pritztker-Prize winning French architect Jean Nouvel has been awarded the commission to design the world’s largest art museum: the new National Art Museum of China in Beijing. The 130,000 square meters NAMOC building is intended to exhibit works by 20th-century and traditional artists from worldwide. The Financial Times reported earlier this year that Jean Nouvel’s design idea as that of a single ink brushstroke, a concept of traditional Chinese art and calligraphy. With sweeping glass and a reflective facade, the museum’s exterior takes obvious inspiration from the art visitors will encounter within its walls. The winning design’s facade makes up a tangible interpretation of a brushstroke. Pierced stone screens and streaked patterned glass create a varied, yet continuous exterior. Shimmering and semi-transparent, the surface allows for a blotted reflection of the colors and shapes of the surrounding dragon-shaped garden and sea of red flags. The building touches the ground only at four points, sweeping upwards in its center as if the artist had a vertical inspiration. In this phenomenon, Nouvel has envisioned two different leveled lobbies for entrance to the museum. The summer lobby on the ground floor is exposed to the elements, surrounded by nature. But, in winter months it can be closed off and visitors enter through the first floor, protected from the elements yet surrounded by semi-transparent glass walls that give visions of what’s outside. After entering the competition in December 2010, Jean Nouvel's design was set on a shortlist of twenty, then narrowed down to five, alongside Hadid, Gehry, Herzog & de Meuron (who withdrew), and Safide. Although there was some speculation for a winner after Gehry Partners released their design renderings to the public for a current exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, Jean Nouvel’s highly coveted win was later confirmed by his advisor, Olivier Schmitt. The museum will be located in Olympic Park adjacent to the Ai Wei Wei-designed Bird's Nest Stadium from the 2008 Olympics. The Chinese government has made no official comment on the commission decision or a timeline for construction.
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Starchitects Go Miniature: 20 UK Architects Design Unique Dollhouses for Charity

Children are the focus of twenty new designs by some of the United Kingdom’s top architects. A Dolls’ House, launched by UK property redevelopment firm Cathedral Group, invited architects like Zaha Hadid, David Adjaye, and Alford Hall Monaghan Morris to scale down their architectural feats to a miniature size, each creating a dollhouse of innovative design for auction at Bonhams next month. According to the design brief, each architect’s dollhouse must include a component that would ease the lives of children with disabilities and be able to sit on a 2.5-foot-by-2.5-foot plinth. These unique toy homes recreate the traditional plaything, exhibiting 21st century British art, construction, and creativity. Catherdral Group has pledged nearly $160,000 (£100,000) in A Dolls’ House proceeds to benefit KIDS, a UK charity for disabled children. Currently, the architect-designed dollhouses are available for online bidding but the final auction will take place in person on November 11th. As of yet, most of the reserves have not been met. All Images Courtesy A Dolls' House.
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Zaha Hadid Tapped for Her First Wholly Designed Hotel: ME by Meliá Dubai

In 2007, Zaha Hadid received commission from Omniyat Properties to design the 312-feet-tall Opus Office Building in Dubai. Now, she has been given opportunity to continue this structure’s development beyond solely its architectural exterior. Spain-based Meliá Hotels International announced Hadid as designer for their second hotel in the United Arab Emirates (their first is in Bar Dubai). The internationally renowned architect will be given full creative design of the interior and exterior of the ME by Meliá Dubai Hotel, to be located in her Opus Building. Set to open in 2016, the project will be Hadid’s first hotel designed in entirety. The Opus Building is a unique mixed-use complex. Two edifices make up the plan yet are conceived as a single cube, interconnected with a hollow free-form shape in the middle. During the daytime, a reflective facade creates the illusion of solidity. It is only at night that light from the interior causes the space to appear to outside viewers. Hadid will design the interior of the ME by Meliá Dubai hotel as she completes its rendered exterior. The hotel will occupy 250,000 square feet within the Opus Building, consisting of 100 rooms, restaurants, and top food and beverage brands. The highest floors are planned as exclusive, privately owned apartments and penthouses that will also receive the service of hotel staff. Meliá Hotels International assures that the ME by Meliá Dubai “will stand out as one of the most striking landmarks on the Dubai skyline.” When completed, it will be set in stark competition to other dynamic Dubai structures, like SOM’s Mashreq Bank Tower, in the increasingly luxurious development of the city’s Burj Khalifa district. Renderings Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects
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Zaha Hadid: Right Angles Bad, Dictatorships Okay

The Guardian got up close and personal with Zaha Hadid in a recent, no-holds-barred interview where the Pritzker prize-winning architect gave her two cents on London’s “conservative” architecture climate and railed against rectangular buildings, revealing a nugget of wisdom that perhaps has eluded most designers: “The world is not a rectangle.” Beyond her dislike for conventional corner-oriented design, she also told the reporter that, at her firm, “we don’t make nice little buildings.” While quadrilaterals and “nice” architecture are out of the question, apparently designing in Syria isn’t. That is, unless it is an un-luxurious prison. “Well, I wouldn’t mind building in Syria,” Hadid told the paper. “I’m an Arab and if it helps people, if it’s an opera house or a parliament building, something for the masses, I would do it. But if someone asks me to build a prison, I wouldn’t do it. I wouldn’t build a prison, irrespective of where it is, even if it was very luxurious.” What population living in a war-ravaged country doesn’t need a first-rate opera house?
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Qatar To Host FIFA World Cup 2022 With Stadia by Zaha Hadid, Others

The Arab state of Qatar is in full swing with its plans to host the FIFA World Games 2022. Selected in 2010, it is the first time in the history of FIFA that a Middle Eastern Country has been chosen to host the tournament. Three existing stadiums will be expanded and nine new ultra-modern stadiums will be built, including one designed by Zaha Hadid Architects. The stadiums will reach capacities from approximately 45,000 seats for the group matches, to more than 85,000 seats for the finals. The design vision involves keeping all the stadiums within a one hour drive from the FIFA headquarters, allowing fans to attend more than one game a day. The state has submitted a substantial dossier concerned with all relevant issues ranging from accommodation, transport, security, environment to the stadium infrastructure. Part of the giant venture includes the construction of a a new, 200-mile-long metro system, expected to be completed in 2021. Al Shamal Stadium is one of the proposed stadiums to be completed in 2017. The design of the structure is inspired by the local fishing boats (dhows), commonly used in the Persian Gulf, and will accommodate approximately 45,000 people. Another proposed venue is the Al Khor Stadium which will take on an asymmetrical seashell form, providing capacity for over 45,000 fans, and an additional 1,000 seats for press.
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Zaha Hadid Puts her Curvilienear Spin on the Serpentine’s New Sackler Gallery

Architect Zaha Hadid is finally putting her stamp on the city she has called home for over 30 years with one of her signature curvaceous designs. The London-based architect has designed the new Serpentine Sackler Gallery in Kensington Gardens consisting of both a $14.5 million curvilinear extension and the renovation of the The Magazine, a brick building originally built as a Gunpowder Store in the early 19th century. The new tensile addition rolls up and over the historic structure and houses a new 120-seat restaurant and social space. The building is composed of tailored glass-fiber fabric, steel columns, and glass. This project is not only Hadid's first permanent building in London, but it is also her first permanent completed tensile structure to date. "The extension has been designed to complement the calm and solid classical building with a light, transparent, dynamic, and distinctly contemporary space of the 21st century," said Hadid in a statement. The Guardian reported that the firm designed the Serpentine's firm temporary installation in 2000, and then were commissioned to do another one, dubbed Lilas, in 2007 for "The Summer Party" fundraiser. "But what we have here now is absolutely Zaha's concept from day one. And it isn't just about galleries, it was about creating social space, and supporting the parkland setting," said Julia Peyton-Jones, director of the Serpentine, in a story featured in The Independent.
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Neil Meredith of Gehry Technolgies Presents The Burj Khalifa Ceiling at Facades+PERFORMANCE

October is upon us, which means that the Chicago edition of Facades+ PERFORMANCE is only a few weeks away! Be there as leading innovators from across the AEC industry converge on Chicago from October 24th and 25th at AN and Enclos' highly anticipated event to discuss the cutting-edge processes and technologies behind the facades of today’s most exciting built projects. Don't miss your chance to take part in our groundbreaking lineup of symposia, keynotes, and workshops, and work side-by-side with the design and construction visionaries who are redefining performance for the next generation of building envelopes. Our Early Bird special has been extended until Wednesday, so register today to save on this unbeatable opportunity! Join Neil Meredith of Gehry Technolgies as he examine the relationship between digital design methodologies and real-world construction and fabrication constraints in the complex, wooden ceiling of the Burj Khalifa’s lobby. With representatives from Thornton Tomasetti and Imperial Woodworking, Meredith will lead an intimate, interdisciplinary discussion of the innovative, on-site solutions that his team developed in order to deliver one of the most visible features of the world’s tallest building, so don’t miss out on this rare opportunity! With the deadline fast approaching, Mederith and his team at Gehry Technoligies worked with SOM, Imperial Woodworking, and Icon Integrated Construction to develop new systems, mid-construction, for the design and fabrication of the large, double-curved, wooden ceiling of the Burj Khalifa. Coordinating the work of architects, fabricators, and construction professionals through complex, shared parametric models, Meredith redesigned the ceiling system from the ground up using pre-fabricated, unitized panels to create its astounding, wooden forms. Join in the discussion to hear the rest of this dramatic AEC industry saga in the not-to-be-missed dialog workshop, “Designing for Wood Fabrication in Complex Geometries: The Burh Khalifa Ceiling,” and learn the technologies and techniques behind the creation of this historic project. After earning his Masters in Architecture from Univeristy of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Neil Meredith taught and ran the Digital Fabrication Lab at his alma mater. Meredith earned hands-on experience with cutting edge design technologies and real-world construction challenges with Detroit-based design/build firm M1, the European Ceramic Workcentere in Holland, façade consulting office Front, and as founding partner of design and fabrication studio Sheet. In 2007 Meredith joined up with Gehry Technologies, the go-to design technology and consulting company for the industry’s leading architects. Through the pioneering use of the latest digital tools and processes, Gehry Technolgies has worked with world-class, visionary architects, like Zaha Hadid, David Childs, Jean Nouvel, and of course Mr. Gehry himself, to triumph in the realization of the truly innovative forms of some of the era’s most ground-breaking projects. Register for Facades+ PERFORMANCE today to take part in this and other exciting workshops and symposia. Featuring representatives from SOM, Morphosis, Thornton Tomasetti, and other industry-leading firms, this is one event that is not to be missed. Check out the full Facades+ PERFORMANCE site for the schedule of events and book your tickets now to start the next chapter in your professional career!