Posts tagged with "David Chipperfield":

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David Chipperfield’s Nobel Center is blocked by Swedish court

After the revised scheme for David Chipperfield’s Nobel Center in Stockholm sailed through a city council vote in 2016, Sweden’s Land and Environment Court halted construction on the project on May 22. The $132 million complex was set to break ground on Stockholm’s Blasieholmen peninsula and would serve as a permanent home for all Nobel Prize ceremonies going forward. Chipperfield’s revised design, presented in 2016 to address concerns that the Nobel Center would be too large for the historically sensitive district in which it sits, would see two stacked boxes wrapped in vertical brass louvers dropped right on the waterfront. Although the project passed an additional vote by the Stockholm County Administrative Board last year, the ruling has put a hold on construction over the building's size, color, and sensitive location. The City of Stockholm will reportedly appeal the decision to a higher court. In ruling against the Center’s construction, the court wrote that the building would have a negative impact on the area’s cultural heritage, claiming it would “cause significant damage” to the district’s environment, and “would affect the readability of Stockholm's historical development as a port, shipping and trading city.” Inside, Chipperfield’s scheme for the Center is anchored by an large sunken stage overlooking the Klara Sjö canal, framed by an enormous double-height window bay. When Nobel Prizes aren’t being awarded, the building would be used to host lectures, science-related seminars, regular exhibitions, and other important ceremonies. While the project might be temporarily stalled out, Chipperfield Architects released a suite of new interior renderings right before the ruling came down. The new images reveal the Center’s finalized interior layout and a surprisingly stark choice of materials. The Center’s smaller footprint has necessitated a tighter layout, and from the renderings, it appears that the building will be precisely programmed, with circulation moving around a central void between floors. Chipperfield has chosen to use raw concrete and will keep the building’s structural elements exposed, from the floor joists over guests’ heads to the concrete columns that break up the circulation areas. Even the sunken theater appears to be paneled in precast concrete (no word on how that might affect the acoustic properties). AN will follow up on this story as the case proceeds.
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Adjaye, BIG and DS+R reveal shortlist designs for Adelaide Contemporary

On May 11, Arts South Australia’s design jury revealed the design proposals from the six shortlisted teams selected in the Adelaide Contemporary International Design Competition, a planned art gallery and sculpture park in Adelaide, Australia. The 160,000 square-foot Adelaide Contemporary will house a significant portion of the Art Gallery of South Australia’s 42,000 piece collection, which currently only has a fraction on display due to a lack of space. The museum will draw upon its substantial Aboriginal collection to create the Gallery of Time, which will combine indigenous pieces with European and Asian works. This shortlist's designs follow.  Adjaye Associates & BVN’s design draws upon Aboriginal vernacular architecture through the use of a surrounding canopy, providing shade in one of the more arid corners of the country. With the canopy screening significant portions of the four elevations, the design will largely use skylights and balconies to filter natural light into the central atrium and stairwell. With a twisting, serpentine layout, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) & JPE’s proposal is inspired by Aboriginal sand painting, which often embeds abstract natural elements within a landscape. Through the use of rooftop landscaping, the team hopes to integrate their design with the adjacent Botanic Garden. David Chipperfield and SJB Architects’ is the only timber structure proposal. The principal elevations are composed of wooden screens, and the structure is topped by sloped roofs. In a statement, Diller Scofidio+Renfro & Woods Bagot describe their proposal as a “matrix of unique spaces unbound by disciplinary categories range in size, height, infrastructure, and light quality.” The bulk of exhibition space is located on the second story, which is cantilevered over an outdoor gallery and public square. Hassell & SO-IL incorporate a central plaza into their design proposal, which the team describes as an attempt to bring “nature, art, and people together.” The central plaza serves as a circulation node and public square connecting the gallery’s semi-independent spaces, which are further laced together by a draped, metal brise-soleil. Khai Liew, Ryue Nishizawa & Durbach Block Jaggers proposal consists of a sweeping, perforated canopy supported by a series of pilotis. Beneath the canopy, the site is split roughly evenly between park and curatorial space, the latter presenting sweeping views of the adjacent Botanic Garden. Arts South Australia’s design jury will meet again in May, with a winner expected to be announced in June.
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Adjaye, DS+R, Ryue Nishizawa and SO-IL on shortlist for Australian contemporary art museum

Adjaye Associates, SO-IL, BIG, and Woods Bagot are among the 13 firms the Government of South Australia has selected to produce concept designs for a new contemporary art museum in Adelaide, South Australia's capital.

The Adelaide Contemporary International Design Competition, as it is officially known, asked firms to design both a museum and public space for events around the future Adelaide Contemporary, which will be part of the Art Gallery of South Australia (AGSA) network.

The six chosen teams, a mix of Australian and international firms, are now at work on concept designs that will be revealed to the public in April 2018, right before the competition jury convenes. London's Adjaye Associates was matched with Sydney's BVN, while SO-IL and Melbourne's HASSELL are working together on a concept. BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group (Copenhagen) and JPE Design Studio (Adelaide) are paired up, as is Diller Scofidio + Renfro (New York) and Woods Bagot (also from Adelaide). London's David Chipperfield Architects and Sydney's SJB Architects working together on the design, and a team of three firms—Khai Liew (Adelaide), Office of Ryue Nishizawa (Tokyo) and Durbach Block Jaggers (Sydney)—makes up the final grouping. The firms were selected in the competition's first stage from over 100 teams (525 firms) representing five continents. To create the final teams, organizers paired international winners with shortlisted Australian firms. "This is an extraordinarily rich list of diverse creative partnerships of architects looking to complement their talents by working with both peers and smaller talented practices. There is a strong thread of Australian professional expertise running through the entire list with Australians taking both equal and collaborative positions," said Nick Mitzevich, director of AGSA, in prepared remarks. "The six teams all showed a strong connection with Adelaide—and understood that our aim is not to create an off-the-peg architectural icon but a piece of Adelaide, an entity that will be sustainable and polymathic in the way it enhances the social, cultural and architectural fabric of the city." The final jury will be announced in early 2018.
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Isay Weinfeld–designed Fasano hotel in Miami Beach is canceled

The first stateside incarnation of the Fasano hotel chain by Brazilian designer Isay Weinfeld has been canceled by the developer, HFZ Capital Group. The Fasano Residences Miami Beach, as the project was called, was a planned conversion of Miami Beach’s iconic Shore Club property into a combination hotel and condominium. The Brazilian hospitality company is well-known for its luxury hotels in Brazil, including in Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Punta del Este, and Boa Vista. The project had already experienced delays due to communication issues between brokers and HFZ and a slowing residential real estate market, with only 40 to 45 percent of the 67 residential units pre-sold so far, even though the project was originally slated for completion in 2018. The Shore Club has a long history in Miami Beach, and includes both art deco and midcentury modern mid-rise buildings as well as a postmodernist tower designed by British architect David Chipperfield during the resurgence of South Beach in the 1990s. The design by Isay Weinfeld would have enclosed the slender white Chipperfield tower with its dramatic rooftop space inside a boxy cage-like enclosure that looked remarkably like a giant Sol LeWitt sculpture. The elaborate gardens and pools, also designed by Chipperfield, and the setting of many a legendary Miami Beach bacchanalia over the years, would also have been replaced with a gigantic, minimalist pool that would have been one of the largest in all of Miami Beach. Project broker Jay Parker told The Real Deal that HFZ is currently returning deposits to buyers and has yet to determine whether they will re-launch the project as planned or as a new development. Even though the property “has been deteriorating in anticipation of the project,” as The Real Deal put it, it has been operating under the Morgans Hotel Group flag and will continue to do so.
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David Chipperfield to create master plan for Minneapolis Institute of Art

The Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia) has announced that it has hired London-based David Chipperfield Architects to create a master plan for the future of the museum. The long-term project is aimed at expanding “the community’s access to the museum as a community resource.” The need for a master plan was brought on by the museum's growing attendance and collection. Chipperfield’s office will take on expanding art storage and public gathering spaces, as well as improving parking facilities. The interior of the museum will also be affected by a reassessment of the visitor circulation and an update to the museum's restaurant and auditorium. “We are thrilled to work with David Chipperfield,” said museum director and president Kaywin Feldman in a press release. “Mia has seen tremendous growth in recent years, with repeated record-setting visitor numbers. Our growing collections, innovative exhibitions, and accessible public programs have fueled this growth, and we want to ensure we have the facilities needed to provide inspiring visitor experiences as we embrace an ever-broadening, diverse audience.” Mia’s collection spans 5,000 years and over 89,000 works. The museum was established in 1883 in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, and is one of the largest fine arts museums in the United States. As a government-funded public museum, no admission is charged for entry, except for special exhibitions. The selection of David Chipperfield Architects comes on the heels of a handful of other major museum project announcements in North America, including the St. Louis Art Museum, the master plan for the Menil Collection in Houston, Museo Jumex in Mexico City, and the Anchorage Museum in Alaska.
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David Chipperfield-designed West Village condo finally gets Landmarks approval

It seems the third time's the charm for David Chipperfield. After twice declining to approve his firm's proposal for a West Village condo, pictured above, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) has okayed the design, which has changed only slightly since its last hearing. The proposed structure, at 11-19 Jane Street, sits on a largely residential side street in the Greenwich Village Historic District. Chipperfield's work would replace a two-story parking structure with a six-story condominium building. The firm's first proposal, a white precast concrete building, was rejected by LPC in July of last year. A January proposal did not fare any better and was turned down mostly on the basis of its out-of-character entrances and sliding windows. The new design features casement windows divided by red brick mullions topped by stone lintels that echo the neighbors. A more subtle penthouse roofline responded to commissioners' concerns around the building's height. In a post-decision statement, preservation advocacy group the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP) remained deeply unimpressed with Chipperfield's most recent round of revisions, suggesting the condo would look better beside a highway off-ramp:
It is deeply disappointing that the Landmarks Preservation Commission chose to approve a design which is so patently inappropriate for the Greenwich Village Historic District and for Jane Street. The design is barely changed from the one roundly criticized by the public and rejected in January. It still looks like a chain motel, it’s still too large, and it still sticks out like a sore thumb.  The changes made by the architect since January are the proverbial rearranging of the deck chairs on the Titanic.  This design might look at home next to the off-ramp of I-95, but it does not make sense on this historic side street. We hoped for better from this architect, and from the Landmarks Preservation Commission.
Though the project received unanimous approval, the commission urged the architects to continue to refine the design, especially the windows at street level.
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David Chipperfield’s West Village condo totally misses the mark, says LPC

This week David Chipperfield went back to the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) for a second time, hoping to get approval for his heavily revised design for a West Village condo.

The architects first went before the LPC in July with a white precast concrete residence at 11 Jane Street. This time they were hoping to get the commission’s blessings—but no such luck.

The new design swaps concrete for red brick, and knocks ten feet off the total height to better align with the block's townhouses. The residence, presented in collaboration with Higgins Quasebarth & Partners, would replace a one-story parking garage.

In an email to supporters last week, preservation advocacy group the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP) said the design is not appropriate for the street or in keeping with the overall ethos of the Greenwich Village Historic District.

"[Unfortunately] the new design is not much better than the old one (and may even be worse in some respects)," the email said. "While the new design is slightly shorter and uses a more appropriate brick material, instead of looking like a corporate office building it now looks like a corporate chain motel."

The commission mostly agreed. Though it said the current design "plays better with the neighbors,” commissioners took issue with the sliding windows and door, especially the narrower vertical glass doors to a row of second-floor terraces. To many that spoke, the entrances that flank the sides of the building, closed off from the sidewalk by a low metal gate, lacked the egress signifier that a stoop, for example, would provide.

“I just don’t think this very capable architect has reached the mark," said Commissioner Michael Devonshire. “Articulation in the district is extremely rich and this building lacks it."

Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan echoed Devonshire and added that the LPC must “work within the concept and not send it in another direction."

The LPC took no action and will review a revised design at a later date. Third time’s the charm, right?

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David Chipperfield’s Met renovation put on hold by seven years

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York will delay the redevelopment to its southwest wing by up to seven years as the institution faces cutbacks.

The museum has slashed its budget by $31 million in recent months as it faces deficits. Work on the wing was due to be carried out by British architect David Chipperfield. It was touted to cost around $600 million with the wing housing modern and contemporary art.

Had all gone to plan, the Met would have been able to celebrate ts 150th anniversary with the new wing. Construction would have taken place while the museum used the Met Breuer. According to the New York Times, the Met had not changed its position on the eight-year lease of the former Whitney Museum—something that costs the Met $17 million a year for the privilege.

Work though at the museum will continue. Skylights and a roofing system are in line to be replaced but this is only due to start in 2018, the work of which will be stretched out over four years.

“It’s logical that that’s the urgent project we pursue first,” said Thomas Campbell, the director of the Met in the New York Times. He added that the museum was “baking these long-term projects into a responsible master plan that matches our capacity with our ambition.”

This article appears on HoverPin, a new app that lets you build personalized maps of geo-related online content based on your interests: architecture, food, culture, fitness, and more. Never miss The Architect’s Newspaper’s coverage of your area and discover new, exciting projects wherever you go! See our HoverPin layer here and download the app from the Apple Store.

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David Chipperfield–designed Manhattan tower tops out

Earlier this week, David Chipperfield, founder of his eponymous London-based firm, joined Ziel Feldman, chairman and founder of HFZ Captial Group, as well as other architects, developers, prospective condo buyers, and reporters for the topping out of The Byrant, a 34-story luxury condominium and hotel tower adjacent Bryant Park. HFZ Captial Group is the developer behind the project, which will feature an unconventional palette: terrazzo on the interior and precast concrete panels on the exterior. Both the terrazzo and precast concrete feature a light-gray color flecked with blue and red stones. Chipperfield mentioned that he had to fight to keep this material choice, and while the British architect was grim on the quality of Manhattan developer projects, and even grimmer on the status of craftsmanship in American architecture, the tower is going up terrazzo and all. The Bryant hopes to capitalize on its prime location in the heart of Manhattan and the access to dining, cultural venues, retail, etc. that goes with it. Proximity to Bryant Park is, of course, a major selling point as well—from our perch hundreds of feet above the streetscape, attendees could clearly see the Bryant Park ice rink being constructed. Chipperfield is no stranger to the area, having led the restoration of the nearby art deco American Radiator Building (now The Bryant Park Hotel) some ten years ago. The Bryant's 57 lux apartments will feature expansive views, loads of marble surfaces, and nearly 10-foot-tall ceilings. The lower floors will also feature a hotel. The architects and developers expect the project will be completed by the spring of 2017.
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LPC blasts David Chipperfield’s fancy West Village condo, sends it back to the drawing board

Today the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) blasted David Chipperfield's proposed residential building in the West Village and sent the design back to the drawing board for serious modifications. Developer Edward Minskoff plans to demolish a two-story garage to build a condominium designed by Chipperfield with New York–based Higgins Quasebarth & Partners as local partners. Chipperfield's glass and precast concrete condo would rise five stories with an additional penthouse level set back from the lower floors. In June YIMBY calculated that the 30,676-square-foot building would have seven apartments measuring in at over 4,382 square feet. 327 square feet of commercial space for an underground parking garage would round out the program. Today he defended the (pretty much unchanged) design, noting its "quality" and harmony with neighboring buildings. The LPC wasn't buying it, however. Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan called out the building's height, while other commissioners were just not kosher with demolishing the garage, which dates from 1922. In the presentation materials submitted for today's meeting, diagrams from Chipperfield show the structure's elevation compared to buildings on adjacent blocks. The diagrams show buildings of various height, including many that surpass the three- and four-story height that the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation (GVSHP) pegs for the neighborhood's midblocks. The site lies within the Greenwich Village Historic District, so both the demolition and new construction requires approval. The commission last heard the proposal in June, when a decision was tabled in response to 40 pieces of public testimony, all in opposition to the design. Residents called it a "travesty" that would block sun and air. Andrew Berman, the GVSHP's executive director unleashed a torrent of objections, arguing that the height was out-of-scale with three- and four-story midblock buildings, and that the facade more closely resembled cast-iron faces of Noho and Soho buildings, not Greenwich Village. Perhaps most damning was Berman's assessment of the structure's place in the urban fabric:
"[We] must note the devastating cumulative effect which the loss of buildings like 11 Jane Street has on the scale and quality of the Greenwich Village Historic District. Such buildings have simple but handsome early 20th century detail and contribute to the sense of place and variegated scale of the Village. Their modest one and two story stature defers to the historic residential and commercial structures around them, allowing them to remain in the foreground. They are part of the quirk, charm, and surprise that one encounters on Village streets; each a little different from the next, but sharing common overall qualities.”
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$600 million Chipperfield expansion for Metropolitan Museum of Art put on hold

Slightly more than a year after British architect David Chipperfield was selected to redesign portions of New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, the project has been put on hold. Museum officials disclosed last month that they plan to temporarily suspend design work on the $600 million expansion project as part of an institution-wide effort to restructure finances and address a $10 million deficit. They said the restructuring would be a two year process and that a time frame for resuming design work on the expansion would depend on the pace of fundraising for it. The Chipperfield project will “be quiet for a while,” The New York Times quoted museum president Daniel Weiss as saying. “The pace of the project is slowing,” Weiss said, according to The Wall Street Journal. The Met’s disclosure came in the same week that Museum of Modern Art officials announced a $100 million gift from entertainment mogul David Geffen to help fund their expansion, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Three floors of the museum’s new galleries will be named The David Geffen Wing in recognition of the donation, museum officials said. In March of 2015, officials at the Met announced that the museum selected David Chipperfield Architects to design an expansion, which most likely would involve demolition of the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing in the museum’s southwest corner, to increase exhibition space for modern and contemporary art and to double the size of the Roof Garden above the Wallace Wing. At the time, Met officials indicated Chipperfield also might become involved in redesigning other areas of the museum, including “adjacent galleries devoted to the Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, as well as additional operational spaces.” In effect, he was being tapped to take on the design role at the museum that Kevin Roche had for many years. Demolition of the 110,000-square-foot Wallace wing, which Roche designed and which opened in 1987, would need approval from New York’s Landmarks Preservation Commission and others. In April of 2016, museum leaders disclosed that they plan a series of budget cuts and that the timing of the Chipperfield project would be affected. They said the schematic design phase has been completed and that they will wait to proceed with any more design work until money for the project has been raised. Other aspects of the restructuring include a reduction in staff through voluntary buyouts or layoffs or both, a hiring freeze, and scaling back some exhibition programming, as well as efforts to maximize revenues. The cutbacks follow a period of expansion for the Met, including the opening of the Met Breuer satellite museum inside the former home of the Whitney Museum on Madison Avenue, and a reported $3 million campaign to develop a new branding approach for the institution. Chipperfield’s previous museum projects include the Neues Museum in Berlin, Museo Jumex in Mexico City, the Saint Louis Art Museum and The Hepworth in Wakefield, England. Last month, Chipperfield’s design for a new Nobel Center in Stockholm received approval from the city council there. The Met has been drawing more than six million visitors a year, even before the Met Breuer opened. According to a 2014 report in The Art Newspaper, it ranks as one of the three busiest museums in the world in terms of attendance, after the Louvre and the British Museum.
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David Chipperfield’s Nobel Center given the go ahead

After winning commission for the project in 2014, David Chipperfield and partner Christoph Felger's Nobel Center (or Nobelhuset) has endured a turbulent journey. In September last year, Chipperfield had to curtail plans for the Center, located in Blasieholmen in the heart of Stockholm, after it had garnered fervent opposition. It was reported that thousands had signed a petition stating that the building's scale was inconsiderate given the historic site's sensitivity. Caroline Silfverstolpehe of the Preserve Blasieholmen network, lamented the building, described it as a “giant colossus—a de facto convention centre on the mediaeval quayside pillaging everything in its path.” Now, however, the project has finally been given the green light after the city council voted 54 to 43 in favor of the Chipperfield's altered design. The vote, which Lars Heikensten, executive director of the Nobel Foundation, described as a “resounding yes,” came after planning approval was awarded last month. Provided there are no further appeals lodged against the project, ground could break along the Blasieholmen waterfront by 2017. Construction is set to take up to two years being completed by 2019. The project when amended last year was due to open in 2018. Located on the Blasieholmen peninsula on the edge of the Klara Sjö canal, the Nobel Center will host ceremonies for the natural science, humanities, and peace effort Nobel prizes as well as acting as a civic meeting place. In doing so it will be the first building ever to be dedicated to the event. In a statement on the modified project, David Chipperfield Architects said in September that “the modified design integrates the nobel center even better in its urban context and establishes a lively interaction with the citizens and visitors of Stockholm.” When AN first covered the story, the competition jury commented: “The proposed building conveys dignity and has an identity that feels well balanced for the Nobel Center. The limited footprint of the building allows room for a valuable park facing the eastern portions of the site, with plenty of space for a waterfront promenade along the quay. The facade surfaces will also reflect light from the sky down into the street or open space on Hovslagargatan.” “I understand that it evokes much emotion—to build in the inner city is difficult. It is difficult for the simple reason that we love our city. But I think that this knowledge centre could be something we should be proud of,” said councillor Magnus Nilsson. “I am convinced that the building in itself and the activities that will take place there will be highly appreciated,” he added.