Posts tagged with "56 Leonard":

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Anish Kapoor's New York bean is finally rising at 56 Leonard

Long live the new bean: The long-delayed New York version of Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate in Chicago (colloquially known as The Bean) is finally rising at the foot of the Jenga-like Herzog & de Meuron’s (and executive architect Hill West Architects) 56 Leonard in Tribeca. Prep work for the mirrored sculpture began last summer, as the sculpture’s outline was marked out on the concrete plaza below the tower. Installation proper began in October, and the piece, a bean similar to Cloud Gate but squished below 56 Leonard’s mass, has steadily been arriving in pieces since then. Although the building above was completed in 2016, the bean, which was always intended as part of 56 Leonard (featuring into renderings as far back as 2008) has been repeatedly delayed. As Tribeca Citizen explains in an excerpt from fabricators Performance Structures, Inc. to the building’s developer in 2018:
The Leonard Street sculpture requires equivalent accuracy and precision, but with an added component. Cloud Gate was assembled in Chicago from the finished plate sections and support framework, built at our facility, and then all the joining seams were welded together on site. After the seams were welded, they all needed to be ground down, and the seam zones sanded and polished to match the rest of the plate surfaces. This on-site seam welding was very laborious and extremely costly. […] [...] In order to make the Leonard Street sculpture installation more expeditious, and to save costs, it was decided to build the precision components such that they could be tightly fit together, with the seams thereby becoming nearly invisible hair line cracks. This concept was successfully tested in a sample piece produced by us, and presented to the Artist for his approval prior to beginning the project.
In addition to needing to mill and test extremely precise, interlocking metal plates, each segment will need to be bolted to the concrete plaza, then a system of tension cables for each section will need to be installed and properly calibrated. This will allow the bean to sway with the wind and expand and contract safely with fluctuations in temperature. Although at the time of writing the sculpture is sitting approximately half-finished with the exposed opening covered in plywood, it looks like 56 Leonard will finally be finished.
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Inside Herzog and de Meuron's sumptuous 56 Leonard

What's it like to live on a 700-foot-high cantilever that looks out over Manhattan? Herzog and de Meuron's Tribeca tower, 56 Leonard, does just that and images of its luxurious interiors have been revealed. Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron, both from Switzerland, saw their structure realized in 2015 and the residential high-rise has quickly become an icon in the city due to the myriad of rectangular volumes that cantilever up into the sky. The 60-story, 145 unit building offers a plethora of amenities which can all be found on the ninth and tenth floors. Two levels comprise mostly concrete inside and cover 17,000 square feet, including a swimming pool and an elegant spiral staircase made of concrete of which is shown off in a double-height space. In a similar fashion and making use of the same material, cylindrical columns bridge more double-height spaces, drawing your attention to looped LEDs that hang from the ceiling, also made from concrete. In the swimming pool room, meanwhile, metal tiles make are used, surrounding a 75-foot-long pool and shimmering as they reflect the water. They cover the columns and ceiling, for which we already know the hidden material. Outside, beyond floor-to-ceiling fenestration is a terrace that comes complete with a hot tub. Additional leisure amenities can be found in the form a yoga studio, fitness center, and sauna that uses more reflective tiling on columns and timber strips for seating that wraps around corners. Leather, meanwhile, is the material of choice for seating in a theater donning an all-black aesthetic and using a metal lattice for the ceiling. Light is let in through another floor-to-ceiling curtain wall that spans the double-height space, facilitating views out onto a terrace and over the street. Furthermore, residents have access to a private dining salon, catering kitchen, conference center and a children’s play area. To check out more luxury living that was unveiled this week, take a look at Zaha Hadid's 520 West 28th Street in Chelsea.
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Watch Herzog & de Meuron's under-construction 56 Leonard tower rise in a New York minute

Herzog & de Meuron's New York City skyscraper, 56 Leonard—aka the "Jenga Tower" because of its stacked-cube appearance, is steadily rising in Tribeca. While the building currently has a pretty standard glass box form with some protruding balconies, its upper floors will taper dramatically, hence the nickname. https://vimeo.com/121215554 Ahead of the tower topping out this summer, the 56 Leonard team has a released a one-minute timelapse video that shows the building's progress over the last 14 months. It's a fun (and quick) watch, and nicely builds anticipation for the tower's final form. [h/t Curbed]
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In Construction> Herzog & de Meuron's 56 Leonard

It's impossible to look at renderings of Herzog & de Meuron’s 56 Leonard and not immediately think of Jenga, the game guaranteed to shame one unlucky partygoer for pulling the wrong piece and ruining everyone's fun. Good times! Anyway, back to 56 Leonard in New York City—the 60-story, glassy version of that nerve-wracking game. The project was first unveiled back in September 2008, at almost the exact moment the global economy started to nosedive. So, needless to say, 56 Leonard got off to a slow start. But now the tower is rising quickly and slated to open next year. Construction watcher Field Condition recently photographed the building which has passed its 40th floor and is starting to get its glassy exterior. On the building's first few floors, erratic, cantilevering balconies create that aforementioned Jenga-like effect. But on higher floors, the Jenga-ness of the building quickly fades as the balconies fall into a more conventional pattern, appearing less like bricks from the game and more like, well, balconies. This should change, though, as the building continues to rise as its most dramatic cantilevering theatrics are reserved for its tapering top.