Posts tagged with "432 Park":

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The highest completed penthouse in New York City is also one of the most beautiful

New York-based designer Kelly Behun has completed a half-floor penthouse at Rafael Vinoly’s 432 Park Avenue. Co-developed by CIM Group and Macklowe Properties, the 3,977-square-foot model penthouse is located on the 92nd floor of the 96-story, 1,396-foot-tall residential building, which is the tallest residential tower in the Western Hemisphere. Priced at $39.75 million, the penthouse sits at 1,224 feet in elevation and faces south with views of nearly every New York City landmark including the Empire State Building, Chrysler Building, Central Park, Statue of Liberty, Brooklyn Bridge, Lower Manhattan skyline, and New York Harbor out to the Atlantic Ocean.

@kellybehunstudio perfection on the 92nd floor

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Asymmetrical design pieces respond to the building’s signature 10-foot by 10-foot square windows and iconic white grid. “My goal was to create a timelessly elegant space that feels warm and comfortable. My favorite aspect of the apartment has to be the views through those oversize windows,” said Behun. “To have all of Manhattan unfurl below you in this way is nothing short of extraordinary, and nothing I would do inside could ever upstage that, so I just sought to create a warm embrace from which to enjoy it.” The penthouse has three bedrooms, three bathrooms, a powder room, library, gas and wood-burning fireplace, laundry room, service entrance separate from the elevator landing, and formal entrance gallery.
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Glass cube of retail and offices will sit next to Viñoly-designed supertall 432 Park

New York-based real estate investor Harry Macklowe, behind the Bohlin Cywinski Jackson-designed Fifth Avenue glass cube Apple Store, is working on bringing another cube to Manhattan, this time on Park Avenue. “On Tuesday, Macklowe Properties unveiled renderings for what it calls a ‘Park Avenue Cube’—a low-rise retail building adjacent (and connected) to its luxury condominium tower,” The Real Deal reports. The cube was designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects. “Together, the cube and tower will hold 130,000 square feet of retail and office space.” The cube is sited for 432 Park Avenue—also designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects—and will host two floors of retail space totaling 6,600 square feet and a Zion and Breech-designed marble plaza featuring birches. The cube will connect to the supertall condo tower via a below-ground 30,000 square-foot concourse. 432 Park Avenue, which opened at the end of 2015, is currently the tallest residence in New York City, topping out at 1,396 feet. The property was previously the site of the 1926 Drake Hotel which once accommodated celebrities (Judy Garland, Muhammad Ali, among others) and musicians and bands (Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, The Who, Frank Sinatra). Macklowe bought the property and hotel in 2006, and demolished the hotel in 2007. 432 Park Avenue will also feature 17,600 square feet of office space above 20,000 square feet of retail.  “There are only two markets, ultraluxury and subsidized housing,” Rafael Viñoly told The New York Times in May 2013, at the start of 432 Park construction. At the time, the first ten floors were finished, with 78 left to go.
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This unit in Vinoly’s 432 Park skyscraper goes for baroque with interior design

Love it or not, Rafael Viñoly's 432 Park makes a statement on the New York City skyline. The 88-story, 1,396-foot-tall skyscraper will be home to some of the world's richest people (and/or their faceless LLCs). One soon-to-be-resident is bringing the public's prying eyes inward by bucking the less-is-more aesthetic of contemporary interior design for a maximalist, marble-on-marble pad designed by Brooklyn–based Atelier & Co. Atelier & Co. went for baroque with the design of a 4,000-square-foot residence on the tower's 40th floor. The building's structural tube design allows for open, no-column layouts, allowing residents to configure the space freely from a standard skyscraper layout. Atelier & Co.'s plan removes the sitting room to create a combined dining and living area, divided only by a bookcase lifted from the set of Downton Abbey. Meanwhile, the size of the master bathroom is doubled, presumably to accommodate the owner's collection of marble busts, vases, or anachronistic glass globes. The colonnaded entryways, ornate wood floors, and coffered ceilings do right by Joan Rivers and Louis XIV. Atelier & Co. notes that the design was influenced by 19th century Prussian architect and painter Karl Friedrich Schinkel as well as Leo von Klenze, the German painter, writer, and architect. The designers do recognize that their creation is inside a supertall, not Versaillies. They claim that the aesthetic draws on Viñoly's geometry, perhaps in the patterning of the living room's coffered ceiling. As this monumental throwback interior takes shape, it's a good time to note that the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, the organization in charge of keeping tabs on the world's supertalls, recently recognized 432 Park as the world's 100th supertall. The tower clocks in as the second tallest building completed in 2015, per the organization's numbers. While living in this apartment may cause irreparable damage to your taste, that's not the only danger it poses. A recent study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal suggests that living on a building's upper floors increases the risk of dying from cardiac arrest.
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Eavesdrop> The Bell Rings In Silence: Gossip swirls over changes at AIANY

There was one question on everybody’s mind in New York this spring: What happened to Rick Bell? On March 27, without warning or explanation, the former executive director of AIANY and the Center for Architecture tendered his resignation, effective immediately, which AIANY’s board of directors promptly accepted. The unforthcoming announcement stirred up a steamy fountain of rumor and conjecture—very little of it fit for printing—over what could have precipitated Bell’s speedy departure, and AIANY’s continued reticence on the matter (there seems to be a gag order in place among its staff) hasn’t done anything to lessen the sheer salacious heights to which the gossip has climbed. Bell, for his part, doesn’t seem to be very phased by the upheaval. Eavesdrop spotted him at the Storefront for Art and Architecture’s annual benefit party—held this year in the unfinished lobby of the Rafael Viñoly–designed 432 Park Avenue—wearing a T-shirt that read “I Am Still Alive” and smiling like the cat that ate the canary. Also like a cat, Bell has landed on his feet. On May 8, New York City Department of Design and Construction Commissioner Feniosky Peña-Mora announced that the agency had hired him as its executive director of design and construction excellence. Meanwhile, in an interesting game of musical chairs, the AIANY appointed David Burney, who recently left his post as commissioner of the DDC, as its interim executive director.
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Was Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park tower inspired by an architect-designed trashcan?

AN had the unique opportunity to walk around the top floor of the supertall 432 Park Avenue tower, where the full-floor penthouse with a $95 million view of Central Park is nearing completion. A Saudi billionaire, Fawaz Al Hokair, was recently announced as the buyer. Ironically, The Real Deal has reported this week that it was also announced by one of the architects—at a Cornell Center for Real Estate and Finance lecture in December—that the Rafael Viñoly design was inspired by, wait for it, a trashcan. 432-park-trash-can2 It's no ordinary trash can, however. The alleged inspiration is a design by Viennese Secession/ Wiener Werkstätte mastermind Josef Hoffmann. His gridded designs represented a new rational, rigorous way of composing objects in the beginnings of modern industrial design. Today, apparently, they are being copied at a larger scale for entire building. The geometric purity of the tower originally looked to us like it came from Aldo Rossi, but Hoffmann makes more sense, especially given the urban context/political ambiguity of the building. In the lecture, Harry Macklowe, who co-developed the building with the CIM Group, revealed that Renzo Piano was also considered for the tower but didn’t work out. The idea for a tall building with a pure form came from Piano, and Macklowe carried that idea forward through the project. “Renzo Piano had said to me—if you have a pure architectural form like a square and you uphold the integrity of that architectural form you will build a beautiful building,” Macklowe to the Real Deal. “That stayed in my mind, and I had considered Renzo Piano for the architect, but it didn’t work out for several reasons.” While the world's super-elite who will soon call the tower home likely would snub the idea of living like an albeit more sophisticated Oscar the Grouch, they might do well to pick up their own Hoffmann trashcan, available for a cool $225 from the Neue Galerie.
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Take a look at the view from the tippy top of Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park, the supertall tower that will soon house the world’s billionaires

AN got a rare look at the penthouse of 432 Park, Rafael Viñoly's soon-to-be-tallest residential building in the western hemisphere. After a six-minute ride on the construction lift, expansive, $95 million views open up in a 360 degree panorama from large square windows along all four sides of the full-floor apartment. While the building is still under construction, it has already topped out some 1,396 feet above New York City's sidewalks below. The 85-story tower is expected to be completed early next year, but some of the lower floors will be available for move-in this fall, if you are interested. Deborah Berke is handling the interior architecture in the building. Here are some pictures from the six penthouses at the top of Viñoly’s incredibly tall building on Manhattan’s Billionaires' Row.