Posts tagged with "1100 Architect":

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15 great events to attend during the AIA Conference in New York City

The AIA Conference on Architecture is just around the corner, from June 21 to 23 at the Javits Center in New York City. To add to the excitement, the city will be bustling with architecture events and exhibits, including at MoMA PS1, the Storefront for Art and Architecture, and the Van Alen Institute. Here are our editors' highlights for the week. 1) MoMA PS1 
Young Architects Program Museum of Modern Art 11 West 53rd St. (Midtown) June 18 6:00–8:00 pm. Free. RSVPs required* www.momaps1.org Exhibition reception for 2018 Young Architects Program, featuring finalists LeCAVALIER R+D, FreelandBuck, BairBalliet, and OFICINAA. The winning scheme Hide & Seek by Dream The Combine (Jennifer Newsom and Tom Carruthers), opens to the public June 26. Opening reception, limited space. 2) Night at the Museums Various locations June 19 4:00–8:00 pm. Free. NightattheMuseums.org Fourteen Lower Manhattan museums open their
 doors, free of charge, as part of this annual event. Visit the Skyscraper Museum, African Burial Ground, Museum of Jewish Heritage, South Street Seaport Museum, National 9/11 Memorial, and others. 3) Architecture Books Opening Reception Storefront for Art and Architecture 97 Kenmare St. (SoHo) June 19 7:00–9:00 pm. Free. Storefrontnews.org Now on display at the legendary Steven Holl and Vito Acconci–designed gallery, selection of 100 fundamental books, selected by a jury, based on Storefront’s Global Survey of Architecture Books. On June 26, Storefront will host a conference at the New York Public Library Main Branch (6:30–8:30 pm, free), featuring prominent architects. 4) Solstice: 24x24x24 Storefront for Art and Architecture 97 Kenmare St. (SoHo) June 20–June 21 Storefrontnews.org Making the most of the longest day of the year, 24x24x24 brings together 24 designers to shape a day of programming and contribute a seat for a collective gathering during the summer solstice. From dawn until dusk, 24x24x24 is an experiment in collective production in design, action, and thinking. 24x24x24 is collectively organized and curated by a group of architects who will be taking over Storefront for Art and Architecture from 7pm on June 20 to 7pm on June 21. 5) Mind the Gap: Improving Urban Mobility Through Science and Design Van Alen Institute 30 West 22nd St. (Flatiron) June 20 6:30–8:30 pm. Free. VanAlen.org An examination of how populations move through cities, using tools and methods from neuroscience and behavioral psychology. Organized by the Van Alen Institute. AN’s very own Assistant Editor Jonathan Hilburg will moderate the discussion. 6) Summer Solstice Aperitivo
 Vitra 100 Gansevoort St. (Meatpacking District) June 21 4:00-8:00 pm. Free with RSVP* aiany.org Toast the summer solstice with Vitra and Skyline Design. Aperitivi, live DJ, and special exhibitions. 7) Architecture League Prize 2018: Night 1 Sheila C. Johnson
 Design Center Parsons School of Design 66 Fifth Ave. (Greenwich Village) June 21 7:00–9:00 pm. $10 for non-members. RSVP required* ArchLeague.org Lectures by the winners of the Architectural League’s prestigious annual prize, recognizing the nation’s top young architects: Gabriel Cueller & Athar Mufreh, Coryn Kempster, and Bryony Roberts. Followed by reception 8) Modulightor Building Open House 246 East 58th St. (Midtown) June 22 6:00–9:00 pm. $15. RSVP required* modulightor.com Tour Paul Rudolph’s stunning four-story glass townhouse.
9) Infrastructure: The Architecture Lobby National Think-In Javits Center 655 W 34th St, New York June 22 7:00 am–7:00 pm Prime Produce 424 W 54th St (between 9th and 10th aves) June 23 10:00 am – 7:00pm This Think-In is divided into two parts over two days: active engagement with relevant sessions at the AIA National convention to ensure substantive dialogues on professional issues on Friday, June 22; and Think-In panel discussions on Saturday, June 23 at Prime Produce that examine the theme of Infrastructure. Infrastructure is the network of systems necessary for an organization to function. When those systems are degraded enough, the defining functions of the organization fail. The Architecture Lobby has selected this theme for its first National Think-In to generate a way forward and rebuild our discipline’s infrastructure. 10) Architecture League Prize 2018: Night 2 Sheila C. Johnson
 Design Center Parsons School of Design 66 Fifth Ave. (Greenwich Village) June 22 7:00–9:00 pm. $10 for non-members. RSVP required* ArchLeague.org Lectures by winners of the Architectural League’s prize: Anya Sirota, Alison Von Glinow & Lap Chi Kwong, and Dan Spiegel. 11) A’18 Community Service Day Various locations Check-in: Center for Architecture 536 LaGuardia Place 7:30 am–6:00 pm; reception 6:00–8:00 pm aiany.org/a18 Looking for a meaningful way to spend the last day of conference? AIANY encourages you to volunteer for a half or full day of work that will benefit local nonprofits. Roll
 up your sleeps and pitch in on projects that range from upgrading a church kitchen, fixing a shelter’s community room, working a mobile farmer’s market in an underserved community, and installing infrastructure at a school’s educational outdoor garden. Volunteers will have the chance to make a real difference for these organizations and the people they serve, and
 see parts of New York City that they might not otherwise visit. Collaborating firms include: Cannon Design and Stalco Construction, James Wagman Architect, Murphy Burnham & Buttrick Architects, FXCollaborative, Perkins Eastman, and 1100 Architect. Participants must sign up in advance. 12) Architectural League Prize for Young Architects + Designers
 Arnold and Sheila
 Aronson Galleries Parsons School of Design 66 Fifth Ave.
(Greenwich Village) June 22–23 12:00–6:00 pm. Free. ArchLeague.org Exhibition featuring the 2018 winners of this prestigious prize program. This year’s theme, Objective, asked entrants to consider objectivity and criteria by which architecture might be judged today. 13) Panorama of the City of New York
 Queens Museum Flushing Meadows Corona Park Ongoing QueensMuseum.org Conceived by urban mastermind and World’s Fair President Robert Moses for the 1964 Fair, the Panorama is a 1:1200 scale model of New York City, covering 469 acres and including hundreds of thousands individually crafted buildings. In 1992, the original modelmaker updated the Panorama while the museum underwent its expansion, designed by Rafael Viñoly. 14) New York at Its Core: 400 Years of NYC History Museum of the City
 of New York 1220 Fifth Ave.
(Upper East Side) Ongoing MCNY.org What made New York New York? Follow the story of the city’s rise from a striving Dutch village to today’s “Capital of the World.” Framed around themes of money, density, diversity, and creativity, the city delves into its past and invites visitors to propose visions for its future. 15) Designing Waste: Strategies for a Zero Waste City Center for Architecture 536 La Guardia Place (Greenwich village) Through September 1 CenterforArchitecture.org Waste is a design problem. This show presents strategies for architects, designers, and building professionals to help divert waste from landfills. Curator Andrew Blum will lead tours of the exhibition on Friday, June 22, 10:00–11:00 am, and Saturday, June 23, 11:00 am–12:00 pm. This exhibition is based on the Zero Waste Design Guidelines and supported by the Rockefeller Foundation. Text by AIA City Guide, Storefront for Art and Architecture and AN.
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1100 Architect combines an 1851 cottage with a modern research center on University of Pennsylvania’s campus

In 1865, “hat and cap merchant” Robert D. Work purchased a Gothic Revival cottage at 3803 Locust Walk in West Philadelphia, riding the wave of the migration to the suburbs. This cottage, designed by prolific architect and author Samuel Sloan, was built in 1851. It now forms part of the Perry World House—a new destination on the University of Pennsylvania’s campus courtesy of New York studio 1100 Architect.

Work’s cottage 165 years ago featured fake limestone—stucco scored to look like a French stone chateau in suburban Philadelphia. Today, the new structure, which officially opened September 20, employs a closed facade featuring real limestone blocks hanging from a steel, barn-like perimeter cage.

“The project presented the challenge of putting history adjacent to modernity in the most blunt and direct way,” said cofounder of 1100 Architect David Piscuskas. Though limestone carries connotations of weight, the facade respectfully resists falling flush to the cottage’s shingles, following this sight-line down the rest of the front elevation.

In addition, a cage structure facilitates a more or less column-free interior. This provided freedom when mapping out areas of circulation and spaces for interactivity. (The building has a capacity of 554.)

“Any structural columns that are there are hidden very well,” said Piscuskas, the soon-to-be AIA president of the New York chapter. Despite the closed facade, the building maintains a sense of transparency from both outside and within. “The way that you move through this building is celebrated and is on view at all times,” Piscuskas added. From the outside, wide, metal-framed oriel windows facing the street allow passerby to see inside: Bridges, staircases, and open social spaces are all on display.

Elements of the original structure can be found inside, too. An original wall from the cottage is near the foyer. On the second floor, a meeting room translates the language of the facade as an extrusion through the space. A pitched ceiling creates a sense of verticality resulting from combining the cottage’s original second floor and attic and restructuring the roof.

On South 38th Street, the Wharton School’s imposing building once jarred with the quaint stylings of this 19th-century cottage six lanes of traffic away. Now, its impact is less severe, thanks to the new massing that still manages to mirror and echo the former suburban vernacular. Made up almost entirely of glass fenestration, the double-height venue gets a generous dose of daylight, making it an attractive place to meet. The roof comprises a series of pitches, all varying in height, which creates a contemporary expression of the original gables.

Form was also guided by inconveniences, such as a manhole encroaching on the building’s footprint. “We saw this as an opportunity to have more fun,” said Piscuskas, who described how a chunk carved from a corner was a workaround that aligned with the rest of the building’s similar geometry. The site’s topography, too, falls in line with the angular aesthetic as open space in the rear slopes down to the street.

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The detail-obsessed will love 1100 Architect’s carefully crafted aluminum stairs in this Chelsea gallery

Just off The High Line on West 24th Street, Metro Pictures has been given new life courtesy of New York firm, 1100 Architect. Inside the Chelsea gallery, a (somehow) forgotten skylight has been reborn and a sleek, seamless aluminum stairway also installed. The building is more spacious too: In part due to more daylight entering the building, but also because of a 16 percent increase in exhibition space.

Speaking to The Architect's Newspaper, Project Architect Spencer Leaf said that much of the additional space had come from removing the entry vestibule and re-configuring the interior layout. "Though removing a threshold, we dropped the ceiling over [the] reception so that there is still some perceived transitional space between the gallery and the front door, but without there being a physical barrier. This opened up the gallery to the street more as well."

Leaf also discussed the gallery's new stairway. Muted in style, the minimalist replacement of the original stairs (made from blackened metal and two-inch-thick steel tube treads) resulted from the client's request to "make the stairs more discreet." At a glance, the stairway appears to be draped in a single, wafer-thin sheet of metal that silently climbs up through the stairwell. Despite this slenderness, though, one instinctively knows the material can take a person's weight too.

"We looked at a number of materials and felt that aluminum gave us the most durability," explained Leaf. "We also liked sanded aluminum largely because of its ambiguous quality—it has a certain massive-ness to it. It almost seems like a carved material or a poured material. A lot of people have asked if it was concrete when they have seen pictures of it."

"The material thickness was a particular challenge for us especially with aluminum being particularly soft—it's all a 3/8ths of an inch thick plate," Leaf added. "When we started looking at it as a folded or welded plate, all of our alignments started being ruined due to that 3/8ths thickness."

Within this confined area, material connections are concealed—an effect that causes visitors who care enough about stairwell detailing enough to swoon, yet one others may overlook. "All the treads are built as boxes," explained Leaf, who added that when viewed from one side to the other, no thickness is visible. "They always align at a point that a hair could barely pass through."

Leaf described the stairway as a "relatively compressed space" but highlighted the 25-foot ceiling that opens up above and the recessed Corian handrail. As with the stairs, Leaf said he and the design team didn't want it to be too obvious or direct in its material or function. "The handrail is the same color and perceived materiality as the gypsum board interior walls. However, when you touch it feels almost like stone because of the quality of the Corian," he said.

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1100 Architect transforms 80-year-old church into a performing arts center

The Berkeley Carroll School, Performing Arts Center—located on the northern ridge of Park Slope in Brooklyn—was once a church. Originally built in 1936, the structure has been transformed by New York firm 1100 Architect into a flexible theater and performance space.

The former 80-year-old church can now provide the pre-K Berkeley Carroll School with seating for 396 through a staggered seating arrangement that uses space freed up by the removal of the existing raised stage. Subsequently, the space can be reconfigured to serve as a lecture hall or venue for music, theater, events, and multi-media audio-visual performances.

After 1100 Architect responded to an RFP in 2014, construction began in March 2015. The center has now been open since September. "Both the faculty of the school and the student's parents are very impressed with the space that they now have," said associate principal Gwendolyn Conners, talking to The Architect's Newspaper.

Conners also explained how lighting and acoustic devices made the former church suitable for the school's needs. "The back wall required sound absorption most of all," she said. "We specified a perforated metal system with acoustic material behind. The perforated metal was ideal due to the school needing for it to be durable."
Sound absorbing panels also hang from the ceiling inside. The panels have been arranged by their density and distance from the stage: No panels are located at the front of the stage in order for sound to be reflected back to the immediate audience, meanwhile, to the back, the panel density is staggered to 50 percent coverage and then to 75 percent. Visually, this arrangement also allows members of the audience to glimpse the pre-existing dome above (which has now been illuminated from the inside with cove lighting). In addition to the dome, the church's simplistic neoclassical windows are a dominant feature both inside and out. Though they were never, as Conners said, "an ecclesiastical masterpiece," the windows illuminate the space with daylight—such as when the stage hosts theater and stage set classes. For performances, double-layered curtains are capable of shutting out sunlight when necessary, while also doubling up as sound absorbers.

Consultants:

Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing Engineers: EME Group

Structural Engineering: Hage Engineering

Theater Consultants: Fisher Dachs Associates

Acoustical Consultants: Lally Acoustical consulting

Audio Visual Consultant: Boyce Nemec Designs

Code and Expediting Consultant: William Vitacco Associates Ltd.

General Contractor: Shawmut Design and Construction

Owners Representation: Seamus Henchy and Associates Inc.


Products and Vendors:

Acoustic panels at Ceiling:     Fabric: Guilford of Maine     Acoustic panel: Kinetics Noise Control HardSide

Acoustic panels at wall: Pani-Sorb modular Acoustical Wall Panels

Fixed seating:     Seating: Steeldeck Tip Up Bench Seating     Fabric: Knoll Hourglass

Loose seating:     Chairs: Knoll Spark Chairs     Fabric: Knoll Hourglass

Theatrical fixings Lighting: Barbizon Electric     Theatrical Lighting boards: Barbizon Electric     Rigging and Lighting Pipe Grid: I Weiss

Curtains:     Fabricator: I Weiss     Fabric: KM Fabrics, Seattle Fabrics Athletic Mesh

Flooring:     Stage Flooring: Oil-Tempered Hardboard on Robbins Flooring BioChannel     Linoleum Flooring: Forbo     Carpet: J&J Flooring Group, Broken Slate, Modular

Paint: Benjamin Moore

Signage: ASI New York

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Archtober’s Building of the Day: Metro Pictures Gallery

This is the fifth in a series of guests posts that feature Archtober Building of the Day tours! metro_6018_1 When Metro Pictures Gallery’s Helene Winer and Janelle Reiring approached 1100 Architect about a substantial design overhaul of their sleek Chelsea location, they knew they were in good hands. After all, 1100 had masterfully handled a previous renovation in 2007. There was one caveat: The firm had only three months to complete the project. What 1100 produced is nothing short of elegant. With its stark white walls, high-sheen concrete floors, and 16-foot-high ceilings, Metro Pictures Gallery exudes a timeless downtown art gallery vibe. Although its dichromatic color scheme of white and gray is typical of such establishments, Metro Pictures Gallery’s spatial flow and generous allowance of natural light make it a gallery worth visiting. metro_6023_2 The most aesthetically pleasing update to the 2007 design is inarguably the staircase that connects the first- and second-floor galleries. The previous staircase was a statuesque element fabricated from blackened steel. The new staircase has been moved into the wall behind the reception desk and is now fabricated with welded aluminum sheets. The handrails, made of Corian, and the stairs are both uninterrupted by fasteners, making this basic architectural element feel at once fluid and artful. metro_6085_3 What is most impressive about the building isn’t its aesthetics, but rather its practicality. Without increasing the structure’s overall footprint, 1100 added an extra 16 percent of exhibition space to the gallery. The firm also eliminated the gallery’s vestibule, increasing gallery space and creating a direct visual link from an outside viewer to the art within. All in all, the amount of exhibition space increased by 350 square feet for a remaining total of 9,000 square feet. metro_6088_4 1100 not only had to accommodate visual changes in its revamp of Metro Picture Gallery’s design, but climate-related changes as well. When Hurricane Sandy hit New York City in 2012, four feet of water flooded the building. A careful redesign of Metro Picture Gallery’s storage space allows art to be saved from natural disasters—a fate that some pieces did not meet during the storm. The building has also been outfitted with climate-control infrastructure. Principal architect and designer David Piscuskas, FAIA echoed a sentiment most architects feel now with regards to climate change when he explained, “Architects don’t pay attention to 100-year events; we pay attention to 500-year events.” metro_6046_5 Metro Pictures Gallery opened in May with a Cindy Sherman show and high praise for its new design. But the highest praise (and that which Piscuskas feels most proud of) came from Winer and Reiring when they said, “It feels like we moved when we didn’t.” metro_6067_6 About the author: Anna Gibertini is a freelance journalist based in the New York metropolitan area. She contributes regularly to The ArtBlog, a Philadelphia-based arts and culture publication, and has had work published in Charleston, South Carolina's Post & Courier and Syracuse, New York's The Post Standard. She recently graduated from Syracuse University’s Newhouse School of Public Communications with a master's in arts journalism.
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Archtober Building of the Day #27> Riverside Health Center by 1100 Architect

Archtober Building of the Day #27 Riverside Health Center 160 West 100th Street 1100 Architect Among my favorite things about Archtober are the enthusiasts who show up and add color and detail to the architects' stories about their projects. Today, in addition to a solid performance by 1100 Architect’s Juergen Riehm and Dominic Griffin, we were amply blessed with a number of locals, or, as Winifred Armstrong self-described, “camp followers.” Sally Yap of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene also supplemented our understanding of this new renovation project. The Riverside Health Center, originally designed in 1960 by Harry M. Prince, Architect and opened in 1964, is a handsome, three-story brick and terra-cotta building with aluminum strip windows that is among several civic buildings built in the superblocks created by Robert Moses’ post-war slum clearance on the Upper West Side. It doesn’t even seem like Manhattan up there, between the vast parking lots, the ample playgrounds, small scale civic buildings, and the swath of towers in the park—some notably designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in the 1950s for William Zeckendorf. The building houses the educational component of the city’s food safety program, a sexually transmitted diseases clinic, community facilities, and offices. A bright orange terra cotta-clad corner marks the entrance, and it turns out that it is a Percent for Art installation by artist Richard Artschwager. It’s on the inside, too, adding additional color to an already cheerful interior stair. Both of the interior stairs have been fancied up to entice people to lower their blood pressure by eschewing the elevators. Glazed brick, vertically oriented in bright shades of mango and yellow, makes the stairs positively delightful—and even visible through the two-hour-rated fire glass doors. Active Design takes center stage!
Cynthia Phifer Kracauer, AIA, is the Managing Director of the Center for Architecture and the festival director for Archtober:  Architecture and Design Month NYC.  She was previously a partner at Butler Rogers Baskett, and from 1989-2005 at Swanke Hayden Connell.  After graduating from Princeton (AB 1975, M.Arch 1979) she worked for Philip Johnson,  held faculty appointments at the University of Virginia, NJIT, and her alma mater.
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Ten Finalists Selected for Renovation of Mies-Designed MLK Memorial Library in DC

Out of a crop of 26, ten teams have been invited to present their technical proposals for the renovation of the Mies van der Rohe–designed Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library in Washington, D.C. District officials are hoping to transform the landmark 1972 building, Mies’ last built work and his only in D.C., into a state-of-the-art central library fit for the nation’s capital. The finalists are Cunningham Quil Architects and 1100 Architects, Ennead Architects and Marshall Moya Architects, Leo A. Daly and Richard Bauer, Martinez and Johnson Architects and Mecanoo Architects, OMA and Quinn Evans Architects, Patkua Architects and Ayer Saint Gross, REX and Davis Carter Scott Architects, Shalom Baranes and Davis Brody Bond, Skidmorw Owings & Merill, and Studios Architecture and The Freelon Group. With the library’s plumbing, HVAC and elevator systems in need of replacement, asbestos present throughout the building, and annual maintenance costs soaring to $5 million, the aging athenaeum demands some serious work. Library officials have given their chosen architects a few different options, from a simple update of the building’s ailing systems, to construction of two additional floors or a complete gutting the interior. Either way, the transformation is scheduled to wrap up by 2018.