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Building Ban

Weekend edition: Shigeru Ban and Heatherwick Studio under construction, and more
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Repair plan for shuttered Transbay Transit Center is in the works The Metropolitan Transportation Commission approved a repair plan for the Transbay Transit Center that the Transbay Joint Powers Authority will consider. Shigeru Ban Architects burnishes its status as a leader in mass timber Known for experimenting with paper tubes and bamboo, Shigeru Ban Architects is burnishing its reputation in tall and mass timber. Preview Heatherwick Studio’s upcoming New York City projects Heatherwick Studio has three projects under construction within a 19-block span of Manhattan's West Side, and AN took the opportunity to check in. Seattle set to finally close Alaskan Way Viaduct and open new tunnel The two-mile Alaskan Way Viaduct, long been considered a major hazard to the city and its drivers, will close this Friday, January 11. United States withdraws from UNESCO (again) The United States has withdrawn from UNESCO in protest of the organization's recognition of cultural sites in the West Bank. That's all—see you next week!
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New Year, New News

Weekend edition: BIG moves to DUMBO, Wynn sues in Vegas, and more
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! BIG shows off its new full-block office in DUMBO BIG's full-floor office is a stone's throw from the Brooklyn Bridge and is rife with fixtures and furniture from the studio's collaborators. Wynn Resorts sues rival for imitating its architectural style Wynn Resorts is suing Resorts World Las Vegas, claiming a new casino infringes on Wynn's signature style of curved bronze bar buildings. Francis Kéré, Office Kovacs, and others tapped for 2019 Coachella installations The art and design installations at the 2019 Coachella music festival in Southern California will be created by an array of new and returning participants. Concrete production produces eight percent of the world’s carbon dioxide emissions Concrete plays a larger role in climate change than previously thought, as the 8 percent of carbon dioxide emissions nearly rivals the agriculture industry. Meet the artist who hand-paints ski maps for resorts around the world James Niehues is a Denver-based artist who draws and paints trail maps at ski resorts from New Zealand to Utah. Have a great weekend!
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Happy New Year!

New Year’s edition: Best architecture news of 2018
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last year? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the must-read roundups right here. Enjoy! Egads! Here are the top architecture scandals and controversies of 2018 As 2018 closes out, check out the top controversies that shocked, shook, and rattled the architecture world (and our readers) this year. Let’s kick it: Here are the top sports architecture stories of 2018 Our most popular sports stories of the year tell us that soccer is on the rise in the United States, as well as sustainable stadium design. You said it! Presenting the best reader comments of 2018 People say all kinds of things, but we rounded up our favorite witticisms and notable appearances in The Architect's Newspaper's comments. 2018 was the year of the pyramid What ancient shape, so simple and yet prevalent throughout the history of architecture, captured AN's imagination in 2018? It was all about the pyramid. Announcing the winners of the 2018 AN Best of Design Awards We are proud to announce the winners of 2018's AN Best of Design Awards. Congratulations to all of our winners and honorable mentions!
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Rise and Fall

Weekend edition: Goodbyes for 2018
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Editorial: Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s tenure was a national disgrace Antonio Pacheco, our West Coast Editor, sounds off on outgoing Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and his scandal-ridden tenure. University of Tennessee fires architecture adviser after reported abuse at former job Lee Waldrep was fired from his current job at the school's College of Architecture and Design after a report surfaced accusing him of sexual harrassment. From last week, in case you missed it: Stop asking where all the female architects are; we’re right here Madame Architect editor Julia Gamolina weighs in on the tired, problematic question: Where are all the female architects?
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2018 Winding Down

Weekend edition: Women in architecture aren’t hiding but face challenges in the field
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Stop asking where all the female architects are; we’re right here Madame Architect editor Julia Gamolina weighs in on the tired, problematic question: Where are all the female architects? Design legend Murray Moss discusses the future of “anti-disciplinarity” The design legend gave two lectures and graduate-level workshops this past semester at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). Architects rally behind Doriana Fuksas after prize snub This month two groups started a petition demanding that Doriana Fuksas be included in a lifetime achievement award given to her partner Massimiliano. San Francisco orders historic Neutra home be rebuilt after being torn down After an illegal demolition of one of the five remaining Richard Neutra–designed homes in San Francisco, the homeowner was ordered to build an exact replica. AN will be closed through Wednesday, December 26, but we will see you on Thursday!
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Turning a House into a Home

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Residential — Single Unit
2018 Best of Design Award for Residential — Single Unit: Terreno House Designer: Fernanda Canales Location: Mexico Federal State, Mexico

Located on a mountain three hours outside of Mexico City, the Terreno House addresses two contradictory conditions: seclusion and aperture. Designed by Fernanda Canales, the project’s thick brickwork facade provides protection against the extreme weather of the area, where temperatures often fluctuate 50 degrees on a given day. The home is laid out around four courtyards. Built in different shapes and sizes, each opens up to the project’s surroundings. These voids help frame key aspects of the dramatic landscape. The first, curved patio acts as a transitional space between the exterior and interior, while the second, central patio shifts the program from public to private spaces. A third patio leads to a rooftop terrace, and a fourth provides ventilation and sun to the service area. Each courtyard works to create a different atmosphere and frames the surrounding landscape. While Terreno House’s exterior is clad in brick and its curvilinear roof in green clay tiles, its interior features softer surfaces. A long corridor connects six bedrooms before reaching a shared open-plan living and dining room. In this space, wood and concrete are used to articulate different elements: built-in book cases, a wall-integrated fireplace, and an arched concrete ceiling. The contrast of warm wood and gray concrete carries through in the choice of furniture and upholstery.

Honorable Mentions Project Name: Sky House Designer: Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster Location: Stoney Lake, Ontario Project Name: V-Plan Designer: Studio B Architects Location: Aspen, Colorado
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Building Wall and Building Wall Quickly

Weekend edition: Amazon gets grilled, Brutalism gets preserved, and more
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Stunning new photos document I.M. Pei’s early brutalist museum I.M. Pei's first museum design, The Everson Museum of Art, is a big, brutalist structure that's celebrating its 50th birthday in Syracuse, New York. Chicago aims to preserve the vernacular architecture in its largest Mexican-American community The Commission on Chicago Landmarks has approved a preliminary designation for a dense array of vernacular buildings in the heart of Pilsen. Against all odds, progressive land-use reforms are taking root in American cities With Minneapolis, San Francisco, and Los Angeles moving forward with land-use reforms, the thinking behind how American cities work could soon change. DHS says it is “building wall and building wall quickly” in bizarre statement In an odd press release, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security touts quick construction of the U.S.-Mexico border wall key sections. New York’s proposal for Amazon’s HQ2 is much worse than we thought The concessions from the city have raised eyebrows and triggered a trio of City Council hearings on the terms of the deal.
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Awards Season

Weekend edition: Winners, Travis Scott, and New York’s next great public space
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! MoMA picks five finalists for the Young Architects Program 2019 The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 have announced the five finalists for next year’s 20th annual Young Architects Program (YAP). Snøhetta goes back to the drawing board with revised AT&T Building plans Snøhetta is back at work on the AT&T Building renovation. This time they've released new renderings showing their plans for the tower's entrance and garden. Travis Scott tweets that he is applying to Harvard GSD Travis Scott announced on Twitter that he is applying to Harvard University's Graduate School of Design to study architecture this week. New York’s High Line prepares to open its next great public space The first art project on the new High Line plinth will be Brick House, a sixteen-foot-tall bronze bust of a black woman by Brooklyn’s Simone Leigh. Announcing the winners of the 2018 AN Best of Design Awards We are proud to announce the winners of 2018's AN Best of Design Awards. Congratulations to all of our winners and honorable mentions!
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Modern gifts and more at Glass House Design Store

The ultimate selection of design-minded gifts that will bring joy to all. The Glass House Design Store offers a curated selection of Modern Design gifts and limited edition artist commissions.

Proceeds go towards preservation of the site.

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My Dear Friends...

Weekend edition: Patrik Schumacher takes to the comments to respond to critics
Patrik Schumacher recently took to the comments section of The Architect's Newspaper to respond to critics who published an open letter protesting his suit against the executors of Zaha Hadid's estate. Beneath the letter from "a group of close friends, fellow and former students, and employees of Zaha Hadid," Schumacher wrote:
My dear friends, I wish you had given me a chance to explain to you what is going on before you throw your stones: "Schumacher's ... behavior ... thwarting Zaha's last wishes." Are we no longer on first name terms? Have you seen Zaha's letter of wishes? Let's talk soon.
Rodney Place, one of the signatories of the letter, then responded with the comment:
Dear Patrik, I think, as old friends of Zaha's, we are morally obliged to distinguish (and protect) her "legacy" from her "business". She always tried to make time for her old friends, despite or maybe because of the alienation of fame. Eventually she was everywhere before she arrived; it became exhausting. We need to reciprocate. This might have been an interesting discussion amongst friends and colleagues, including you, about how legacy and inspiration might, in the end, be more important than assets? Unfortunately you took it into the coldness of The High Court, instead of inviting this discussion? Way, way back then, when Zaha had won the Peak competition, but hadn't built a building, I managed through a colleague in New York, to get her as the front of an invited team pitching in the Times Square redevelopment. After she met with the production architect and developer carnivores, she called me. She said, more or less, "Fish, they want me for my body, not my mind". I said, tell them to get f....d. She did. Her mind lives on..... Rodney
The controversy at the heart of the back-and-forth revolves around Schumacher's lawsuit against the three other executors of Hadid's estate. Those executors characterized Schumacher's suit as an attempt by him to take total control of Hadid's property and legacy. Schumacher, however, disagrees with this characterization and said that he is just trying to align the execution of Hadid's estate with her true wishes, known to him. AN reached out to Schumacher for comment, but he did not respond. To catch up on the controversy, check out previous coverage here and here.
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Pilkington Spacia™: Innovation for historic restoration

It is well known that in recent years, and in years to come, energy codes for buildings have and will continue to become stricter. This is driven by a desire to reduce the environmental impact of a building as well as to reduce the cost to maintain that building.

One area that many look to when trying to improve a building is in its windows. Older buildings, created decades ago, or longer, were fitted with single pieces of monolithic glass, providing poor insulation. Eventually, IGUs, or insulated glass units, were created to improve insulation. IGUs were created using 2 pieces of glass and a spacer and therefore were much thicker than the original windows. Unfortunately, this meant choosing improved insulation at the sacrifice of the building's original appearance. Additionally, switching to the IGUs also meant the costly process of ripping out the original window sashes.

Finally, VIG, or Vacuum Insulated Glazing was created to provide the best of both worlds. Pilkington Spacia™ is the first commercially available vacuum insulated glazing product and it provides the thermal insulation of an IGU at the thickness of a standard monolithic piece of glass. Pilkington Spacia™ is now available in North America.

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Gobble Gobble!

Weekend edition: Zaha’s friends fight back, the price of Paul Rudolph, and more
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Zaha Hadid’s friends and colleagues pen open letter against Patrik Schumacher A group of close friends, fellow and former students, and employees of Zaha Hadid are protesting Patrik Schumacher's treatment of her estate. At Sarasota Modernism Weekend, Paul Rudolph dazzles—for a price Sarasota Modernism Weekend gives visitors the chance to experience Paul Rudolph's seminal work, but the pricetag keeps it out of reach of many. Listen to your favorite architect’s band on this designer mixtape Readers may know Michael Meredith and Florian Idenburg from their work in their day jobs, but by night these architects let the music play.