Hayes for Days

Baltimore Museum of Art taps Paula Hayes as first landscape artist-in-residence

East Environment
Baltimore Museum of Art taps Paula Hayes as first landscape artist-in-residence. Hayes is known for fluid and funky work like Gnomes (2018), pictured here. (Paula Hayes)
Baltimore Museum of Art taps Paula Hayes as first landscape artist-in-residence. Hayes is known for fluid and funky work like Gnomes (2018), pictured here. (Paula Hayes)

The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) has selected landscape designer and artist Paula Hayes to serve as its first landscape artist in residence.

With two sculpture gardens and lawns in addition to its main buildings, BMA sprawls over seven-and-a-half acres adjacent to Johns Hopkins University. Hayes, who’s best known for her soothing (and sometimes wacky) sculptures, landscapes, and garden objects, will be in charge of curating the museum’s overall physical environment for two years.

“Throughout my career I have worked with a mix of public and private spaces, but working with an institution like the BMA is a new endeavor for me,” said Hayes, in a press release. “I am honored to have the chance to help shape the natural environment of such a prized community landmark and I look forward to collaborating on the vision for its renewed ecosystem.”

The New York City–based artist designed a botanical sculpture for MoMA’s lobby in 2010 that took cues from leopard slug sex, as well as a Canoes, a permanent work in the Seagram Building that was installed in 2016. She’s also completed landscapes for clients like David Zwirner, Hauser & Wirth, and W Hotel South Beach. At BMA, she will curate an 87,000-square-foot sculpture garden by Sasaki, as well as a 17,000-square-foot garden by George E. Patton that contains early modern sculpture by Alexander Calder, Henry Moore, Isamu Noguchi, and others.

Related Stories