Monad Terrace is its name. Jean Nouvel is its claim to fame. Its submerged future is … quite a shame.

After a period of uncertainty, the developers of the Miami Beach tower, New York-based JDS Development, have finally secured the $62.5 million necessary to undertake the project. Now the company has the go-ahead to complete the tower squarely in the middle of one of Miami Beach’s most vulnerable flood zones.

The Miami Beach tower by Nouvel made a splash last year for the wild and overgrown manmade lagoon at its base. Looking like a modernist structure reclaimed by nature after an environmental disaster à la J.G. Ballard, the structure may well fulfill its own prophecy.

JDS’ Michael Stern told Curbed Miami that the design “is very conscious of what is going on to changes to the streets and concerns about sea level rise.” What this means is that the building will have a below-grade car garage to displace floodwater as well as incorporate landscaping features meant to absorb water, including the lagoon. Ateliers Jean Nouvel stated that the development will be the first condo of its kind to be built surpassing Miami Beach’s revised flood regulations, at 11.5 feet above sea level.

http://www.miamidade.gov/environment/flood-maps.asp

Flood zones in Miami Beach; Monad Terrace’s location is starred. (Courtesy Miami-Dade County)

The interiors are minimalist and luxurious, with marble and oak siding and floor-to-ceiling glass windows boasting expansive views of the Atlantic Ocean. The building’s 80 residential units contain terraces framed by draping bougainvillea and passion vine. Beneath the vines, the structure’s facade consists of an aluminum honeycomb sawtooth screen designed to diffuse direct sun and create the visual effect of light playing on water.

The question now is whether the building’s flood alleviation measures will be enough to shield the structure from a Category 5 hurricane. Awareness of Miami’s Sisyphean struggles with the rising tide has never been higher, but investment seems to keep pouring in for steel-and-glass boxes on the sea.

The project is scheduled to be completed near the end of 2019.

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