Recap

From an urban planning graphic novel to debunking a sustainability myth: AN’s can’t-miss top posts from this week

Architecture National Urbanism
From an urban planning graphic novel to debunking a sustainability myth: AN’s can’t-miss top posts from this week. (Courtesy Chicago Architecture Foundation)
From an urban planning graphic novel to debunking a sustainability myth: AN’s can’t-miss top posts from this week. (Courtesy Chicago Architecture Foundation)

Missed some of our articles, Tweets, and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy!

How green are Apple’s carbon-sequestering trees really? Seen here: Apple Park in January 2017 before the arrival of 8,000 trees. (Courtesy Duncan Sinfield)

How green are Apple’s carbon-sequestering trees really?

When the Apple’s new headquarters is completed later this year, 8,000 trees, transplanted from nurseries around the state of California, will surround the donut-shaped building by Foster + Partners. But how much impact can one tree, or even 8,000 trees, make? The answer: Very limited or null.



The hidden story of Harlem’s gentrification and growth. Seen here: 125th St. in Harlem. (Courtesy [mementosis]/Flickr)

The untold story of Harlem’s gentrification and growth

A new book from the Harvard University Press debunks the idea that the gentrification of Harlem was solely imposed by outside developers and investors.

Anish Kapoor blackest black

Why everybody’s mad at Anish Kapoor. Seen here: the material known as Vantablack.(Courtesy Anish Kapoor’s Instagram: Instagram.com/dirty_corner)

Why everybody’s mad at Anish Kapoor

Did Anish Kapoor cunningly plan this controversy over the world’s darkest engineered material as performance art? To spark a debate about artistic freedom? It could also just be old-fashioned feud.

(Courtesy Chicago Architecture Foundation)

This graphic novel aims to shape Chicago’s next generation of city planners

The Chicago Architecture Foundation’s latest venture is an educational graphic novel about urban planning and its challenges. While the book—titled No Small Plans—raises questions that aren’t new, it serves as an introduction for its target audience, namely children in grades six to ten.

The new Temple Israel of Hollywood by Koning Eizenberg Architecture is a re-configurable social and religious space that celebrates custom craftwork, including a CNC-milled wood ceiling by C.W. Keller + Associates and a hand-rendered sedimentary wall by Shaw & Sons. (©Eric Staudenmaier)

Koning Eizenberg combines symbolism and craft for a new chapel in Hollywood

It took decades of piecemeal construction—a new day school here, a dank brick chapel there—to build the Temple Israel of Hollywood (TIOH). But it would require 10 years of work by Koning Eizenberg Architecture to transform the 90-year-old Spanish Colonial Revival–style temple into a flexible and social campus for worship.

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