There is a mesmerizing new interior in Tribeca that architects and designers should rush to see before it is taken down on June 24. Created by artist Daniel Buren for the new Bortolami gallery at 39 Walker Street, it’s titled To Align: works in situ 2017. Buren has spent 50 years transforming all sorts of interior and exterior spaces with his signature contrasting stripes motif, but if you are familiar with his earlier work, like the Palais Royal installation in Paris, you are aware of his blue and white stripes and will be surprised by the colorful turn his work has taken in the last few years.

Installed in the Bortolami space, To Align: works in situ 2017 uses white and brightly colored alternating stripes of red, blue, yellow, and black-and-white exactly 8.7 cm. in width, as derived from the fabric he first used as a canvas in 1965. The stripes are spatially oriented on the sides of 44 rectangular columns so that from different perspectives one is engulfed by entirely different palates of color. These color fields both react to the existing cast iron architecture and challenge its ‘spaciousness.’ The 44 tightly-packed columns in the space create a magical forest of color while challenging its ‘galleriness’ and, with the gallery’s back skylights covered with colored film, the space is in daytime even more memorable. Buren’s signature vertical stripes wrap around Bortolami’s exterior Corinthian columns, where they will remain until 2021.

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