wHY’s Kulapat Yantrasast to expand San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum

Architecture News Unveiled West
Pavilion Concept. (Courtesy wHY)

Pavilion Concept. (Courtesy wHY)

Kulapat Yantrasast, a principal of Los Angeles– and New York City–based architecture firm wHY, will design a 9,000-square-foot addition to the Asian Art Museum (AAM) of San Francisco.

Existing condition, seen from Hyde Street. (Courtesy Asian Art Museum)

Existing condition, seen from Hyde Street. (Courtesy Asian Art Museum)

The addition, a pavilion, will unify gallery spaces on the east side of the museum’s first floor, and allow the AAM to display more contemporary art. It will be situated atop a wing on the Hyde Street side that dates to the 1990s.

The AAM is located opposite City Hall in downtown San Francisco. (Google Maps)

The AAM is located opposite City Hall in downtown San Francisco. (Google Maps)

Yantrasast will also rework the museum’s galleries to create a more legible layout, allowing more of the 18,000-piece permanent collection to be put on display, as well as permitting more special exhibition programming.

Educational spaces will be updated to accommodate increasing attendance. Currently 35,000 Bay Area students visit the AAM each year, although that number is expected to rise to 50,000 once classroom spaces are upgraded.

Rendering of wHY's addition to the Speed Art Museum. (Courtesy wHY)

Rendering of wHY’s addition to the Speed Art Museum. (Courtesy wHY)

wHY has two museum projects wrapping up in 2016. The firm’s addition to the  in Louisville will be complete this month, while the Marciano Art Foundation, a conversion of a Los Angeles Scottish Rite Masonic Temple into a private art center, should open this September.

The Paul and Maurice Marciano Art Foundation. (Courtesy wHY)

The Paul and Maurice Marciano Art Foundation. (Courtesy wHY)

Right now, the $25 million AAM project is in the schematic design phase, and construction is set to begin next year.

Floor Plan. (Courtesy Asian Art Museum)

Floor Plan. (Courtesy Asian Art Museum)

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